gas masks pilots in dress uniforms African American Soldiers 1 The pilots Mule Rearing Riveters African American Officers doughboys with mules

Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Submitting a Monument or Memorial for the Database

This interactive database provides location and all other available information on known World War One monuments and memorials.  Do you know of a World War One Monument or Memorial that is not listed in our database? Do you see incorrect information listed for one of the sites? Do you have photos of one of our listed sites that you want to contribute? Click here to submit the relevant information for inclusion in the database.

Filter:
20 E Magnolia St, Rison, AR 71665
Rison
AR
USA
71665
No additional information at this time.
 
20 Magnolia St.
Rison
AR
USA
71665
Courthouse in Cleveland County, Arkansas.
 
Frankfort
IN
USA
46041
 
 
Veterans Memorial Park, 661 E Davis St
Elba
AL
USA
36323
 
 
201 N Main St
Tuscumbia
AL
USA
35674
 
W 3rd & N Main
Tuscumbia
AL
USA
35674
This memorial is in front of the county court house in honor of the town's 19 who died in WW1.
 
450 E Railway St, Coleman, MI 48618
Coleman
MI
USA
48618

Coleman Veterans Memorial

     In May of 2007 the Zylman Family lost their son Casey in Iraq. They wanted to do something to honor Casey’s memory. Randy Zylman served with the 25th Infantry Division in Vietnam, and Casey also served with the 25th Infantry as a Calvary Scout during Operation Iraqi Freedom. After much thought it was decided that they wanted to honor the Coleman Community and all Area Veterans with something bigger. The Coleman Veterans Memorial Committee was founded.

There are 3 walkways leading into the center of the court yard. It represents the service men and women who answered the call to duty, coming together from all directions, walks of life, and their own personal reasons to serve our nation and become America's defenders.

 The outer circle represents how the individual services circle together to protect our country and how we are unified as one nation and as brothers and sisters. All 5 service flags representing the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard are on the perimeter of the circle.

   "Bricks of Honor" are within the inner walkway. The personalized bricks of those who served our nation, it consists of Coleman community members, Midland County, Isabella County and people all over our country who purchased a brick to honor their loved one or friends who served.

 The Center

   The remaining statues will be a shade of white. This represents the spirits of those who gave their lives in those wars. It also represents their motives were pure when they served. The 3rd Soldiers Statue is from Vietnam Era. His hand is reaching out the shoulder to offer strength. The 4th is from Korea and the 5th is from WWII and our last statue is from WWI to complete our memorial. They are all filing into the court yard to honor and console a brother.

 

We came into service as individuals, we left as brothers and sisters, 
As family, who fought and died for each other. 
So come and visit our memorial! Join us and be a part of something special in our community, help us educate the young members of our community. 


There are 2 other war memorials in the front of the court yard placed on either side of the American Flag. These are the 2 original Veterans Memorials from the VFW memorial. They were moved here from their original resting place to be a part of this special Memorial. Our Nations Flag is centered on the memorials. The POW/MIA Flag is seated to its left and the State of Michigan flag is on the right.

 The Statues are facing away from you as you walk into this memorial so that when you visit our beautiful memorial, you will be walking into the court yard along with the soldiers, taking in all the names of those who served, to those who paid the Ultimate Sacrifice, to pay tribute, honor and reflect with them. This memorial is an educational tool to show what the cost we have paid to be a free nation.

We came into service as individuals, we left as brothers and sisters, 
As family, who fought and died for each other. 
So come and visit our memorial! Join us and be a part of something special in our community, help us educate the young members of our community. 


  


"United by Sacrifice" 
That is the meaning of our memorial. The original stands at the legendary Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, home of the 25th Infantry Division. They have allowed us to share their memorial from across the Pacific! 


Honoring those who served, Dedicated to those who sacrificed!

 
Magnolia
AR
USA
71753
Courthouse in Columbia County, Arkansas.
 
1 Court Sq #3, Magnolia, AR 71753
Columbia
AR
USA
71753
No additional information at this time.
 
 
Victory Drive
Columbus
GA
USA
31903
The route of U.S. Highway 27 from downtown Columbus to the entrance to Fort Benning.
 
Talbotton Road at Midland Street
Columbus
GA
USA
31901
     A historical marker commemorates the first African-American aviator from World War I.  It reads: “Eugene J. Bullard, 1896-1961.  Bullard grew up in a small shotgun style house near this site. His father, William, was a laborer for the W. C. Bradley Company. Eugene completed the fifth grade at the 28th Street School. Shaken by the death of his mother, Josephine, and the near lynching of his father, Bullard left Columbus as a young teenager. In 1912, he stowed-away on a merchant ship out of Norfolk, Virginia. He spent the next 28 years of his life in Europe.  Erected by the Historic Columbus Foundation and Historic Chattahoochee Commission 2007”

