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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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August 22, 2017

"The women who joined the Corps during WWI were heroines we must continually honor"

Jo-Ann Power

The WW1CC website is full of interesting pages, and incredible resources. As part of our series on what you can find there, we caught up with Jo-Ann Power, who created and curates a special page devoted entirely to the U.S. Army Nurse Corps in World War I. Jo-Ann is author of more than 60 novels, dozens of newspaper and magazine articles plus non-fiction, and she has won awards and acclaim during her decades’ old writing career. During the 1980s, she became interested in the thousands of women who volunteered to join the Army Nurse Corps. Few Americans had ever heard of them, but Jo-Ann found many primary resources at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. and at Carlisle Barracks in Pennsylvania. Believing these brave women deserved wider recognition, Jo-Ann spent weeks examining boxes crammed with unannotated photographs, tattered letters and old microfilms of newspaper articles. She turned that research into a novel, HEROIC MEASURES, which was published in 2013. She also turned her vast knowledge into the amazing web page we have today. Today's Army Nurse Corps was created during the war, and their history is truly remarkable. Jo-Ann brings this story to life through a number of unique and innovative storytelling features.


100 years of the Rainbow Division marked in August 12 ceremony

Rainbow

Veterans and current leaders of the 42nd Infantry Division and the New York Army National Guard marked the 100th anniversary of the “Rainbow Division” with a Saturday, August 12, 2017 ceremony in Garden City, NY, where the division first organized in 1917. In an effort to organize and deploy combat units quickly as the United States entered World War 1, the division was formed from assembling the most ready National Guard units of 26 states and the District of Columbia. Because it would take in units from many states, then-Major Douglas MacArthur, the officer who came up with the idea, said it would stretch across the country “like a rainbow.” Read more about ceremony marking the Rainbow Division's centennial here.


First Division Museum Grand Reopening set for August 26 in Wheaton, Illinois

1st Division

The First Division Museum at Cantigny Park in Wheaton, IL will reopen to the public on Saturday, August 26, at 11 am. The museum began a transformational update last fall. After a ribbon-cutting ceremony, visitors will enter the museum for the first time since Veterans Day 2016. The experience awaiting them features new and updated exhibits plus cutting-edge storytelling techniques. The museum’s reopening coincides with the 100th anniversary of the famed military unit known as the “Big Red One.” It became the first division of the U.S. Army in June 1917, assembling to fight in France in World War I. Read more about the First Division and the museum's new features here.


Historic "Five of Hearts" tank drops into new home at Museum of the U.S. Army

FIve of Hearts

On Tuesday August 15th the team at the U.S. Army Center for Military History placed a Renault FT-17 Tank at the construction site of the upcoming National Museum of the United States Army. The tank followed a remarkable journey, and is a true artifact of World War I. Nicknamed the "Five of Hearts", this tank was given to the U.S. Tank Corps by France during WWI, and is the only known surviving Renault tank used in combat by the U.S. thought to be in existence. Read more about this historic fighting vehicle and its new future home here.


Plans to honor Native American WWI veterans from North Dakota

Native Americans

Even before most Native Americans had citizenship rights, thousands of men from tribes across the country showed their patriotism by volunteering for the military and fighting in World War I. Now, as the nation solemnly marks the World War I Centennial, United Tribes Technical College at Bismarck is planning to honor Native American servicemen from North Dakota tribes who served and sacrificed. The honoring will be held on Sept. 10 during the 2017 UTTC International Powwow at the college in Bismarck. Read more about the ceremony and the World War I memorial on the Native American college campus here.


