Riveters African American Soldiers 1 African American Officers doughboys with mules The pilots pilots in dress uniforms gas masks Mule Rearing

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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October 31, 2017

Ceremonial Memorial groundbreaking Nov. 9 to live-stream on Commission Facebook page 

Memorial

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission will host a ceremonial groundbreaking for America's World War I Memorial on Thursday, November 9, 2017, 11:00 am EST, at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. It will be available for viewing via a live-stream on the Centennial Commission's Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/.

The Honorable David J. Shulkin, 9th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs

Guests of Honor will include The Honorable David J. Shulkin, 9th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs (right), senior military & veteran leaders, as well as Centennial Commission members, members of the historical/cultural community, U.S. and city officials, and major donors. U.S. Military Academy Cadets, the Pershing Rifles Group, and the US Army Band's "Pershing's Own" Brass Quintet are also expected to participate. Read more about the ceremony here.


Veterans History Project schedules WWI special programs for Veterans Day 2017

VHP

The Library of Congress’ Veterans History Project (VHP) will celebrate Veterans Day, between Nov. 7 to Nov. 11, with live book talks and a variety of performances, guided tours, workshops and other activities. The series of events, titled “Coming Home: Veterans Day at the Library of Congress,” will take place in the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library. From a letter-writing event for active-duty service personnel to examining objects a World War I soldier needed, these activities intend to honor and recognize veterans and their families and explore the ways military men and women have connected to home and family during and after service from World War I, Vietnam and the current conflicts. Read more about the program here.


"He was just a boy who marched away to serve and die for our country, in the war that is often forgotten."

Carl's Story

On November 10, 2008, the eve of the 90th Armistice Day, Noretta Willig's phone rang. A genealogist from Oregon working for the US Army identified her as the next of kin of her uncle, Carl Willig, who had been killed, but his body lost, in 1918 during the battle of St. Mihiel. Now, thanks to a fortuitious discovery in an isolated wood in France, Carl had been found. "From that second," says Noretta, "I was compelled -- I would even say driven – to write Carl’s Story." This thoughtful book, written as a Commemorative Partner of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, tells the compelling story of how "Through a long and extraordinary series of coincidences, described in the book, Carl was found and identified. Then, after almost a century, Carl came home. Home at last." Read more here about the making of the book, the people and organization who helped bring Carl home again, and the powerful effect this journey had on the author herself.


War Horses 103 years on: Horse Heroes WWI memorial fund nears $1 million

Brooke USA

Some 103 years ago this month, the first of America’s horses and mules exported to join the World War One war effort in Europe left their homes. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the US entering WW1, and Brooke USA’s Horse Heroes campaign has raised nearly $900,000 of its million-dollar goal to honor the memory of those horses by raising funds to improve the welfare of working equines around the world. Brooke USA, an official Commemorative Partner of the United States World War I Centennial Commission, is raising one dollar in memory of each of America’s horses and mules who served in World War I. Read more about Brooke USA and the Horse Heroes campaign here.


North Carolina scholar decoded German World War I secret correspondence

Charles Jastrow Mendelsohn

Not every North Carolinian who served in the armed forces during the First World War carried a gun on the battlefields of France. Some were administrators. Others served as nurses, artists, naval officers, and chaplains. At least one NC person served as a cryptographer—someone who specializes in encrypting and decrypting sensitive information—during the war period: Wilmington native Charles Jastrow Mendelsohn. The entirety of his year-long military term was spent stateside at posts in Washington D.C. and New York City where Mendelsohn led at team tasked with decrypting intercepted German diplomatic correspondence. Read more here about how a professor of ancient languages at the City College of New York helped the U.S. read the enemy's mail during WWI.


National WWI Museum event looks at Great War's resistance and impact

Dora Maendal of Fairholme (Man.) Hutterite Colony

While many events have honored heroism and sacrifice during World War I, a different kind of conference gathered in an unlikely place to pay tribute to those who opposed the Great War a century ago. “Remembering Muted Voices: Conscience, Dissent, Resistance and Civil Liberties in World War I Through Today” took place Oct. 19-22 at the National World War I Museum and Memorial. Museum president and CEO Matthew Naylor said the work of interpreting the First World War and its impact isn’t just to glorify heroism and sacrifice but to reveal the catastrophe of spilled blood. Historic peace churches were well-represented at the conference, which included 70 academic paper presentations and was attended by about 250 participants. Read more about the proceedings of this important event here.


The world forgot a 402-foot-long painting. Here's what happened when it was found.

