The pilots African American Officers Riveters African American Soldiers 1 Mule Rearing pilots in dress uniforms doughboys with mules gas masks

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

update subscription preferences

View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

May 15, 2018 

Memorial Day Parade Doughboys 2017

World War I Centennial Commission
to be represented in the 2018 National Memorial Day Parade in Washington, DC

The National Memorial Day Parade is coming up -- Monday, 28 May in Washington, DC. It will be a great day. The parade is huge -- marching bands, flags, celebrities, veterans from all ages, 300,000 cheering visitors, and TV cameras that will broadcast the parade across the country. This year, the parade will feature a special tribute to the American veterans of World War I. This tribute will include several World War I-era military & support vehicles -- and a parade float with the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's volunteers, staff, Commissioners, and supporters. Broadcast live to over 100 affiliate TV stations around the entire U.S., and also be live-streamed via Military.com and other online outlets, this parade is our nation’s largest Memorial Day event, drawing hundreds of thousands of spectators to the National Mall to pay tribute to those who have served. Read more about the 2018 National Memorial Day Parade here.


James Reese Europe Concert in NYC

 

James Reese Europe

In 1918, James Reese Europe took the Harlem Hellfighters band to France as part of the Allied Expeditionary forces, introducing jazz to the continent. In the next few weeks, New York City will play host to a couple of amazing tributes to this famous 369th Harlem Hellfighters Regimental Jazz Band. One of these two remarkable shows will be the James Reese Europe Memorial Concert on June 8th at Symphony Space NY. This tribute event is co-sponsored by the New York Jazzharmonic, the New York Veterans Alliance, and the National WWI Centennial Commission. We talked to Mr. Ron Wasserman, principal bassist for the NY City Ballet and founder of the New York Jazzharmonic and its Traditional Jazz Sextet, to hear more about the show, and about the origins of the music that they will play.


A Unique Voice — Maryland World War I Chapel Keeping Faith in Troubled Times

Chapel sign

On June 3, 2018 the public is invited to an outdoor concert and dedication of a WWI Centennial Monument at Epiphany Chapel & Church House in Odenton, MD. In 1918 the Chapel was a home-away-from-home for soldiers and included “reinforcements to the Chaplains of the colored regiments.” Second-floor rooms provided overnight accommodations. The Chapel is a National Register Historic Site featuring a Chaplains’ Peace Garden with bronze plaques naming 2,929 WWI chaplains, among them 24 rabbis and 108 African Americans. The museum is staged as in 1918 with bunk beds, original posters, victrola, trench art, uniforms, and items of everyday life and culture during WWI. Read more about the dedication here.


WWI Poppy efforts part of Historical Awareness Programs from the national Junior Master Gardener Program

Lisa Whittlesey

Our friends at the Junior Master Gardener Program have been making amazing inroads in the teaching of young people about history, and toward the honoring of our nation''s veterans. They have integrated these seemingly separate topics onto the world of gardening for their young members, with remarkable results. We wanted to find out how they succeeded with this special effort, so we spoke to Lisa Whittlesey, Program Director of the Junior Master Gardener Program, to hear more.


Lost and found World War I medal returned to veteran's family in NJ

Medal NJ

A military mystery in Wanaque NJ, dating back more than a hundred years, has finally been solved. Police in Wanaque, New Jersey have been working to return a lost medal from 1917, given to World War One veteran Dan Battaglia. The medal had been unearthed in a wooded area. Battaglia was a bachelor with no kids, so police officers spent weeks digging into records and combing social media to try and find any relatives. As it turns out, his family was still living in the Wanaque area. Read more about how the medal was returned to the veteran's family here.


Annual 'In Flanders Fields' Memorial Commemorative Event in New York City

Flanders figure

On the occasion of Memorial Day, and to remember all those who made the ultimate sacrifice "In Flanders Fields" during World War I, Mr. Geert De Proost, General Delegate of the Government of Flanders to the USA, will be hosting the Annual In 'Flanders Fields' Memorial event on May 24, 10am, featuring the East Coast Doughboys Honor Guard. Read more about this annual WWI commemoration event here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Boy Scouts

Episode #71
Highlights:Scouts, Planes and Sculptors

The sculptor and the airplane industry: Gutzon Borglum | @01:40

General compromise - Mike Shuster | @09:15

Marshall’s plan for Cantigny - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:15

James Reese Europe Tribute Concert - Ron Wasserman | @18:50

WWI Carnegie Council Fellowship program - Dr. Reed Bonadonna | @25:35

A granddaughter's history of the Boy Scouts - Dr. Julie Seton | @31:35

14-18 NOW, UK Centenary Art Commission - Jenny Waldman | @38:00

Speaking WWI: Cup ‘a Joe | @46:05

Dispatch Newsletter highlights | @47:50

The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:35


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Claude Choules, the last man alive who had served in both WWI and WWII.

Ever say "I'm too old to start writing?" "Nonsense!" Claude Choules, the last man alive who had served in both WWI and WWII, might say. He published his memoir when he was a mere 108 years old. 

This week, WWrite features both his biography and an excerpt from his book The Last of the Last: The Final Survivor of the First World War.Don't miss this post about Choules and his life-long dedication to telling his WWI story.


Doughboy MIA for week of May 14, 2018

James Corey

A man is only missing if he is forgotten. 