WW1 Centennial NEWS Podcast

training camp

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week and its about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

EPISODE 33 HIGHLIGHT

Getting ready for training camp  - War Department issues 30 lesson manifesto

RG Head on the War In The Sky - 1917 overview

Richard Rubin & Jonathan Bratton on the Storyteller & The Historian on the Naval Reserve Act

Mike Shuster on the war in the middle east

Speaking WWI: “Thingumyjig”

Anne Taylor & Ruth Edmonson Johnson on 100 Cities / 100 Memorials

Professor Jeff Jakeman on Penrose Vass Stout: Aviator, architect and artist

The eclipse of 1918: What comes around, comes around |@37:00

Susan Werbe on telling the WWI  story with the voice of people

And more…  


U.S. Victory lapel pin

Victory Pin

Proudly wearing the World War 1 U.S. Victory lapel pin is a meaningful way to honor the contributions made for our country one hundred years ago. Soldiers received Victory buttons upon their discharge from service in “the Great War”. Hand cast in jeweler’s alloy and hand finished in a satin bronze patina, the design features the star, symbolizing victory, honor and glory; a wreath of evergreen laurel leaves symbolizing triumph over death; and the U.S. insignia, clearly identifying the country served.

Get your at the official WWI Centennial Merchandise shop.

Check out the many other great commemoration items while you are there.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Oreste Alberighi

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Alberighi

 

Submitted by: Diego Paganini {great-grandnephew}

 

 

Oreste Alberighi served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known From July 26, 1918 to July 3, 1919.

Oreste Alberighi was born on Jan. 27, 1887 in Gradizza, a small hamlet of Copparo in Ferrara district in Italy. His father was Antonio and his mother unknown.

He was stout, with brown hair, grey eyes and he used to smoke pipe. From this habit he got the Italian nickname of « Pipa Calda ».

He left Italy in April 1912 for New York – Stoneco (and then Beacon) to follow the paths of his stepsister Ernesta Novelli Manzolli that had left Italy the year before to settle in the US after her marriage and the birth of her second child.

Oreste Alberighi did his military service as private in Dutchess in 1917-1918. He was naturalized in Spartanburg SC – in June 8,1918. After that during WWI he served overseas in France in the company B 51st Pioneer inf - Army serial number 3,181,515 from July 26, 1918 to July 3, 1919.

Read Oreste Alberighi's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 15, 2017

2017 eclipse spanning U.S. recalls wartime total eclipse 99 years ago

Eclipse

In 1918 newspapers across America, tucked in among reports about U.S. regiments fighting overseas and war bond propaganda, were reports about the Total Eclipse casting the moon’s shadow over the country.  Just as in 2017, in 1918 the path of the eclipse started south of Japan, went across the Pacific Ocean, and then across the United States. And, just as in 2017, Americans were avidly interested in the amazing cosmic phenomena, despite a preoccupation with the war. Click here to see some of the coverage and analysis of the solar eclipse a century ago.


"Let the children themselves take ownership of this important period in their history and heritage!"

Lady Lucy French

"Never Such Innocence" is a non-profit program dedicated to educating young people about the First World War, its impact and legacy. The program takes its name from a line in Philip Larkin’s poem "MCMXIV", which reflects on the changes caused by the First World War. To mark the centenary of the First World War, Never Such Innocence is running an annual poetry and art competition for young people. This year's 2017 edition of the competition explores the different stages of the First World War, and it aims to provide young people with an objective and insightful account of the events that unfolded between 1914 and 1919. It has been designed so that students can select topics that interest them most, and uses poems and artwork from the war period  to help stimulate responses to the competition. We talked to the person who was the vision behind it all, Lady Lucy French.


"These are the stories that stick with people when you talk to them."

David O'Neal

David O’Neal acquired his first artifact when he was 16 years old. It was a 37mm tank round from WWI, dated 1917. Some 40 years later, he is still an avid student of the Great War....and still collecting WW1 artifacts. But now he is restoring priceless relics of World War I back into their original condition, so that their stories can be told to new generations. We caught up with David to see what is going on now at his award-winning WWI Preservation Collection. (In case you were wondering: yes, he still has the 37mm tank round.)


"Patton’s service in World War I is what made him who he was in WWII."