Pantheon de la Guerre

Shortly after World War I broke out in 1914, two French artists could already predict that the conflict would take place on a scale unlike anything ever seen, so would demand a tribute on an equally unprecedented scale. More than 100 French artists — mostly older men who were not able to fight themselves — worked on Panthéon de la Guerre, the painting measuring a whopping 402 feet around and 45 feet tall. Depicting some 6,000 heroes of the Allied war effort, it was billed as the world's largest painting, and toured the world. But it wound up by 1940 sitting in a crate outside a Baltimore warehouse, wet, forgotten, and forlorn. Read more here about how the monumental work was rescued, refurbished, and found a permanent, dry home at the National World War I Museum.


Website Features -- the Official Bulletin

Official Bulletin

From 1917 to 1919, the Official Bulletin released daily reports on the war from the Committee on Public Information. The Committee on Public Information -- also known as the CPI -- was established by President Woodrow Wilson in order to engender positive national support for the war. The CPI was responsible for movies, posters, the Official Bulletin, cards, buttons, cartoons and more. Legendary Public Relations man George Creel was the Chairman of the CPI. Creel ensured that only the best news was broadcast and transferred across every medium. The goal of the CPI was to make sure that every American was absorbing the propaganda and pushing national favor towards the war effort.  Every day except Sunday, the World War One Centennial Commission web site re-publishes the Official Bulletin on the centennial of that issue's original publication date. Check out the Official Bulletin here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

1st. Division begin the move to the front - still fresh faced and innocent

Episode 43
Highlights:

US troops quietly begin deployment to the western front | @01:15

British troops near mutiny - Mike Shuster | @06:55

Zeppelin L-49 captured intact - War in The Sky | @10:50

Announcing Ceremonial groundbreaking for America’s WWI Memorial in Washington DC -Facebook Live stream coming | @15:30

All about America’s WWI Memorial in DC - Edwin Fountain | @16:15

Junior Master Gardener Poppy Program update - Lisa Whittlesey | @24:10

Speaking WWI - the word is Nark! | @29:35

100C/100M project profile - Borough of Danville, PA - Jamie Shrawder | @31:00

International Caparetto, Kobarid and Karfreit - Commemoration | @36:10

First three American combat casualties - from 16th infantry | @37:35

The Franco-American links - US Centennial Commissioner Seifried | @39 :00 

About Aline Kilmer’s poetry - Peter Molin on WWRITE blog | @39:35

Buzz on Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome and selection of the Unknown Soldier | @40:45 


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

fleece vest

Black Full Zip Fleece Vest - $39.95

It's fall! There is a chill in the air. The leaves are turning. The days are getting shorter. The smell of wood fires is wafting around. Yup... It's time to cozy up with this warm fleece vest.

The vest features a Black with white doughboy embroidery. 100% spun polyester, 12.5 Oz. Premium anti-piling fleece. 

It has full zip front with two side seam pockets. Mens’ sizes available S – 2XL.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Henry Zeller

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Zeller

 

Submitted by: Wanda Zeller Peterson {granddaughter}

 

 

Henry Zeller served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known August 28, 1918 to January 27, 1919..

My Grandfather Henry Zeller was in the United States Army, his service number (SN) was: 4 706 169. 

His dates of service: He was inducted at Carson, ND on August 28, 1918 and sent to Camp Lewis, WA. He served in the 166th Depot Brigade to September 6, 1918; Company H, 76th Infantry to discharge on January 27, 1919 at Camp Lewis, WA. He was only in for 5 months. He was a Private First Class.

He was born in the United States of parents who were Germans from Russia. He was very proud of his German Heritage and very proud to have served in the US Army. Decorations and Awards per the National Archives and Records Administration: WWI Victory Medal and WWI Victory Button (Bronze).

Read Henry Zeller's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 24, 2017

"To honor our Regiment’s fallen and remember all soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice"

Stephen Clay

On 3 November 1917, Corporal James Gresham, and Privates Thomas Enright and Merle Hay, were killed in action during a German trench raid near the little village of Bathelémont, France. These soldiers -- all members of F Company, 16th Infantry -- were the first three American soldiers killed in combat in World War I. The 16th Infantry Regiment Association will honor Gresham with the dedication of a plaque at his mother’s home in Evansville, Indiana, at 10:00 am, on 3 November 2017.  We spoke to the Association's President, Steven E. Clay, about about the First Three and the remembrance of all the 16th Infantry's soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice.