Monday's MIA this week Born December 16 th , 1894, James Lowell Corey received his education at the Virginia Military Academy

and in the cadet program at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Prior to the war he was working for the Western Union Telegraph Company in Louisville, Kentucky, when he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on November 29 th , 1917. He received his training at Parris Island, South Carolina, and went overseas in March of 1918. There he was assigned to the 83 rd Company of the 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Division and saw much action in the heavy fighting that summer at Belleau Wood, and the Chateau Thierry sector, where he was killed on July 19 th , 1918 near the village of Vierzy. His battlefield grave was never found. The American Legion Post in Argos, Indiana is named in his honor.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Decal Cropped

U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal: $3.95

An easy and inexpensive way to let the world know what year it is!

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Harriett Louise Carfrae

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Harriett Louise Carfrae

 

Submitted by: Mary Rohrer, Dexter County Historical Project

Harriett Louise Carfrae born in 1879. Harriett Carfrae served in World War 1 with the Red Cross. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1920.

 

Story of Service 

Born Ninety miles south of Lake Erie at Norwalk, Ohio on January 10, 1879 to immigrant parents, Harriett Louise Carfrae moved west with her family to Miami County, Indiana before her first birthday. Her father, James, was Scottish and worked as a boilermaker for the railroad. Her mother, Margaret Dillon Carfrae, was Irish, but arrived in the United States by immigrating first to Canada.

Harriett had curly, dark hair, light eyes and wore round wire glasses. It can be guessed that she was not very tall from the average size of others with the same nationality of her parents.

When she was 18, Harriett was part of the leadership of a Christian youth organization named, The Christian Endeavor, which was involved in the temperance movement. She was known as Hattie by her friends.

 

When she turned 21, she moved to St Louis in order to attend the Baptist Sanitarium Hospital School of Nursing. She graduated with 17 other women in 1903. The school of nursing was a two-year program which enrolled its first students in 1895, indicating Harriet was part of the school’s seventh graduating class. At some point, the nursing school expanded to a three-year program.

Read Harriett Louise Carfrae's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


update subscription preferences

View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

May 8, 2018

Islay memorial

Islay ceremonies remember US war dead

Commemorations took place last Friday on island of Islay, Scotland to remember the 700 people who died in two separate World War I disasters nearby, including 200 American soldiers and sailors who died when the troop ship SS Tuscania was torpedoed by a German U-boat off Islay in February of 1918. Eight months later, another troop ship, the HMS Otranto, went down nearby after a collision in a storm. Read more about the international ceremonies here.

Islay flag

The American flag used in 1918 for the funerals of US troops drowned in the sinking of the SS Tuscania has made a 3500 mile journey back to Islay. Four local women and one man sewed it quickly to ensure that the US servicemen could be buried under their own flag. Sent to President Woodrow Wilson by Hugh Morrison, the Laird of Islay Estate, the flag is now in the Smithsonian Institution, but it is spending several months on display at the Museum of Islay Life in Port Charlotte before returning to Washington, DC. Read more about the historic flag here.


Poppies, flyover mark WWI Centenary at North Carolina State University

NC State flyover

North Carolina’s main U.S. World War I Centennial Commission observance – and the only one of 100 worldwide events held on a college campus – took place last week, at the Memorial Tower, NC State’s iconic tribute to its students and alumni who served and died in the war. NC State Alumni Association executive director Benny Suggs and U.S. World War One Centennial Commissioner Jerry Hester, both military veterans and NC State graduates, were among the speakers at the event, held on the steps of the Belltower.  Read more about the ceremony here.


Centers For Disease Control hosts 1918 Influenza Pandemic Commemoration

CDC

the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is commemorating the 1918 influenza pandemic and the many public health accomplishments that have occurred over the past 100 years. The centennial presents an opportunity to emphasize the continued threat influenza viruses pose, and the CDC's vital role in maintaining our nation’s capability to prepare for and respond to an influenza pandemic. Much of the 1918 flu pandemic can be related to the conditions of WWI. Read more about the CDC's commemoration activities.

Also listen to our Podcast interview this week @ 32:15 with Author Kenneth C. Davis, who shares the story of influenza in 1918 from his new book coming out May 15, 2018: "More Deadly Than War: The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War"


Who was Alan Seeger, and why did President Macron mention him in his speech before Congress?

Alan Seeger

During his recent visit to the United States, France's President Emmanuel Macron underlined America's centuries-long history of special partnership, including several specific speech mentions related to World War I. One of the most significant World War I mentions was during his speech before the Joint Session of Congress, at the U.S. Capitol. There, President Macron told the story of Alan Seeger, an American poet who is venerated in France, to include a memorial statue in Paris. Who was Alan Seeger, and why is he such a powerful symbol? We decided to find out; our Intern Nicole Renna has the story.


In 1918 New York Guard soldiers survived subs, crowded ships to deploy to France

troop ship NY Guard

As April 1918 became May, the 27,000 Soldiers of the New York National Guard's 27th Division left Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, and boarded trains and ships heading for France where World War I was raging. The 27th Division, which included all but two regiments of the New York National Guard, left New York in August and September 1917. There had been a massive parade down Fifth Avenue when the division left, and then eight months of training in South Carolina began. Led by Maj. Gen. John F. O' Ryan, the National Guard Soldiers built their own camp, dug practice trenches and lived in them, learned to shoot, and reorganized for war. Now they were headed for France. Read more about the 27th Division going to war here.