Karlen Morris

A group from the US Army Brotherhood of Tankers (USABOT) is creating a new memorial to those service members 100 years ago who created the tank corps during World War I. The memorial will feature General George Patton, who famously led the experimental tank group during World War, and who would go on to achieve combat victory as the foremost tanker in the world during World War II. The memorial is getting some help from an unusual source -- the people of Bourg, France. Bourg is where General Patton's World War I tank headquarters, and school, was located. The town is very proud of the key role that they played to support those tankers 100 years ago. We discuss the memorial project with Karlen Morris, a retired U.S. Army Master Sergeant, and career tanker.


Governors Island in NYC to host Camp Doughboy WWI weekend Sept. 16-17

Kevin Fitzpatrick

This upcoming September 16-17, Fort Jay on Governors Island, New York, will be hosting Camp Doughboy, a weekend of free events and exhibitions dedicated to commemorate the American participation in the Great War. We caught up with the organizer for the event, Kevin Fitzpatrick. Kevin is the program director of the World War One Centennial Committee for New York City. He’s also the author and editor of seven books tied to city history, including his most recent, “World War I New York: A Guide to the City’s Enduring Ties to the Great War” (Globe Pequot Press). Kevin fills us in an who & what there will be to be seen at Camp Doughboy.


Features from State & Partner web sites

Hawaii Governor David Y. Ige

 

Hawaii

Hawaii's World War I Centennial Task Force gets state support

Hawaii Governor David Y. Ige has signed a letter as the Honorary Chairman, pledging state support to Hawaii's World War I Centennial Task Force.  The task force is the focal point for planning and organizing commemorative events in Hawaii, which contributed significantly to the war effort on both the military and civilian fronts. Hawaii's Centennial Commemoration began on April 2, 2017 and will continue through June 28, 2019. Read more about this official state support here.

Penrose Vass Stout

 

Alabama

New WWI Exhibition Debuts at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts

On July 15, the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH) and the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) debuted a new exhibition at the MMFA in its Weil Graphic Arts Study Center entitled Sketching the Skies: Penrose Vass Stout, Alabama’s WWI Artist-Aviator. The exhibition will be on display through September 10, 2017. Born in Montgomery in 1887, Penrose Vass Stout completed engineering and architecture degrees at Alabama Polytechnic Institute (now Auburn University) in 1907 and 1909.  A member of the 1st Pursuit Group, 27th Aero Squadron, Stout was shot down near Charny during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in September 1918. He received the Distinguished Service Cross for attacking a German artillery installation and battling five enemy pilots. Read more about this great art exhibition here.

Clara D. Noyes

 

Army Nurse Corps

Nurses We Remember:
Clara D. Noyes

Well before the U.S. entered World War I, the War Department and its medical auxiliary, the American Red Cross, sought a carefully guided process to recruit nurses for a global cause – caring for sick, wounded and dying soldiers at home and abroad. By training, by aptitude, and by circumstance, Clara Noyes – Roger Noyes' great-great-aunt and the subject of his new book– was the ideal candidate to help lead what became the first large-scale mobilization of women (20,000 in all) to serve in wartime. Read this author's account of Noyes' significant and enduring contributions to the war effort and the nursing profession here.


WW1 Centennial NEWS Podcast

American Red Cross gives comfort

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week and its about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

EPISODE 32 HIGHLIGHT

The American Red Cross - Part 2

Storyteller & Historian: The Herbert Hoover Food Administration

Mike Shuster: Where did “Doughboy” come from?

Feature: The US Mint WWI Commemorative Coin

NEW: Speaking WWI this week “Slaker”

Event Picks: Portland Maine, Los Angeles

100C/100M: Neil Urban on Veterans of WWI of the USA Monument in Arizona 

Media: Professor Sir Hew Stachan & Catriona Oliphant on Podcast Docudrama - “Enter The Peace Broker”

Articles: National Guard, Rainbow Division and The Wool Brigade 

The Buzz: Katherine Akey on Social Media

And more…  


Get a lapel pin like Admiral Mullen wore on Meet The Press last Sunday

Admiral Mullen lapel pin

Proudly wearing the WWI 100 Years lapel pin is a fantastic way to let the world know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago.