"Involve the young generations to perpetuate the French-American legacy" 

Seefried

Earlier this month, the city of Versailles France rededicated a pair of major memorial statues in their city -- one to WWI American General John Pershing, and the other to American Revolutionary War hero, the Marquis de La Fayette. These statues were conceived and started after the close of World War I, as a thank-you and remembrance of the fraternity between the U.S. and France. However, the peace after World War I was imperfect, and the permanent statues were not completed -- until this month. Our Commissioner Monique Seefried attended the re-dedication ceremony at Versailles, and she talked to us from France about the event, the statues, and what they mean.


"The relief and story that I’ve created are a visual poetry of World War 1"

Memorial relief detail

Sculptor Sabin Howard has published an absorbing meditation on art, his own art, and the evolution of the design for the new National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. Through a series of personal vignettes, Howard details the intertwining of classical and historical themes and technology from which the Memorial bas-relief sculpture is emerging. Read all about Howard's personal journey toward "creating a sacred art of re-humanization" as he "left behind that realm of esoteric creation and moved into the realm of artistic creation that is in service of many."


U.S. Marshals during World War I: Protection of the Home Front from enemy aliens, spies, saboteurs, and slackers

U.S. Marshal badge

When President Woodrow Wilson issued the declaration of war against Germany April 6, 1917, he told the American people that "the supreme test of the nation has come. We must all speak, act, and serve together." While American troops fought in the trenches of Europe, United States Marshals protected the home front against enemy aliens, spies, saboteurs, and slackers. Read more about the responsibilities and activities of U.S. Marshals during World War I here.


Fake News and fervent nationalism got a Senator tarred as a traitor during WWI

Robert "Fightin' Bob" La Follette

Robert "Fightin' Bob" La Follette was one of the most hated men in America when he took the U.S. Senate floor on October 6, 1917. Vicious caricatures depicted the Wisconsin senator receiving the German Iron Cross medal and holding a German spiked helmet. Theodore Roosevelt, La Follette’s old rival in the Progressive movement, called La Follette “the most sinister foe of democracy in this country” and told an audience that he wished “we could make him a gift to the Kaiser for use in his Reichstag.” His transgression? Opposing the United States’ entry into World War I. Read the entire La Follette story here.


Tarred and feathered: The tragic plight of Germans in America during World War I

German-American Farmer John Meints

As Europe was ravaged by fighting in World War I, German immigrants in the US suffered harassment, internment, lynchings - and even the humiliation of being tarred and feathered. Although a little-remembered part of history today, America was completely wracked by the fear and paranoia that swept from coast to coast during the Great War. The United States declared war on Germany in April 1917 and helped lead the Allies to victory. But before victory came, many Americans were terrified of the potential home-grown German threat .A fascinating collection of photos have resurfaced showing the hardships faced by German-Americans at the brutal height of the First World War. Read the entire Daily Mail article about the plight of Germans in the U.S.


Website Features -- WWI Video Library

Video Library

 

Do you like learning about World War I in new and exciting ways? If you said yes, then it’s time to check out ww1cc.org/video! The Video Library on the World War One Centennial Commission Website is a collection of videos created by the Commission and produced by other organizations.  The videos vary in length but all of the videos provide interesting facts and figures about the Great War. Many of the videos provide information about the Commission and the forthcoming World War I Memorial in Pershing Park. Other videos serve as educational tools that trace the events during and people of World War I.   One of the videos to check out is a commemorative ceremony in Kansas City from April 2017. The moving ceremony uses music, anecdotes, and narrations to show how the Great War sparked “The American Century.”  Another video to explore is a presentation called the “Impact on the Nursing Profession.” In this video, several Army Medical Historians discuss the how World War I generated an incredible growth in the number of nurses. This video even includes some incredible World War I photography!   There are many different videos to watch in the Video Library. Visit ww1cc.org/video to discover and learn about World War I today.  


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Those magnificent men and their flying machines

Episode 42
Highlights:

Trading With The Enemy Act |@01:15

Mata Hari is executes - Mike Shuster |@06:10

Little companies big ideas - War in the Sky |@09:50

Gilder Lehrman Institute program - Tim Bailey |@14:30

Speaking WWI: “Short Hairs” |@ 21:20

100 Cities / 100 Memorials genesis and future - Ken Clarke |@22:40

100 Cities / 100 Memorials profile - Memorial to US Air Service - Michael O’neal and Robert Kasprzak |@30:35

Kiwis Commemorate Passchendaele |@37:00

Michigan sign WWI Centennial Commission into law |@39:00

Madame Curie in WWI |@39:40


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Are war wives war poets, too? 

Can we consider those women who write about the contortions on domestic life and feminine sensibility wrought by war as veteran writers?