World War I Legacy: Politics & Medicine of Treating Post-Traumatic Stress

Gassed snip

The Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs recently presented a session of their Living Legacy of the First World War project titled "The Politics and Medicine of Treating Post-traumatic Stress (PTS) Since World War I." Tanisha Fazal, a professor at the University of Minnesota, is writing a book on how dramatic improvements in military medicine and also the expansion historically of veterans' benefits have increased the long-term, downstream costs of war for the United States. In this program, she discusses how World War I was a turning point in military medicine "in terms of acknowledging and starting to identify and treat what we call today post-traumatic stress." Read the entire Carnegie Council interview program here.

Also listen to our Podcast interview with Mark Wilkin @ 18:30, about his recently published article in the Smithsonian’s Air and Space magazine called “The Dark Side of Glory: An early glimpse of PTSD in the letters of World War I Aces.”


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. Spotify, NEW on YouTube

John J Pershing

Episode #70
Highlights: General John J. Pershing

May 1918 Preview Roundtable - Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | 02:50

General Rumblings - Mike Shuster | 18:00

War In The Sky - Eddie Rickenbacker | 21:45

Documentary: “Blackjack Pershing: Love and War” - Prof. Barney McCoy | 25:55

The big influenza pandemic - Kenneth C. Davis | 32:15

WW1 War Tech - Fed billions, killed millions: The tragic story of Fritz Haber | 39:25

100 Cities / 100 Memorials from Brownwood, Texas - Dr. Steve Kelly | 44:15

Speaking WW1: Binge | 50:00

Articles and Posts: Highlights from the Weekly Dispatch | 51:50

The Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | 54:15


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

War Isn’t the Only Hell: A New Reading of WWI American Literature by Keith Gandal

Unlike every other combatant nation in WWI, America's lasting literature on the conflict was written entirely by noncombatants –Hemingway, Dos Passos, Katherine Anne Porter. This week on WWrite, Keith Gandal discusses his work on the unknown yet vital role noncombatant writers, such as African Americans and women, played in shaping America's WWI memory. Don't miss this fascinating post!


Doughboy MIA for week of May 7

Harry Bohannon

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week

Monday’s MIA for May 7th, 2018 is Private Harry M. Bohannon, who enlisted on May 8th, 1917 at his home of Logansport, Indiana. He trained at Fort Thomas, Kentucky and then Camp Greene, North Carolina, where he was assigned to the assembling 3rd Division. Designated a rifleman, he was sent to Company L, 38th Infantry, and embarked with them for overseas duty on March 30th, 1918. That summer, the 3rd Division stopped the German advance on Paris at the Marne River. The engagement spilled back and forth onto both banks of the river and in the heavy fighting Private Bohannon was severely wounded in action on July 1st, 1918 while trying to cross back over the river to the bank held by his regiment. In the process he drowned. It is unclear whether one of the bodies later pulled from the river was his or not. (Doughboy MIA has begun preliminary plans to launch a deeper investigation into this case.) The American Legion Post in Delphi, Indiana is named in his honor.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative tie - back

World War One Custom Silk Tie - Great for Grads and Dads

$59.95

The 100% woven silk tie has been custom created for the World War One Centennial Commission.  

The red silk tie features World War One era aircraft and the official logo of the Centennial Commission on the back.  This beautiful tie also comes packaged in a 2 piece box with the Doughboy seal printed on the top, making a great gift for both Grad and Dads.

 Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Everard J. Bullis, Sr. 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Everard J. Bullis, Sr.

 

Submitted by: Robert G. Bullis {Son}

Everard J. Bullis, Sr. was born around 1896. Everard Bullis served in World War 1 with the United States Marine Corps. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

 

Story of Service 

Everard J. Bullis was my Dad, who enlisted in WW1 from St. Paul, Minn. He enlisted in the Marines and arrived in France on May 7, 1917.

June 8, 1918 he entered the fight in Belleau Wood. In July he went over the top with the 5th Marines in the St Mihiel Drive.

Later, during the battle on the Champagne front, he was wounded in his right lung. I, Robert G. Bullis, have that bullet, his medals and memorabilia, and most of the original letters to and from his parents and 4 sisters during his service.

 My Dad wrote his memoirs in the 1950's, which were edited recently by David Bullis, my Nephew. This book is being published this spring entitled "Doing My Bit Over There".

Read Everard J. Bullis, Sr.'s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


update subscription preferences

View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

May 1, 2018 

Nurses Winsonsin

Two WWI nurses led the way for women in today’s Wisconsin National Guard

Two women serving as Army nurses in World War I were part of a long journey resulting in the opportunity for women today to serve in every duty position in the Wisconsin National Guard. Nurses Irene Robar and Linnie Leckrone treated wounded 32nd Division soldiers while under artillery fire and became two of the first three women ever awarded the Silver Star Medal. Robar and Leckrone, recent graduates from Chicago’s Northwestern University, were two of the 10,000 nurses who served in France with the American Expeditionary Force. Read more about these two heroic women whose service continues to be an inspiration today in WI.