We thank Admiral Mullen for making that choice as he appeared on television's longest running show.

This satin nickel lapel pin is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history.

Get your at the official WWI Centennial Merchandise shop.

Check out the many other great commemoration items while you are there.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Lester W. Chase 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Lester W Chase

 

Submitted by: T.J. Cullinane

 

 

Lester W. Chase served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known 1916 - 1918. 

The First to Fall; a Dreaded Milestone

Private Lester W. Chase, a shoemaker turned soldier, was the first service member from Derry, New Hampshire, to die of wounds sustained in combat during the First World War. Even with the 100th anniversary of his death fast approaching, his name remains firmly rooted in the fabric of the town as his fellow veterans elected to designate their meeting place as the Lester W. Chase Post Nine of the American Legion. Three generations of Legion baseball players have taken to the field with his name emblazoned on their chest, just one example of the community activities conducted in his good name.

Chase was pre-deceased by two Derry soldiers who succumbed to pneumonia. Charles E. Bitgood died in France on February 3, 1918, while assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division’s 15th Artillery Regiment. Just 22 years old, he was buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, in Romagne, France. An excerpt from the Derry Enterprise published on February 12, 1918, contained the following sentiment, “Charles E. Bitgood's memory will ever be honored as being the first soldier boy enlisted from Derry to answer the last roll call on the soil of France, while engaged in the service of his country in that foreign land.”

In spite of this exhortation, it is the memory of Lester W. Chase that remains honored rather than that of Bitgood. Such is the “glamor” of death in combat. As we’ll soon see, the death of Lester Chase was anything but glamorous.

Read Lester W. Chase's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 8, 2017

The National Guard's defining role in WWI

Farewell

Over 100 years ago, on August 5, 1917, the entire National Guard was drafted into U.S. Army service for World War I. This represented the culmination of several steps declared by President Woodrow Wilson that would mobilize the National Guard into the "Great War" and which sent troops into Europe for the first time. This act stands among a series of laws and military decisions in the early 20th century that resulted in the transformation of the National Guard from a traditionally local military organization into professional military force. Read the whole story about this sea change for the National Guard and the nation here.


 Honoring World War I's finest: The Rainbow Division

Rainbow patch

August 12, 2017 will mark the 100th anniversary of the activation of the 42nd New York division. The 42nd was created from National Guard units from 26 different states and the District of Columbia. Douglas MacArthur was the 42nd Division’s Chief of Staff and said that this diverse unit would "Stretch over the whole country like a rainbow." Members of the New York Army National Guard's 42nd Infantry Division will celebrate the Rainbow division's 100th anniversary during a ceremony at the Rainbow Division World War I Memorial located at 96 James St. Garden City, NY on August 12, 2017.


Remembering the Rainbow Division: "A lot of these stories have been forgotten."

Frazer

On August 28 in Montgomery, AL, a Korean War veteran and Silver Star recipient will honor his father and the many others who served in the 4th Alabama National Guard, which became part of the the 42nd Rainbow Division after they were federalized. Rod Frazer, who is also an author and historian, will officially unveil and dedicate a bronze monument marking exactly 100 years since 3,677 Alabama Guardsmen, including his father, William Frazer, hopped onto one of eight trains from Union Station to fight after the United States entered WWI in April 1917. Read this Rainbow Division tribute story here.


"War continues to divide people, to change them forever."