Author, veteran, and teacher, Peter Molin, explores the question this week in a post about poet Aline Murray Kilmer, wife of well-known American WWI poet, Joyce Kilmer, who was killed during the Second Battle of the Marne in 1918. 

Throughout Joyce's deployment and then after his death, the words of Aline's poetry, in ambiguous ways, convey the urgency and nuance of a war wife's uncertainty as she finds her tranquility and self-worth vexingly dependent on her husband, even in his permanent absence. 

Don't miss this rich, insightful post about the often-overlooked and, yes, war poet, Aline Kilmer!


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Liberty Bond Poster

“Liberty Bond Poster"  Buying it is your DUTY! $12.50

100 years ago this month, the Wilson Administration was in the midst of their second Liberty Bond Drive. 

By this week, a century ago, they had sold over $2 Billion of bonds - by convincing Americans that it was their DUTY to support the war effort through buying Liberty Bonds.

Well, we want to convince YOU that it is YOUR duty to support the commemoration of WWI by buying this liberty bond theme poster.

We don't need $2 billion - but we do need your help which you can do by buying really cool Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.

THANK YOU.


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George Goody 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

George Goody

 

Submitted by: Jack Sherman {grandson}

 

 

George Goody served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known 1910-1920. 

My grandfather joined the Army at 16 to avoid working in the woods of Maine. His father signed his papers but couldn't read and write English so was rather angry when he figured out what was happening.

George left Maine and ended up in troop I 6th Cav on the Texas Mexico border during the punitive expedition. Since he didn't read or write English he was never promoted in 6 years of service.

When we declared war on Germany and the Army needed French speakers grandpa George became a genius overnight since he could read, write and speak French just fine.

Read George Goody's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 17, 2017

Medals

United States Mint reveals designs for WWI Centennial Military Silver Medals 

The United States Mint has revealed the designs for the five World War I Centennial Silver Medals being issued by the Mint in conjunction with the Congressionally-authorized 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. This five-medal program features designs that pay homage to each branch of the U.S. Armed Forces active during World War I. Check out all the designs, and find out more about the Medals program here.


"People wanted to put the atrocity of the war behind them and get on with their lives." 

Rex Passion

Just over one hundred years ago, a young art student in Philadelphia named Edward Shenton joined the National Guard. Before going to training camp, he stocked up on art supplies, including many canvas-bound sketchbooks. He kept a sketchbok with him every day for the next two years, and drew in them constantly: in training camps, in combat in France, and after the Armistice. When Shenton returned home, he hoped to publish his stories and drawings, but sadly, he found that people only wanted to forget the war. Shenton put his sketchbooks away, and went on to become one of the nation's premier book and magazine illustrators from the 1920s through the 40s. He passed away in 1977 after a fifty-year-long career, and only then did his son find the drawings. Editor/historian Rex Passion has brought Edward Shenton’s Lost Sketchbooks back into light with a book and and a new section of the World War One Centennial Commission's web site. Read more about the amazing legacy of a remarkable artist here.


"The trick is to get all that information to stick in your head and then make it into a nice design."

Transfield

Utah sculptor LeRoy Transfield had two uncles who served in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force, Native Contingent during World War I, so he had a real personal connection to the conflict when he put together his design proposal for the 2018 World War I American Veterans Centennial silver dollar. He'd never sculpted a coin before, "but in the end, I came up with something I was really happy with. When I sent it off, I didn’t know if it was going to do well or not, but at least it was something I could put my name on." He did pretty well: Transfield's design was selected by the U.S. Mint for the 2018 coin that will help fund the National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, D.C. Click here to read more about Transfield's creative process, and how he came up with the winning design.


100 Cities / 100 Memorials Awards Story Goes National

100 Cities 150

Associated Press reported Jennifer McDermott from Rhode Island penned a great article called: "World War I's Neglected Monuments Getting Spruced Up" in which she profiles several of the Round#1 awardee projects.

The article was picked up nationally by a number of metro papers including the LA Times as well as various local publications.

You can read the article and see the pictures on the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials blog.


Texas groups launch "100 Years/100 Schools" Veterans Day Initiative for 2017

Texas Commission

Texas has a great new Veterans Day 2017 initiative, "100 Years/100 Schools", that is being co-sponsored by the Texas World War I Centennial Commission, the Texas Historical Commission, and the Texas State Historical Association. "100 Years/100 Schools" aims to connect Texas schools who typically have some kind of annual Veterans Day ceremony. By linking these events together, the sponsors will help them to tell the story of Texas and Texans in the Great War to school students. Over 190,000 Texans served, and 5,171 of them gave their lives during the war. Read more about the big Texas "100 Years/100 Schools" initiative here.