Liberty Car "paying tribute to those that served and sacrificed in the Great War"

Marc Lassen

From the beginning of the U.S. entry into the war in 1917, approximately 2,000 Cadillacs were sent to France along with the U.S. military forces of the A.E.F. Cadillacs were known at the time as the most durable, fastest, (and finest) cars in the U.S., thus, the Seven-Passenger Touring Cars were a natural choice as the official vehicle for military officers. Marc Lassen is the owner of US1257X, the only surviving intact Officer's Cadillac from WWI. It's a vehicle which has been on a remarkable journey, surviving service with the American Expeditionary Forces in France when many others were lost to time, or disposed of after the War. In addition to its War Record, US1257X also had the prestige of driving the young Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt, daughter-in-law to the former President. Mr. Lassen generously agreed to collaborate with the World War 1 Centennial Commission in several events, including the Under Glass display currently available to view on the National Mall. He spoke with us a little about his famous car.


NARA has WWI Army Division records online for work by "Citizen Archivists"

soldiers

Last April, the National Archives embarked on a two year commemoration of the United States’ entry into World War I. NARA established a World War I Centennial portal which highlights educator and genealogy resources, articles. NARA also created a multimedia timeline, events and exhibits, and archival records documenting the U.S. experience in the conflict. Now, Citizen Archivists are helping to make these records more accessible through NARA's World War I tagging and transcription missions. NARA has a new transcription mission for our Citizen Archivists, with the publication of Army Division records from WWI. You can help NARA transcribe these incredible records--click here for more info on becoming a Citizen Archivist.


'The Hello Girls' movie tells story about Army's first women troops in World War I

Hello Girls trio

Not all heroes wear capes. Nor do they all fight with weapons. The “Hello Girls” fought with skill and cutting edge technology — well, cutting edge for the early 1900s. The Hello Girls were the first women to be sent to war by the U.S. Army, working as telephone switchboard operators and connecting 26 million calls throughout the First World War. “This is where the women’s service in the military starts, as soldiers and not as nurses,” said independent documentarian James Theres, who directed the new documentary “The Hello Girls.” Read more about "the first Americans sent to World War I in 1917 and among the last to leave the following year."


The 'Wallace and Grommit' studio is creating emotional World War I game

11-11 logo

Games set in real-world conflicts don't necessarily glorify war, but it's rare that they fully address the horrors of war. For every poignant story like Valiant Hearts, there's many more titles that might only offer token commentary. Wallace & Grommit's Aardman Animation Studios, Bandai Namco, and DigixArt want to change that. They've unveiled 11-11: Memories Retold, a narrative adventure about two World War I soldiers who meet under the "most unlikely of circumstances." Details of the plot and gameplay remain under wraps, but the creators make it clear that it's about the "emotional" human experience, not the fighting. Read more about this new WWI video game product here.


How World War I Changed Literature

Rupert Brooke

World War I, the war that was originally expected to be “over by Christmas,” dragged on for four years with a grim brutality brought on by the dawn of trench warfare and advanced weapons, including chemical weapons. The horrors of that conflict altered the world for decades – and writers reflected that shifted outlook in their work. As Virginia Woolf would later write, “Then suddenly, like a chasm in a smooth road, the war came.” Read more here about how the WWI affected the writing of poet Rupert Brooke and so many more.


Sergeant Stubby: The little lost dog that fought to liberate France in World War I

SGT Stubby mug

The France 24 network, which broadcasts 24 hours a day, seven days a week to 250 million TV households in 177 countries around the world in three languages, posted a story to its web site last week about a stray dog...but a very special one: Sergeant Stubby. France 24's Stéphanie Trouillard uses the recent release of the Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero movie to reprise the remarkable career of the lost dog from Connecticut who became an unlikely American military hero in WWI. Read the whole story, told from a French perspective, here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. NEW Now listen on Spotify.

Elsy Janis, The “Sweetheart of the doughboys”

Episode #69
The Sweetheart of the Doughboys:

US Telephone in WWI -  Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser, AT&T | @02:25

The tide begins to turn - Mike Shuster | @10:10

The “Sweetheart of the doughboys” - Edward Lengel | @14:25

The Women’s Land Army - Elaine Weiss | @22:55

Anzac Day -  Group Captain Peter Davis & Commander Peter Kempster | @30:30

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Granite, OK - Phil Neighbors & Perry Hutchison | @37:40

Speaking WW1: Kiwi & Aussie | @44:25

WW1 War Tech: Geophone | @45:35

Dispatch Newsletter Headlines | @47:20

WWI Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @50:05


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

American snapshot of the French Riviera post-WWI: 

The sparkling turquoise waters of the Meditteranean Sea, the dry perfume of parasol pines, chilled white wine, the Lost Generation, jazz... 

Few know the famous "Côte d'Azur" was also the place where thousands of soldiers from French colonies – Senegal, Indochina, Madagascar – died in military hospitals from their battle wounds. 

French journalist, Stéphanie Trouillard, returns to WWrite this week. Don't miss her post this week about her web-documentary on the memorial and cemetery built in their honor. 