Michael Morpurgo

World War I, often overshadowed by the consequent World War II, rarely finds a spotlight in pop culture. One, seemingly unlikely, story that found mass acclaim and multiple incarnations is the story of a horse serving in France and his owner's attempts to bring him back. The popular 1982 English novel War Horse found itself adapted into a play in 2007 and a blockbuster movie in 2011. Michael Morpurgo, author of over 300 books along with War Horse, spent some time with us to talk about the origins of the story beloved by younger readers that was able to reach such a wide audience.


New World War I website from the DHS’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services History Office and Library

LIberty Loan Poster

There is a great new online resource available from the Department of Homeland Security, that focuses on the World War I centennial. Specifically, this site tells the incredible story of the history of immigration and naturalization in the United States during the war. Site admins Allison Finkelstein and Zack Wilske from the DHS’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services History Office and Library. We caught up with Allison and Zack, and they told us about the site, and their work to create it.


The Wool Brigades of World War One, when knitting was a patriotic duty

Stitch of time

During World War I, there was an overwhelming effort to assist those Americans serving abroad. Before America even joined the war, organizations such as the American Red Cross and the American Fund for the French Wounded had issued pleas for warm clothing for soldiers—or, as a Navy League poster put it, to “Knit a Bit.” After April 1917, the Red Cross and the Comforts Committee worked together to mobilize ever larger numbers of knitters, with a request for 1.5 million knitted garments. The need for warm clothes, particularly socks, was desperate. Men at the front were fighting in the atrocious conditions—muddy trenches and frigid winters—with inadequate footwear. Read about how knitting was promoted as a patriotic duty--and how America's knitters--some surprising--came through in the stitch of time.


Stories of Service: The web page to commemorate individual WWI service

Stories of Service

Did you have someone in your family tree serve in the Great War? You can share their story with us at our Stories of Service page. Just follow this link to the form where you can add someone’s story. Fill out the service member’s name and dates of service (if known). Then select the service member’s branch or type of service. This could be military branches like the Navy or Marine Corps, or it other service groups like the Red Cross, Salvation Army, shipbuilding efforts, foreign air service, etc. Then write a summary of their story, and how they contributed to the war effort. Find out more about how to add your relative to Stories of Service.


WW1 Centennial News Podcast

Horse in mud

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week and its about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Highlight of Episode #31 include:

  • Civil rights march in NYC 100 years ago 
  • Draft dodging, bobbing and weaving
  • Passchendaele: the battle of the  MUD
  • “The Song of Mud” by Mary Borden
  • The Storyteller and the Historian 
  • On being an intern at the US WW1 Centennial Commission 
  • Event Picks of the week
  • 100C/100M Profile - Memorial Park in Mobile Alabama
  • Motorcycles and Memorials 
  • Working on America’s WW1 Memorial
  • Dazzle Camouflage and Peach Pits

LISTEN TO THE PODCAST NOW


The WWrite Blog wants you!

Wwrite Blog Logo  

Our WWRITE blog explores WWI’s Influence on contemporary writing and scholarship.

Would you like to contribute to WWrite? Know someone who could write an awesome post? Want to get students to post or use as a resource? Want to put in requests for topics or themes? Have any comments or suggestions? If you've said yes, then you will want to read this week's WWrite post that explores these questions in detail, Contribute, Share, Teach: All About WWrite. 

Don't miss this opportunity to contribute your voices to this important moment in history! 


U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal

decal

Only $3.95 each. 

This is a great way to start the conversation about the war the changed the world!

Get a stack of these great window decals that features the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI. Proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers

Charles Edward Dilkes

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

Dilks

 

 

 

 

Submitted by: Georgia Harris {daughter)

OUR FATHER, CHARLES EDWARD DILKES, kept a DAILY DIARY of his military service. His memoir, based on this diary, begins with the night of him leaving America. He wrote: "I wish you could share my anticipation with me when on August 6, 1917, at 6:30 p.m. all men were assembled with full field equipment and at 7:00 p.m. we marched through the huge iron gates...full of spirit and hope." Finally arriving in Hoboken, New Jersey, he boarded the transport Finland, dropped down the bay off Tomkinsville, New York, while the "throbbing of engines acquainted us with our departure from the shores of America." It did not take long for the situation to change. A few weeks later on August 20, 1917, his fleet was within the danger zone. "I was coming on deck when a big explosion occurred, shaking the ship...The Captain from the bridge shouted out, "Why the hell don't you shoot that submarine!...Immediately our fore gun blazed away sending forth its deadly shell..."