Locations, dates announced for new Gilder Lehrman Education Program

Education program logos

Last month, we announced our participation in “Teaching Literacy Through History”, a great new professional education program presented by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the nation’s leading American history organization dedicated to K-12 education. The American Legion and the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission have partnered with Gilder Lehman for a special “Teaching Literacy Through History” program focused on World War I. The World War I program has been slated to take place in six cities across the country by the end of the current academic year. This week, those six locations/date are officially announced. Click here to find out when, where, and how teachers can get this WWI training.


Marie Curie and her X-ray vehicles’ contribution to WWI battlefield medicine

Marie Curie mug

Ask people to name the most famous historical woman of science and their answer will likely be: Madame Marie Curie. Push further and ask what she did, and they might say it was something related to radioactivity. (She actually discovered the radioisotopes radium and polonium.) Some might also know that she was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize. (She actually won two.) But few will know she was also a major hero of World War I. In fact, a visitor to her Paris laboratory in October of 1917 – 100 years ago this month – would not have found either her or her radium on the premises. Her radium was in hiding and she was at war. Curie decided to redirect her scientific skills toward the war effort; not to make weapons, but to save lives. Click here to read more about how Curie started an emergency medical revolution that is still saving the lives of both soldiers and civilians even today.


Wisconsin WWI Symposium features top scholars including Sir Hew Strachan

Telzrow

The Wisconsin Veterans Museum is hosting “World War 100: A Centennial Symposium” on October 27-28 in Madison. The event is in partnership with the Wisconsin World War I Centennial Commission, the Wisconsin Historical Society, the War in Society and Culture Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Wisconsin Veterans Museum Foundation. The symposium is open to the public and will honor the centennial observance of World War I, bringing national and international scholars together to examine the Great War and its legacy. To get more information, we connected with one of the hosts for the event, Michael Telzrow, who is Director of the Wisconsin Veterans Museum, which is managed by the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn or on Amazon Echo - Ask: "Alexa, play W W 1 Centennial News Podcast"

Girls collecting peach pits used in gas mask production

Episode #41
Highlights: 

America’s youth goes to war |@01:20

Russia stalls - Germany attacks -Mike Shuster |@08:05

Building the DH-4 bomber |@11:30

WW1 Commemoration flags for Veterans Day |@14:50

DHS and WW1 - Allison Finkelstein and Zack Wilske |@15:40

“World War 100” and “1917: America Joins The Fight” symposia |@23:05

Speaking WW1 - Cushie! |@25:15

100C/100M in Trafford, PA - Andrew Capets |@26:35

WW1CC.org/edu goes live |@31:55

The Lost Sketchbooks - Rex Passion |@32:45

Roll of Honor Foundation - Jerry Michaud |@39:15

WWrite Blog: “God Armeth the Patriot” |@45:35


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise Shop

Merchandise shop jpg

If you are interested in WWI and its centennial commemoration, we have a great way for you to demonstrate your interest to others. GO SHOPPING at the Official Merchandise Store of the United States World War One Centennial.

The shop is filled with unique, interesting and even quirky items that you will find nowhere else.

Items range from wearables, to jewelry, to display items, to music, posters, replica items even limited edition cast statuary.

Many items are very affordable like four dollar bumper stickers or window decals...

and some items are a serious purchase - like our unique replica WW1 era bivouac tent for $2268! 

And everything in between! Display your commemoration proudly and honor our veterans doughboys. 

A portion of all proceeds of every piece of merchandise goes to building America's WWI Memorial in Washington DC.

If you have never been to or it's been a while since you visited - CLICK HERE and take a look around the official WWI Centennial Merchandise Shop.


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Thomas William Butterbaugh 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Butterbaugh

 

Submitted by: Raymond W. Schaffranek

 

 

Thomas William Butterbaugh served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known July 22, 1918 - November 11, 1918.

Thomas William Butterbaugh, the first son of William and Mary (Nagle) Butterbaugh (aka Booterbaugh), was born on December 23, 1894, in Mark Hanna, Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He was working in a coal mine at age 15.

At age 22, he was single, living in Lilly, Cambria Co, PA, and working as a coal miner in Cassandra, PA, when he registered for the military service draft on June 5, 1917.

On July 22, 1918, he was inducted into the US Army at South Fork, PA, and sent to Camp Lee, VA, for training. He served as a Private with the American Expeditionary Forces from September 8, 1918 to November 11, 1918.

On September 8, 1918, he sailed overseas out of Newport News, VA, as part of the 69th Provisional Company August Replacement Draft on the USS Madawaska, which was originally the German steamship Konig Wilhelm II.

