First Division Monument, Washington, DC

   
South of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building
Near 17th Street NW, across from Corcoran Gallery
Washington
DC
USA
20005
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Division_Monument

October 4, 1924

Cass Gilbert, architect; Daniel Chester French, sculptor

The First Division Monument sits on a plaza in President's Park, west of the White House and south of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) at the corner of 17th Street and State Place, NW. (The EEOB was originally known as the State, War, and Navy Building and then as the Old Executive Office Building.) The monument was conceived by the Society of the First Division, the veteran's organization of the U.S. Army's First Division, to honor the valiant efforts of the soldiers who fought in World War I. Later additions to the monument commemorate the lives of First Division soldiers who fought in subsequent wars. The World War II addition on the west side was dedicated in 1957, the Vietnam War addition on the east side in 1977, and the Desert Storm plaque in 1995. Cass Gilbert was the architect of the original memorial and Daniel Chester French was the sculptor of the Victory statue. Gilbert's son, Cass Gilbert Jr., designed the World War II addition. Both the Vietnam War addition and the Desert Storm plaque were designed by the Philadelphia firm of Harbeson, Hough, Livingston, and Larson. Congressional approval was obtained to erect the First Division Monument and its later additions on federal ground. The Society of the First Division (later called the Society of the First Infantry Division) raised all the funds for the original monument and its additions. No federal money was used. Today, the monument and grounds are maintained by the National Park Service. (Courtesy National Park Service)

 

Single figure -- soldier

Metal (any)

In original location

First Division Memorial Association

$150,000

DC000017

A tall granite shaft with gilded bronze winged figure of Victory at the top. She holds a flag in her raised proper right hand and she extends her left hand in a blessing of the dead. At the base of the memorial are bronze plates inscribed with the names of 5,599 men of the First Division who were killed in World War I. The First Division's campaigns and battle honors are also carved on the column.

John Polachek Bronze & Iron Company

Additions for World War II and Vietnam