When the U.S. declared war on Germany in April 1917, our father’s patriotic spirit rose within him; he volunteered on the 1st of May. With an engineering background, he was assigned to Company F as a combat engineer in the 1st Division of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) and fought under the command of General John J. Pershing. He earned the rank of sergeant, and was consistently called upon to lead his men to build first aid stations, communication trenches, and stables; to repair roads and parapets of the trenches; and to prepare the terrain for battle. This work was often done while he and his men were under enemy fire, which often meant putting down the shovel and picking up the rifle. His recordings of daily and significant enemy encounters stand out not only as consistent with history, but offered great personal insight into the rigors of war. He did not complain. He did not shirk his duties EVER in War, in his work, or with his family.

Read Charles Edward Dilks' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.

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August 1, 2017

Treasure trove of WWI film footage coming to video at National Archives

Video

The National Archives houses the largest repository of World War I documents in the United States, and it encompasses not just paper records but also still pictures, microfilm, and motion pictures related to the conflict. Now, miles of seldom-to-never-before-seen film footage is being processed into high definition video and made available on the National Archives’ YouTube channel. Some 1,600 reels of documentary film shot during and after World War I, made at a cost (in today's dollars) of some $55 million, will be free for the public to access online. Read more about this remarkable restoration and distribution project here.


Roses of No Man’s Land online exhibit honors Wisconsin nurses who served 

Wisconsin Nurse

The Wisconsin Veterans Museum opened an online exhibit called The Roses of No Man’s Land, honoring and commemorating these nurses that served during the Great War. Using photos, letters, and personal writing logs, the exhibit features the stories of World War I nurses from Wisconsin, coinciding with the centennial entry of the U.S into the war. The exhibit focuses on the lives of two volunteers who dedicated their lives to help the war effort. Read more about this exhibit to Wisconsin nurses who served during the Great War.


American Society of Landscape Architects following progress of design for WWI Memorial at Pershing Park

Memorial

The American Society of Landscape Architects published an extensive article on their web site recently chronicling the evolution of the design concept for the new national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC, after the approval by the National Capital Planning Commission of the conceptual design in July. The article offers a good review of the issues the plan has encountered as it moves forward toward a dedication on November 11, 2018, the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended the war. Read the entire article here.


“Treasury Raiders” and empty promises: Bonus Marches across U.S. during 1930's

Bonus City burns

The World War I veterans' Bonus March movement was ended by Federal government intervention on July 28, 1932. The Bonus Marches had sprung up across the country in the early 1930s, pitting the American veterans of World War I against their own government. Some 20,000 homeless and unemployed WWI veterans occupied the nation’s capital in May 1932, building an encampment on the bank of the Anacostia River called "Bonus City."  On July 28, Army Chief of Staff Douglas MacArthur directed the military forces that brought "Bonus City" and the demonstrations to an end.  Read more about what many called a betrayal of the American WWI veterans, and how the fallout from the suppression led to new attitudes toward military service.


George Creel's WWI Daily Bulletin is posting daily on ww1cc.org web site

Official Bulletin

One of the remarkable World War I resources and features that can be found on the Centennial Commission website is the daily republication of the Official Bulletin, published daily throughout the war at the behest of President Woodrow Wilson. The Official Bulletin was published to keep Americans informed about the war's progress, and to keep the public emotionally engaged in the overall war effort. Check out this amazing cultural resource of this period in our country.