Doughboy MIA for week of April 30

DOughboy MIA Generic image

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Pvt. Charles H. Holland from Raunsaville, Mississippi. Private Charles Holland was a member of Company L/9th Infantry/2nd Division. On July 18th, 1918, during the battle of Soissons, Pvt. Holland was severely wounded in action, taking machine gun fire to the hip just as his unit went over the top. His sergeant, Nathan Sanders, saw him hit and had him carried off to a field hospital, but he was never seen nor heard from again. Despite searches conducted following the war, it has never been discovered what happened to Pvt. Holland. His name is carved on the Walls to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne (Belleau Wood) American Cemetery.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Small Memorial Day flags

Last Chance to order 8" X 12" memorial flags for Memorial Day. $7.95 each

You don't want to pay rush shipping for these and supplies are limited. This is the year to display the memorial ground flags honoring your fallen doughboys!

The WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 8 inches x 12 inches.  It sports the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and is secured on a 15.75" wooden dowel with a decorative ball on top .  

It also features "Double Honors", because a portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for the America's National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park, in Washington DC. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Chester Allen Bower and Charles Edward Bower

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

Bower & Bower


Submitted by:
Valerie J. Young {granddaughter and grandniece}

Chester Allen Bower born around 1894, Chester Bower served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

Chester Allen Bower and Charles Edward Bower: “Brothers in Service"

My maternal grandfather was Chester Allen Bower (at left), and his brother, Charles Edward Bower (called Charlie), was my great-uncle. They were born in New Oxford, Pennsylvania and both served in the Great War.

Charlie was a Sergeant with the U.S. Army Medical Corps, and his dates of service were March 26, 1918 to October 20, 1918. He died of the influenza pandemic while at Camp Mills, Long Island NY; he was just 20½ years old.

Chester was a Private in the AEF’s 79th Division, and his dates of service were September 21, 1917 to June 7, 1919. His unit served in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, where he was gassed close to the Armistice.

Read Chester Allen Bower's and Charles Edward Bower's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


update subscription preferences

View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

April 24, 2018

Tree Planting

Gift from French President recalls WWI USMC heroics in Battle of Belleau Wood

On his visit to Washington DC this week, French President Emmanuel Macron brought a special gift to the White House -- one that bears great World War I significance: a European Sessile Oak sapling from the Belleau Wood in France, in which more than 9,000 American Marines died in battle one hundred years ago this June. The two Presidents and their respective First Ladies appeared on the South Lawn to ceremonially throw dirt on the site where the tree, about a meter and a half tall and between five and 10 years old, had been planted. "The forest is a memorial site and important symbol of the sacrifice the United States made to ensure peace and stability in Europe," First Lady Melania Trump's office said. 'France is a very special country,' President Trump said. 'It's a great honor.' Belleau Wood was the first battle in WWI that employed a majority of U.S. Marine Corps infantrymen for the Allies, and their success in this difficult battle -- against some of Germany's most experienced combat veterans -- established the Marine Corps as a world-class fighting organization. Read more about the tree planting and the Battle of Belleau Wood here.


Building a World War I tank in the garage

 

Strong and grandfather

Two of our new friends - Dr. Doug Strong and George Reinke -- have a pretty unique weekend project. They are building a WWI tank in a garage. Actually, we should say that they are building another WWI tank in a garage -- they already completed one, earlier last year. We wanted to hear more about these interesting people, and why they are doing what they do, so our Intern Nicole Renna asked them for an interview. Doug Strong (pictured at top left in his reenactor gear,  with his grandfather who served in WWI below) took some moments to give us an update on this WWI commemorative project.


Pennsylvania WWI Centennial Committee sets World War I History Symposium at the U.S. Army History & Education Center

USAHEC

On Saturday May 12th, 2018, the Pennsylvania World War One Centennial Committee will continue to observe the 100th Anniversary of the first World War through sponsorship of a World War One History Symposium at the United States Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, PA. This event will feature four unique and engaging presentations by retired U.S. Army Major Kurt Sellers, retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel John D. Shepard, Gloria J. House, author of Spirit of Philadelphia: A 100th Anniversary of WWI Story, and Barbara Selletti, genealogist, historic researcher, film producer, and academic librarian at Neumann University. Read more about this incredible historical opportunity.


WWI flying ace Raoul Lufbery will be honored in Wallingford, CT in May

Lufbery

Wallingford, CT will host a ceremony next month to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death of former town resident Maj. Raoul Lufbery, World War I flying ace. A special military parade and plaque dedication ceremony will be held May 5 to honor Lufbery. In 1916, Lufbery joined a group of American volunteers – the Lafayette Escadrille – that fought with French forces for nearly two years before America entered the war. Within three months, Lufbery recorded five official kills and went on to to record 17, becoming America’s first ace pilot in the war, according to the National Aviation Hall of Fame. Read more about how Wallingford will be honoring its native son here.


Remembrance and the Great War

Gerald York in NYC

How did York Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan get its name? The 33-block swath between the Queensboro Bridge and Asphalt Green is actually named for Sgt. Alvin C. York, the citizen‐soldier-hero of the U.S. Expeditionary Forces in World War I whose exploits 100 years ago, under withering German machine gun fire, won him a Medal of Honor. On April 11, 2018, Alvin York's grandson, Col. Gerald York, participated in a ceremony to mark the anniversary of the street renaming and recalled York Avenue’s colorful history as part of the celebrations to mark the end of the war. Read more about the NYC ceremony here.