Read Thomas William Butterbaugh's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 10, 2017 

Coin

WWI Commemorative Coin design unveiled at Washington, DC ceremony

Hamby coin

On October 9, 2017, the U.S. Mint officially unveiled the design of the new collectible commemorative coin that marks the 100th anniversary of American participation in World War I. The unveiling was hosted by the Acting Secretary of the U.S. Army, Ryan McCarthy, and took place at the National Meeting of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA), in Washington DC. At his side, representing the U.S. Mint, was Mr. T.V. Johnson, the Mint's Director of Corporate Communication, along with Mr. Terry Hamby, the Chair of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission (left). Read more about the design, and when and how this "tangible way to be a part of this special centennial period" will be available for purchase.


"These are the stories of true American heroes and we felt their stories needed to be told."

Thomas Perry

We recently caught up with documentary filmmaker Thomas Perry, to talk about his latest project, Arizona Heroes of World War 1. Thomas has many year experience making military documentary films, and he has a particular interest in World War I. He found rich sources of untold World War I stories in his own home state of Arizona, and decided to showcase them. Read more about how this video came to be, and what Perry learned about Arizona and WWI while making it.


Heroes behind the masks: American sculptor gave WWI soldiers new faces

Ladd

Anna Coleman Ladd was an American sculptor who studied sculpture in Paris and Rome before WWI. After the war broke out, she devoted her time throughout giving soldiers whose faces  were disfigured (by gas, explosives, or other wounds) artistic prosthetic masks. See this London Daily Mail article featuring before and after photographs that show how WWI soldiers’ horrific facial injuries were surgically repaired, then covered with the sculpted prosthetics that Ladd developed. 


Sir Hew Strachan headlines upcoming Symposia at National WWI Museum

Sir Hew Strachan

Coming to the National WWI Museum and Memorial this autumn will be a pair of symposia, featuring world-renowned speakers, including historian, Sir Hew Strachan. The programs will examine the entry of the U.S. into World War I and the conscience objector movement. There will also be a bi-partisan panel discussion on the future of American political parties featuring former Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean. Read more about these two upcoming WWI events here.


How a WWI-era boxcar gift from France moved to a new home in South Carolina

Gratitude Train snip

A historic and ornate World War I-era boxcar donated full of gifts to the state of South Carolina after World War II made a final journey on October 7 from Columbia to Bishopville’s South Carolina Cotton Museum and Lee County Veterans Museum. During both World Wars I and II, the narrow gauge boxcars were a main mode of transportation in France and much of the rest of Europe, moving troops, hauling supplies, and evacuating wounded. The boxcar, part of a 49-car “gratitude train” from France that sent one boxcar to each of the 48 states and the District of Columbia as thanks for the United States’ participation in World War II and America’s aid afterward, has been largely unseen by the public. Read how the relocation to a new home will bring the historic boxcar into view.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Americans join French Foreign Legion years before America enters the war

Episode #40 Highlights:

Ask Alexa: “Play W W 1 Centennial News Podcast” |@ 01:00

Second Liberty Bond drive launches |@ 02:00

Spy ring in Palestine - Mike Shuster |@ 06:25

War In the Sky - RiesenFlugzeug - behemoths of the sky |@ 10:10

Great War Alliance Forum |@ 13:05

Follow up on Cardines Field rededication |@ 13:55

Holding talks about WWI in communities - Richard Rubin |@ 15:15

Speaking WWI -  This week: “Booby Trap” |@ 21:30

100C/100M in Ridgewood, NJ - Chris Stout |@ 23:10

“Rendezvous With Death” - David Hanna |@ 28:30

Pershing/Lafayette statues rededicated in Versaille |@ 34:40

Trek through the Dolomites - WWrtie Blog w Shannon Huffman Polson |@ 36:00

The Buzz on #CountdownToVeteransDay -Katherine Akey |@ 36:55


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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"God Armeth the Patriot."
These words come from Thomas Croft Neibaur, the first Mormon to receive the Medal of Honor during WWI for his heroism during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, one of the bloodiest battles in American military history. 

Writer Benjamin Sonnenberg returns to WWrite this week with another riveting short story, inspired by Neibaur's letters home. Delve into Neibaur's legendary experience in WWI with this captivating, well-researched, fictional narrative. Not to miss!


Running out of time to order your WWI Commemorative flags for "Veterans Day"

Small flag

There is only a month left and the stocks are running low.

We thought we would run the flags one more week for Veterans Day. 

You don't want to pay rush shipping charges and HERE is the only place you can get these official WWI Centennial Commemoration flags.