WW1 Centennial News Podcast

Podcast logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week and its about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Highlight of Episode #30 include:

  • Orville Wright on winning the war with air power 
  • james Higgs Balloon Observer 
  • Mike Shuster on GAS
  • Richard Rubin & Jonathan Bratten on
    building a national army 
  • William C. Gorgas and the Great War in Tuscaloosa, AL 
  • Dr. Libby O’Connell about the history of food
  • Introducing the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials Review Committee
  • David Craig on the Maryland WW1 Centennial Commemoration 
  • Laura Vogt on the National WWI Museum and Memorial in KC
  • Facebook post on the Kodak VPK - vest pocket camera 
  • Shout out to the commission’s summer of 2017 interns 

LISTEN TO THE PODCAST NOW


WW1 Poppy Kits

WW1 Poppy Kit

Get kits for a $64.99 contribution each.

Raise money for your organization, While helping us build the National WW1 Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington DC.

The WW1 Centennial Commission has created “WW1 Poppy kits”. You receive one kit with each $64.99 contribution. Each kit neatly packages 60 poppy seed packets that you can distribute or use to raise money for your organization. 

The cost of the kits allows you to double your money or more. This is a terrific fund-raiser for veteran service organizations, state WW1 centennial organizations, 100 Cities / 100 Memorials projects, or even scout troops, school and churches.

FREE SHIPPING  with no extra shipping or handling fee.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers

Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Thind

 

 

 

 

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind was one of the first Asian Indian soldiers and the first turbaned Sikh to serve in the United States Army during the First World War.

Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind was born on October 3, 1892 in Taragarh, Punjab, British India. Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind arrived to Seattle, Washington on July 14, 1913 on board the ship Minnesota from Manila, Philippines. His younger brother, Jagat Singh Thind died onboard  the ship Komagata Maru, which had been forced to turn back from Canada in 1914 because of country’s racial laws. When the ship returned to India, the British government thought the Indians on board the ship were attempting incite revolutionary activities, and a riot broke up out. Many were killed and jailed, including Jagat Singh Thind. Dr. Thind came to the United States for higher education to become a spiritual teacher and scholar. He made his way to Oregon and eventually settled in California later in life.

Dr. Thind came to the United States for higher education to become a spiritual teacher and scholar. When America entered the war, Dr. Thind was studying at the University of California, Berkeley for metaphysics, spirituality, and religion and it is safe to assume that he wanted to serve his new home and uphold the strong warrior tradition of the Sikh faith. He enlisted in the United States Army when the country entered the war in the 1917.

 

Read Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.

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July 25, 2017

Sabin Howard advances WWI memorial sculpture in Weta Workshop sessions

Sabin Howard

With the unanimous design-concept approval by the U.S. Commission of Fine Art and by the National Capital Planning Commission, in recent weeks, our development of the new National World War I Memorial is in high-gear. Our sculptor, Sabin Howard has taken the design artwork to New Zealand, to work with the incredibly talented artists at the high-tech sculpting studio, Weta Workshop. He took some time to talk to us, and to show us what he has created, and how the sculptural development process will work. Read about the high tech take on an ancient artistic procedure here.


WWI Memorial design concept gains ground with unanimous NCPC approval

Memorial

 On July 13, the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) voted unanimously to adopt the Centennial Commission’s concept design for new national World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. NCPC’s decision followed the other unanimous concept approval on May 18th from the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA), another regulatory agency reviewing the design. Read more about the progress of the memorial to date, and when the next round of regulatory reviews with the CFA and NCPC will tak place.


WWI: "How far we have come, that now we can remember together as friends."