NCSU bell tower event to commemorate WWI sacrifices of students and alumni

NC State Belltower

For North Carolina State University alumni and military veterans, the May 1 U.S. World War I Centennial Commission celebration at NC State’s Memorial Tower is more than just a half-hour event on the list of 100 worldwide commemorations about the end of the great conflict. It’s an opportunity for all to learn about the sacrifices made by NC State students and alumni, and the commitment that the school has made since its inception to military service and leadership. Nearly 2,000 students and alumni served in the global war, and the Belltower includes the names of the 34 who died in combat, in training and from sickness. Read more about the May 1 World War I ceremony at NC State here.


Story of World War I Choctaw Code Talkers told at Reims event in France

Luke Clay

Tiajuana King Cochnauer, a registered Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma artist,  presented Telling Our Own Story: Choctaw Code Talkers, at an international conference in Reims, France, in April. Reims is near the World War I battlefields where the 19 young Choctaws from Oklahoma confounded the German army by transmitting messages in the Choctaw language. Their successful efforts in October 1918 made them known as the original Code Talkers. With Cochnauer at the Reims event was Luke Clay (right), great-great-grandson of Tobias Frazier, one of the original Code Talkers. Read more about this commemorative event here.


Help sought to return World War I medal unearthed in N.J. woods to vet's family

Found Medal NJ

A man scanning public land in Wanaquen New Jersey with a metal detector made an unusual discovery -- a dirt-covered World War I service medal that apparently belonged to a former borough resident. After finding the medal, the man turned it into Wanaque police. Cleaning off the medal, the police found the recipient's name, and are now looking for the veteran's family. Read more about the discovery and efforts to send the medal home here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. NEW Now listen on Spotify.

Manfred von Richthoven

Episode #68
War In The Sky

The Mystery of the USS Cyclops | @ 02:40

Submarine Stories  | @ 04:55

Learning to command on the front - Mike Shuster | @ 07:20

The 2nd Division: Army and Marines - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 11:40

War In The Sky: Including the Red Baron goes down | @ 17:00

Midway Village reenactment - Dave Fornell | @ 20:25

Stars & Stripes newspaper - Robert H. Rheid | @ 27:25

The Great Forgotten Play - Karen & Kacie Devaney | @ 34:00

Speaking WWI: Pillbox | @ 39:25

Education Newsletter: Issue #12 | @ 41:05

WWI War Tech: Interrupter Gear | @ 42:05

Dispatch Newsletter: Headline Highlights | @ 44:30

The Centennial Buzz in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 47:05


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

In a Lonely Forest

WWICC and WWrite have shared Patricia Hammond’s story of the haunting WWI song, "Soon, all too soon," by Ernst Brockman and the search that led to the identification of the forgotten composer’s body.  But what of the song’s lyricist, Josef Rust? In this week's post,"In a Lonely Forest,' amateur detective and WWI poetry expert, Connie Ruzich, talks about her quest to find Rust, a journey that led her to uncover another great WWI writer. 


Doughboy MIA for week of April 23

 Otho Bradford Place

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is 2nd Lt. Otho Bradford Place.  Born March 27th, 1893 in Bremen, Indiana, Place served as a lieutenant in Company G/305th Infantry/77th Division. During an attack along the Agron River about a kilometer north of St. Juvin on November 1st, 1918, Lt. Place was killed instantly by machine gun fire to the head. His soldiers buried him along a hedge, marking his grave with his cane. One of his dog tags was affixed to the cane, while the other was left around his neck. When GRS searchers went to look for him following the war, they were unable to locate a grave based on the information provided. However, a recommendation was made to examine a certain set of remains recovered by the French in the general vicinity and reburied in a local cemetery, where they had been recovered by GRS and were then at the Meuse-Argonne Cemetery; the circumstances of initial recovery and basic physical evidence of which seemed to point toward being those of Lt. Place. There is no evidence that has been found to this point which indicates that this recommendation was ever followed up on, therefore Doughboy MIA has classified this case as open/in suspension pending the location of additional paperwork. In August, 1931, Lt. Place’s mother went on a Gold Star Pilgrimage to see her sons name on the Walls of the Missing at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery at Romage-sous-Montfaucon. American Legion Post 191 in Bremen, Indiana is known as the Otho B. Place Post 

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lapel pin

 

Centennial Commemorative Lapel Pin $4.95

 Proudly Wearing the WWI 100 Years lapel pin is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago.

This satin nickel lapel pin is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Peter Harry Marvrias

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Marvriaś

 

Submitted by: Steven Hull {grandson}

Peter Harry Marvriaś was born around 1887, Peter Marvrias served in World War 1 with the the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

 

Story of Service 

My grandfather, Peter (Pete) H. Marvrias, died when I was four. My recollections of him are vague, but I remember him as a kind, fun loving person. Growing up, two pictures were hung in my grandmother’s bedroom: one a formal portraiture of Pete in his World War I Army uniform; and the other a showing a kneeling soldier looking up at Columbia, the female representation of the United States. In her right hand was a sword resting on the soldier’s right shoulder. At the top an inscription reads, “Columbia Gives To Her Son The Accolade Of The New Chivalry Of Humanity”. At the bottom in hand written scrip was “Peter H. Mavrias, Pvt, Co. H. 167th Inf.”, followed by the words “Served With Honor In The World War And Was Wounded In Action”, signed “Woodrow Wilson”.

Pete Marvriaś life was an adventure, not unlike that of hundreds of thousands of other early 20th century immigrants beaconing to Lady Liberty’s call ‘…give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses”. He was born August 4, 1887 in Vervena, Greece. Pete traveled alone to the United States, knowing that America meant freedom and opportunity. It was 1903. He was sixteen.