     One of ten children of a black man from Martinique and a Creek Indian mother, he stowed away on a ship to Scotland when a teenager.  Settling in Paris, he became a boxer and worked in a music hall.  Enlisting at the outbreak of World War I in 1914, as a volunteer from overseas he was assigned to French colonial troops.  He saw combat on the Somme front as a machine gunner, and later at Artois and the second Champagne offensive.  After heavy losses by the French Foreign Legion, Bullard was allowed to transfer to the 170th Line Infantry Regiment, which eventually was sent to Verdun, where he was seriously wounded in 1916.  After recovering, he volunteered that fall for the French Air Service as an air gunner.  Following training, he received his pilot’s license in May 1917, and flew with the LaFayette Flying Corps, Escadrille N.93 and N.85, taking part in some twenty combat missions.  His reputation grew as the “Black Swallow of Death.”

     When the U.S. entered the war, Bullard stood the medical examination to serve in the LaFayette Flying Corps as part of the American Expeditionary Force, but was not accepted, as only white pilots were allowed to serve.    He served beyond the Armistice, not being discharged until October 24, 1919, and was awarded the Croix de guerre, among 15 awards from the French government.

     Living in Paris between the wars, he worked as a drummer and nightclub manager, eventually owning his own club, gaining famous friends including Louis Armstrong and Langston Hughes.  When Germany again invaded France in May 1940, Bullard fled Paris with his two surviving daughters from a marriage which had ended in divorce.  Volunteering in defense of Orleans, he was wounded, but escaped to neutral Spain and then went to the United States. 

     Never fully recovering from his war wound, and finding that his French fame did not follow him home, he worked for a while as an interpreter for Louis Armstrong.  With a financial settlement from the destruction of his Paris nightclub in the war, he bought an apartment in Harlem.  He was among those attacked and injured during the infamous Peerskill riots of 1949.  His final job was as an elevator operator at Rockefeller Center. 

     In 1954, the French government invited him to participate in the rekindling of the eternal flame at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier under the Arc de Triomphe, and in 1959 he was made a knight of the Legion of Honor.  Spending his final years in relative obscurity and poverty in New York City, he died in 1961 at age 66.  He is buried in the French War Veterans’ section of Flushing Cemetery in Queens, New York.

     On August 23, 1994, 33 years after his death, and 77 years to the day after the physical that should have allowed him to fly for his own country, Eugene Bullard was posthumously commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Air Force.
 
115 S. Moose St.
Morrilton
AR
USA
72110
Courthouse in Conway County, Arkansas.
 
115 S Moose St, Morrilton, AR 72110
Morrilton
AR
USA
72110
No additional information at this time.
 
 
521 E 3 Notch St
Andalusia
AL
USA
36420

November 11, 2004

 
 
Coweta County Courthouse
Newnan
GA
USA
30263
A large plaque in the wall of the old Coweta County Courthouse in Newnan is inscribed “Coweta County Veterans who served in the Great War.”
 
 
702 Houston St.
Flomaton
AL
USA
36441
Medal of Honor recipient and one of Gen. Pershing's "Immortal Ten."
 
300 Main St, Van Buren, AR 72956
Van Buren
AR
USA
72956
No additional information at this time.
 
Crawfordsville
IN
USA
47933
 
 
700 block Montgomery Highway
Luverne
AL
USA
36049
 
705 E. Union Ave
Wynne
AR
USA
72396
No additional information at this time.
 
 
Cullman County Courthouse
Cullman
AL
USA
35055
 

Culver Legion War Memorial

          
Culver
IN
USA
46511
http://www.culver.lib.in.us/legion_war_memorial_program_1924.htm

11/02/1924

The Legion War Memorial Building was a monumental structure with a monumental mission when it was completed and dedicated: to stand as a memorial to war veterans -- both alive and fallen -- from Culver's ranks. Famous for its Gold Star at the entrance and its classical, exquisite architecture, the memorial building, of course, still stands today. The site features an imposing three-floor memorial building with a Gold Star room, Gold Stars on exterior, and a plaque in honor of those Culver academy students (unnamed) killed in the war from the Federation Interalliee des Anciens Combattants at the base of the staircase (presented and dated October 23, 1922).

 
Culver
IN
USA
46511
http://www.culver.lib.in.us/legion_war_memorial_program_1924.htm

November 02, 1924

 
 
Culver
IN
USA
46511

December 07, 1922

Three Memorial Elms were planted for the three Culver Military Academy cadets who died in the First World War.  These were planted in a ceremony attended by General Pershing.
 
301 Veterans Memorial Boulevard
Cumming
GA
USA
30040

Photos Courtesy of Lamar Veatch

This memorial is located at 301 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, one block from City Square. Dedicated in May, 1992, by the City of Cumming, the memorial consists of individual pedestals to the different conflicts.  Each pedestal is topped with bronze replicas of appropriate historical artifacts of that war. 
 

Founding Sponsor

PritzkerMML Logo