There is just enough time to order a dozen of these WW1 Centennial Marker Flags for your local remembrance ceremonies.

The durable ground stake nylon flag measures 8 inches x 12 inches and commemorates the centennial of the "War that changed the world". You'll not only be remembering your local WW1 doughtboys, but you'll also be contributing to them all as part of the flag proceeds go to building America's WWI Memorial in Washington DC.

Or proudly fly the full size, 3 foot by 5 foot WW1 Centennial commemoration flag at your Veterans Day ceremony.

Either way, it is now #CountDownToVeteransDay. There is  just enough time to get ready - but stocks are running low! Order your WWI Centennial Commemoration flags today.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.

Flag At Legion Headquarters
Flying in front of the American Legion Headquarters 2017

Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


William "Bill" Connolly 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

william-bill-connolly

 

Submitted by: T. J. Cullinane

 

 

William "Bill" Connolly served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known 1917 - 1919. 

Remembering Our Family’s World War One Veteran

William Alfred Connolly (September 6, 1895 – May 13, 1962)

Long before he was wounded while serving as a Sergeant in the Quartermaster Corps during the First World War, Massachusetts native William A. “Bill” Connolly had somewhat the reputation of a daredevil. Whether he was acting on a dare or fleeing from a ruler wielding harridan of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Joseph, Connolly jumped from a second story window at St. Joseph’s Institute at 43 Green Street in Lynn. He somehow survived unscathed, at least until he returned to school the next day….

Bill was born in Woburn, Massachusetts, the son of Thomas F. Connolly and Ellen (Logue) Connolly. When Bill was just a toddler, his mother died after falling down a flight of stairs. Bill and his younger brother Steve, who would one day become the writer’s grandfather, were taken to the nearby city of Lynn to live with relatives. As we read above, Bill was educated by the Sisters of Saint Joseph, but as they say, “it didn’t take.” When Congress declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, Bill was 21 years of age and living at 45 Eutaw Ave in Lynn.

Read William "Bill" Connolly's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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October 3, 2017

First fifty 'WWI Centennial Memorials' announced by 100 Cites/100 Memorials 

100 Cities 150

On September 27th, the United States World War One Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum & Library announced the first 50 official “WWI Centennial Memorials” from 100 Cites/100 Memorials program. Although the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials program submission period lasted a full year, from July 2016 to July 2017, since the April 6 centennial of the U.S. declaration of war and the subsequent national awakening about World War I, the interest and focus on local WWI memorials around the country has had a large resurgence. Rather than simply extending the submission period, the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials program Executive Committee has resolved to select and to name the first 50 awardees now, and then to re-open a new submission period. Read more about the first round selections, and about round two.


"Make sure that those U.S. service men and women who served are not forgotten by this and future generations."

Jerry Michaud

One of our great partners in the effort to create the new National World War I Memorial is the Roll of Honor Foundation, a nonprofit charity with the mission of honoring the military service of the men and women of America’s Armed Forces, educating the public about their legacy and encouraging public service among the next generation. The Foundation provides the Roll of Honor -- an online registry of U.S. service persons -- which allows former military members and their families to display their military experience, records of achievement and photos in a digital visual biography. In partnership with the United States World War One Centennial Commission, the World War I Roll of Honor features profiles of many of the more than 4 million American service persons who responded to the call of “Over There” in support of the war-weary Allies and helped achieve victory in "The War That Changed the World." We spoke to Jerry Michaud, who created the profile platform for the Roll of Honor Foundation, to hear about their efforts regarding World War I veterans.


"The volunteers' commitment to the cause they were defending rarely, if ever, wavered."

David Hanna

Before America joined World War I, a small group of Americans volunteered for the French Foreign Legion to help defeat the Central Powers. In his book Rendezvous with Death, historian David Hanna profiles seven of these volunteers: a poet, an artist, a boxer, a stunt pilot, a college student, a veteran of the Spanish American War, and an advertising executive. All seven men were united in courage; and some, like poet Alan Seeger, paid the ultimate sacrifice. Now Hanna has built a section about The American Volunteers of 1914 on the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission web site. The Rendezvous with Death site provides additional information, from both American and international sources, about the Volunteers. We talked to David about his book, the new site, what he learned personally while researching the volunteers.


Six U.S. WWI-era railcars rebuilt in France for the Centennial Commemoration

Railcar

Trains and Traction: Le Train des Mouettes, a French train association, is rebuilding six United States World War I railcars. These train cars were originally constructed by U.S. Doughboys from the 35th Engineer Regiment in 1917-1918. 100 years ago, the Doughboys of the 35th Engineers worked to assemble railcars in order to move supplies and men to the front lines. Across France, U.S. Army Engineers would assemble thousands of rail cars, and create a brand new railway system. Train des Mouettes is working to complete all six rail cars before the end of the Centennial. Read more about this rolling tribute to the past help that came to France from the United States in WWI.