Read Peter Harry Marvriaś's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


update subscription preferences

View this in your browser

Dispatch header 800 - 061217

April 17, 2018 

Soldiers from the 26th Division after the Battle of Seicheprey, 1918

The Yanks of Seicheprey

On April 20th, 1918, in Seicheprey, France, near the St. Mihiel Salient, American soldiers engaged in their first significant infantry battle of World War I. The Battle of Seicheprey occurred on the southern side of the St. Mihiel salient. There, three companies of the Yankee Division's 102nd Regiment occupied a trench, known as the Sibille trench. On April 20th, the German Army attacked from the northeast, north, and northwest, arriving at the town simultaneously in three different groups. This attack outmaneuvered the Americans, and inflicted a number of U.S. battle casualties, but the Americans threw the Germans back. Read more about how this first significant battle demonstrated the mettle of the Doughboys.


VMI and VA Commission present WWI Commemorative Symposium April 27

VMI-VA Commission

As part of Virginia’s commemoration of the World Wars, a joint symposium by Virginia Military Institute and the Virginia WWI and WWII Commission marks the 100th Anniversary of America’s participation in World War I. In the historic setting of Virginia Military Institute in Virginia’s scenic Shenandoah Valley, conference attendees will hear from national and regional experts, who will explore the political and military leadership of World War I, the experiences of the soldiers and generals on the front, and the role that Virginians played in the Great War. Read more about this outstanding WWI conference here.


Treasure trove of WWI Diplomatic Courier Service artifacts in en route to the State Department in Washington D.C.

Peaslee with Treaty

Today's U.S. Diplomatic Courier Service traces its founding to December 2, 1918, when Gen. Pershing directed the creation of a group of handpicked Army couriers to perform host of diplomatic duties. This first group of couriers -- known as the Silver Greyhounds -- was created. organized, and led by Army Major Amos J. Peaslee.  After the war, Major Peaslee’s  personal documents, and artifacts related to the Diplomatic Courier Service, including a personal engraved copy of the Treaty of Versailles, documents from his time in Russia during the Russian revolution, historic photos, travel documents from across Europe, and other unique items from his colorful career, began a multi-continent odyssey of their own that finally ended this year in Colorado Springs. Read more about the donation of Major Peaslee’s treasure trove of WWI to the State Department here, and check out the Denver Post's story about Peaslee "wellspring of history" here.


WWI history on display at U.S. Army's Fort Benning museum in Georgia

Ft Benning display snip

Many installations across the U.S. Army are marking or have marked the centennial of the construction of their posts, which occurred in the weeks and months following the U.S. declaration of war on Germany, April 6, 1917. Fort Benning was one of the last installations to be activated in October 1918, just a month before the armistice was declared on Nov. 11, 1918. To mark the occasion, the WWI history on display at the museum here has devoted a large exhibit to what is sometimes referred to as "the Great War." Read more about the new Ft. Benning WWI display here.


A new reading of American WWI literature

Keith Gandel mug

Writing for the Johns Hopkins University Press web site, scholar Keith Gandel asserts that "One hundred years after U.S. involvement in World War I, it is time to revisit our literature that came out of that conflict--because we are only now, finally, able to understand it in its actual historical context." Gandel has written a book to that end:  War Isn't the Only Hell: A New Reading of World War I American Literature draws on military archives and cutting-edge research by social-military historians to "come to terms with the works of thirteen of our major writers, including some famous authors and some who were in their own time well-known but have been mostly forgotten." Gandel suggests that  "until very recently, we had forgotten a tremendously important aspect of the U.S. experience" in the war "that eventually changed this country forever." Read Gandel's entire thoughtful essay here.


Max Beckmann: The Faces of World War I

Max Beckman mug

Max Beckmann, 1884–1950, was a painter and print-maker, primarily known for his self-portraits. Most commonly classified as an Expressionist artist, his work dramatically changed after his WWI experiences. Beckmann volunteered in the Medical Corps in Belgium as an orderly in 1914, but was discharged after having a nervous breakdown in 1915, which led to the dramatic transformation of how he depicted himself and humanity in his art. The National Institutes of Health's National Library of Medicine had a unique opportunity to acquire two original Beckmann prints which he created during his recuperation after he was discharged from service. Read more about these unique works of art that "emulate the crippling effects that the war had on Beckmann, his acquaintances, and his view of the world" here.


U.S. Navy Submarine Chasers in WWI: very small ships make very large impact

Lt. (jg) George S. Dole

When Todd Woofenden discovered the cache of paperwork, photos, and other artifacts belonging to his great uncle, Lt. (jg) George S. Dole (left) after his service as commanding officer of a submarine chaser in WWI, he could see in these materials a fascinating, untold story of technical ingenuity, experimentation, and raw grit. This was the advent of antisubmarine warfare, and the men who served on the chasers were right in the middle of it. New technologies, quaint by modern standards but top secret innovations at the time, were being tested and adapted even as the chaser fleet was being built and deployed. Woofenden built a web site and has written a book to tell the amazing story of the U.S. Navy's Submarine Chasers of WWI. Read more about these "little ships that could" and "The Sub Chaser Archives" here.