Christoph Bergs

First came engravings, then scrolls, then books, then documentaries. Now, the way history reaches new audiences is through the internet. In this segment previously, we interviewed Youtuber Extra Credits. This week we spent some time with Christoph Bergs, otherwise known online as "Bismarck", who tackles history with a specific lens: aviation history. Bergs, like our previous interview Bernhard Kast, is not an American yet still has covered American military history as told by the military aircraft they employed. Through simulators, games, and visual representations, the way the world does combat in the realm of the sky is Bergs' key interests. He also has had experience working with the Great War, having worked with our French counterpart, the Mission du Centenaire, visiting the battlefields of the Somme and Verdun. We were fortunate enough to spend some time with him, and he additionally has agreed to produce a video on American aircraft during World War 1 for us. Read the entire interview and check out the great graphics here.


100 Cities / 100 Memorials Update

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The 100 Cities / 100 Memorials Grant Application Evaluation Period Has Begun

To evaluate the individual submissions a Review Committee has been assembled, each of whom are assigned a group of submissions to read, review, rate and recommend. 

Once completed in Mid-August, the entire Review Committee will meet so that all committee members have chance to be introduced to all the proposed projects and the final recommendations for the grant awards will be made.

The Review Committee includes representatives of the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, The Daughters of The American Revolution, the National World War I Museum and Memorial in KC, Saving Hallowed Ground, The American Battle Monuments Commission, and the Design Team from the National Memorial at Pershing Park project.

Read all the details and see who is on the committee in the new 100C/100M blog post.


Wwrite Blog:

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The Short Story Behind a Photo by Benjamin Sonnenberg

This week's WWrite post gets inside the mind of the enemy.  Benjamin Sonnenberg writes from the point of view of two of the most important WWI German Generals—Paul von Hindenburg and Erich Ludendorff— who commiserate over a failed military operation. 

The story's inspiration? A famous photo.


WW1 Centennial News Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week and its about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Highlight of Episode #29 include:

  • Launching the Lottery
  • A tale of combat between a merchantman and a U-boat
  • The Russians and the Balkans
  • The Storyteller & The Historian with Dissent in 1917
  • Wrapup on Bastille Day
  • “The Extraordinary Adventures of Colonel Hughes”
  • Governors Island WWI History Weekend
  • “Luck of the Draw”, NZ art projects commemorating WW1
  • Nieuport 11’s Commemorative flight arrive in London:
  • Youtube history hit channel “Extra Credits”
  • Stephanie Trouillard young french journalist

LISTEN TO THE PODCAST NOW


WW1 Poppy Kits

WW1 Poppy Kit

Get kits for a $64.99 contribution each.

Raise money for your organization, While helping us build the National WW1 Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington DC.

The WW1 Centennial Commission has created “WW1 Poppy kits”. You receive one kit with each $64.99 contribution. Each kit neatly packages 60 poppy seed packets that you can distribute or use to raise money for your organization. 

The cost of the kits allows you to double your money or more. This is a terrific fund-raiser for veteran service organizations, state WW1 centennial organizations, 100 Cities / 100 Memorials projects, or even scout troops, school and churches.

FREE SHIPPING  with no extra shipping or handling fee.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Fred Frank Carson

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Fred Frank Carson

 

 

 

 

Submitted by: Kevin Loren Carson

Fred Frank Carson served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The dates of service are: Known June 5, 1918 - Oct 1, 1918.

Fred Frank Carson’s journey from seminary student to the Battle of the Meuse Argonne was a brief one. Fred was born in Prescott, Washington near the Walla Walla River, June 5, 1897. He enjoyed the outdoors and was a fine runner, garnering awards for his speed in competitions.

Fred tried to enlist while he was at Spokane University but was initially rejected. Since he was a seminary student at the school, he was exempt from the draft. But Fred was determined, and he tried several venues until he was inducted into the Army at Camp Lewis, Washington, home of the 91st Division. It was his birthday, June 5th, 1918.

Fred’s Division was variously known as the Pine Tree Division, and the Wild West Division. Some called the soldiers ‘Westers’. The Division drew its strength of 22,000 soldiers from the western states.

Read Fred Frank Carson's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.

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