Auguste Rodin inspired more emotion in the World War I Memorial sculpture

Howard

2017 year marks the centennial of  sculptor Auguste Rodin’s death. It gives us ample opportunity to re-think this larger-than-life sculptor. Museums around the world are celebrating Rodin’s legacy.  Rodin continues to influence artists today -- including Sabin Howard, the sculptor for The National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC.  Rodin created his later sculptures just before the start of World War I. Read more about how his work continues to act as a bridge for artistic sensibilities a century later.


"A clear breaking point in world history, and American history is no exception."

Cypher

As part of our series on historical resources online, we wanted to showcase a remarkable YouTuber named Cypher, who hosts the channel "The Cynical Historian. Cypher is an offbeat, frank, and fresh, voice in the world of historical review -- and thorough his insight, he has earned a wide & enthusiastic following online, with nearly 40,000 subscribers. His latest episode was one that he produced as a commemorative partner with the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission. The episode discusses the lasting effects of World War I. We asked Cypher to talk about his channel, his current product, and what WWI has to teach us.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

food will win the war

Highlights of Episode #39:

Food Will Win The War |@01:15

Anti-war sentiment and the IWW Union - Mike Shuster |@05:35

“Those Draftin’ Blues” Maceo Pinkard timely tune |@10:00

Terry Hamby elected Chair of the US WW1 Centennial Commission |@12:50

US Mint to introduce their memorial coin design |@14:00

Re-dedication of the Bernado Cardeens Baseball Field in RI |@14:40

Speaking WWI - OMG! Really!? |@16:15

100C/100M First 50 “WWI Centennial Memorials” announced |@17:40

100C/100M Project Profile - Swanton, OH with Mayor Ann Roth |@18:45

Researching Stories of Service with author Christy Leskovar |@24:00

Underwater Archeology - The WW1 Cruiser the USN San Diego |@29:30

WWrite Blog - Poet James Seamon Cotter Jr. by Connie Ruzich |@31:00

A BIG BUZZ this month |@32:00


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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This week's post brings a fresh face to the WWI Italy described in  Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms. Author and veteran, Shannon Huffman Polson, takes us on a spellbinding trek through the Dolomites, where 689,000 Italians perished during the war. Following the footsteps of characters from Mark Helprin's novel, A Soldier of the Great War, Polson's beautiful prose leads us through the stark, striking landscape of one of Italian history's most indelible memories. A stunning narrative not to be missed!


Get your WWI Commemorative flags - just in time for "Veterans Day"

Small flag

It is only 39 days until Veterans Day!

That is just enough time to order a dozen of these fantastic WW1 Centennial Marker Flags for your local remembrance ceremonies.

This durable ground stake nylon flag measures 8 inches x 12 inches and commemorates the centennial of the "War that changed the world". You'll not only be remembering your local WW1 doughtboys, but you'll also be contributing to them all as part of the flag proceeds go to building America's WWI Memorial in Washington DC.

Or proudly fly the full size, 3 foot by 5 foot WW1 Centennial commemoration flag at your Veterans Day ceremony.

Either way, it is now #CountDownToVeteransDay and you have just enough time to get ready! Order your WWI Centennial Commemoration flags today.

Flag At Legion Headquarters

Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Maj. Gen. Walter G. Farrell, USMC

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Maj. Gen. Walter G. Farrell, USMC

 

Submitted by: Dana Tibbitts

 

 

Maj. Gen. Walter G. Farrell served in World War 1 with the United States Marine Corps. The dates of service are: Known 1916-1946.

My grandfather, Major General Walter Greatsinger Farrell, best known as “Great,” joined the Marine Corps in 1917 after a brief stint in the Army. A consummate storyteller, Great fought in WWI and WWII, earning a Silver Star for “exceptional heroism against the Japanese.” Between wars he served in Haiti, Nicaragua, and later China, where he commanded the 3rd Marine Air Wing. In 1945, Farrell reported for duty at El Toro as deputy commander, 11th Naval District Air Bases.

‘Banana Wars’ author Ivan Musicant referred to Great as “the most fascinating man person I’ve ever met.” He was a resident of San Diego for more than 60 years. At the time of his death in 1990, Great was the oldest living naval aviator in the United States, and held two of the few pilot’s licenses signed by Orville Wright.

Read Walter G. Farrell's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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