Bringing Indian-American contributions in World War I into historical discussion

Tanveer Kalo

Tanveer Kalo, former intern at the World War I Centennial Commission, was previously profiled in the May 16 and August 29 issues of DISPATCH in 2017, and in the February 6 issue this year. He continues to get media attention for his research into Indian Americans who served in the U.S. Armed Forces in WWI.  The Study Breaks web site recently published a article about how Kalo found Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind, the first turbaned Sikh to serve in the U.S. military in 1917. Thind would be the first of many Indian-American WWI veterans whose stories Kalo would share in the World War One Centennial Commission web site's "Indians who served" section. Kelo himself also penned an article for the Aerogram web site titled "Re-Discovering the Unknown: World War I’s South Asian Soldiers in the US Military." Good work, Tanveer!


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. NEW Now listen on Spotify.

Charlie Chaplain

Episode #67
Highlights: Financing WWI

Financing WWI - Reaching for the stars | 01:55

The 369th hits the front lines | 08:30

The British Struggle continues - Mike Shuster | 10:40

The Yankee Division learns at seicheprey - Dr. Edward Lengel | 15:10

A century In the Making - The maquettes get busy | 21:00

“Lest We forget: The Great War” -  Kenneth Clarke & Michael Robbins | 25:05

How to teach about WWI - Dr. Ian Isherwood | 32:30

Speaking WWI - Pilates | 38:25

100 Cities / 100 Memorial in Jackson, TN - Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls | 40:25

WWI War Tech - Carrel-Dakin Antiseptic | 45:55

The Weekly Dispatch Newsletter overview | 47:50

The Centennial In Social Media - Katherine Akey | 50:25 


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

"Robert Frost: A poet for whom life and war were trials by existence."

When scholars write of war poets, few consider Robert Frost. If a war poet is one who has experienced the turmoil and vicissitudes of combat, Frost does not qualify. However, if one is willing to consider poets who offer insight into connections between war and the human condition, then Frost fits the bill. To learn more about Frost and WWI, don't miss week's WWrite post by Jim Dubinksy, 


Doughboy MIA for the week of April 16

John McGavock Grider

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is probably the most well known American MIA of the war. John McGavock Grider was a fighter pilot and the supposed author behind the best-selling book ‘War Birds: Diary of an Unknown Aviator’, published by the famous American fighter ace Elliot White Springs in 1926. In truth, the book was only loosely based on Grider’s diaries from the war and highly embellished by Springs with his own experiences. Yet it is probably one of the most authentic illustrations of the American pilot experience to come out of the war and remains popular to this day.  Born in Arkansas on May 28th, 1892, John Grider was a hard core southerner who enlisted in the Army Signal Corps in June, 1917 to be an aviator. Sent to England and trained by the British, afterwards he served with No. 85 Squadron of the RAF under the Canadian ace ‘Billy’ Bishop until America could field a large enough air service to accommodate all its flyers. Grider was the victor in at least four aerial combats before he disappeared near Houplines, France coming back from a patrol with Elliot Springs on June 18th, 1918. Despite some speculation, no one has ever positively found out exactly what happened to him. What is known is that he was buried by the Germans behind their lines. Following the war, the (then) British Imperial War Graves Commission recovered his remains and transferred them to the British military cemetery known as Motor Car Cemetery, but speculation exists as to whether the grave had been properly identified. When America set up the permanent Flanders Fields American Cemetery at Waregem, Belgium, it is believed that Grider’s remains were transferred there from Motor Car Cemetery along with several other Americans, but his identity was never confirmed and therefore he lies in one of the 21 ‘Unknown’ graves at Waregem and is commemorated on the Wall to the Missing there.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget jacket

"Lest We Forget: The Great War" is brand new way for you to help build America’s WWI Memorial, in Washington DC. At the same time, you get to enjoy a very special, colorful, inspiring and lasting souvenir of the centennial!

The book features nearly 350 high-quality images, an introduction by Sir Hew Strachan and text by historian Michael W. Robbins. The project is dedicated to the Centennial and produced by The Pritzker Military Museum and Library along with the WW1 Centennial Commission.

Importantly, when you get this visual remembrance of the "War that Changed The World"  - a full ½ of the proceeds go to building the Memorial!

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Mary Alice Lamb 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Mary Alice Lamb

 

Submitted by: Mary Rohrer Dexter

Mary Alice Lamb served in World War 1 with a non-government service organization. The dates of service are: Known 1918-1928. 

  

“Those who go forth ministering to the wants and necessities of their fellow beings experience a rich return, their souls being as a watered garden, and a spring that faileth not…”

– Lucretia Mott 

Tucked away in the South West corner of Miami County, Indiana is the small community of Amboy where in 1844, the first Friends Worship service was held in Miami County and six years later, a log church was erected at a location that would later be next to Amboy Friends Cemetery.  Until a school was built in 1872, the church doubled as a school.   In 1867, the Panhandle Railroad was completed through Miami County and the small town of Amboy was platted as the location of the train station.

When, in 1871, Benjamin B. Lamb laid an addition to the original Amboy platt, his son Ezra must have been living in the area, for on July 28, 1878, Ezra Lamb and his wife Eliza were holding a beautiful baby girl in their arms whom they named Mary Alice.

Read Mary Alice Lamb's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


"Pershing" Donors

Founding Sponsor
PritzkerMML Logo


Starr Foundation Logo