Mule Rearing doughboys with mules The pilots African American Soldiers 1 pilots in dress uniforms African American Officers Riveters gas masks

Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Submitting a Monument or Memorial for the Database

This interactive database provides location and all other available information on known World War One monuments and memorials.  Do you know of a World War One Monument or Memorial that is not listed in our database? Do you see incorrect information listed for one of the sites? Do you have photos of one of our listed sites that you want to contribute? Click here to submit the relevant information for inclusion in the database.

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Elsie War Memorial

      
Elsie
MI
USA
48831

Elsie War Memorial

Erected in honor of the men and women of Elsie and vicinity who served in WWI and II 

 
 
605 asbury circle
Atlanta
GA
USA
30307
The older portion of the Dobbs University Center, formerly called the Alumni Memorial University Center, contains a plaque listing the names of Emory alumni who were killed in both World Wars and Korea.
 
 
314 Belleville Ave
Brewton
AL
USA
36426

November 11, 1987

 
 
Gadsden Kiwanis Park, 1296 Noccalula Rd
Gadsden
AL
USA
35904
 

Etowah Memorial Bridge

      
 
E. Broad St.
Gadsden
AL
USA
35902
 

Etowah WW I Memorial

          
Etowah
TN
USA
37331
WW I memorial dedicated to the soldiers of the town of Etowah, Tennessee who lost their lives in the Great War. Their names are listed on the memorial and it is placed in front of the historic L & N Depot in downtown Etowah, TN. It was dedicated in 1922.
 
12 Spring St, Eureka Springs, AR 72632
Eureka Springs
AR
USA
72632
No additional information at this time.
 
359 West Broad Street
Fairburn
GA
USA
30213

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

Unveiled May 21, 1919,  this soldiers monument was erected in Fairburn (Campbell County), in the middle of West Broad Street, to honor those who had died in World War I. The monument was moved to the Holly Hill Memorial Park Cemetery in 1967.  

In 1931, Campbell County was absorbed into Douglas and Fulton Counties.  Fairburn became part of Fulton County.  

The inscription around the globe at the top of the obelisk reads “ Their All For Democracy and Freedom of the World
 

Farley Memorial - Califon

          
Presbyterian Church Cemetery, 443 Route 513
Califon
NJ
USA
07830

This marble sculpture, located within the Presbyterian Church cemetery, was erected in memory of Peter V. Farley who died in battle on September 26, 1918.  The monument consists of a uniformed WWI doughboy, standing at rest, holding the barrel of a rifle with both hands, the butt resting at his feet.  The figure is placed on an attenuated granite base. 

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #NJ000235.

Photos courtesy of:  NJ State Historic Preservation Office

 
801 Locust St
Conway
AR
United States
72034
No additional information at this time.
 
 
Fayette County Courthouse
Fayette
AL
USA
35555

1990

 
Fenton
MI
USA
48430

Fenton World War I Memorial

Long Description:
The park is a small park with a bench and a flag pole.

The plaque reads:
In memory of
Our Heros
in
The WOrld War
1914-1918
who fought for
Liberty and Humanity
dedicated by
Settlers and Michigan Pioneers
Fenton Michigan 
1924"

 

 

Ferndale WWI Memorial

      
Ferndale
MI
USA
48220

Ferndale WWI Memorial

Long Description:
The memorial is a plaque on a rock.

The plaque reads:
"April 6, 1917 HONOR ROLL Nov 11, 1918
A tribute to
Ferndales World War Veterans
who offered all to their country
That Liberty and Justice might not perish from this earth
These made the supreme sacrifice
Paul William Hornaday
Jack Yull
Andrew Robertson
Robert Darch
Fred Metcalf

Centograph with 62 other names

 
 
40 S. Fullerton Avenue
Montclair
NJ
USA
07042

1920

The stained glass nave windows of Montclair, NJ's First Congregational Church were created with the church's construction in 1920 as a memorial to the nine church members who died in World War I. 

Photo courtesy of:  First Congregational Church

 
South of the Dwight D. Eisenhower Executive Office Building
Near 17th Street NW, across from Corcoran Gallery
Washington
DC
USA
20005
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Division_Monument

October 4, 1924

Cass Gilbert, architect; Daniel Chester French, sculptor

The First Division Monument sits on a plaza in President's Park, west of the White House and south of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building (EEOB) at the corner of 17th Street and State Place, NW. (The EEOB was originally known as the State, War, and Navy Building and then as the Old Executive Office Building.) The monument was conceived by the Society of the First Division, the veteran's organization of the U.S. Army's First Division, to honor the valiant efforts of the soldiers who fought in World War I. Later additions to the monument commemorate the lives of First Division soldiers who fought in subsequent wars. The World War II addition on the west side was dedicated in 1957, the Vietnam War addition on the east side in 1977, and the Desert Storm plaque in 1995. Cass Gilbert was the architect of the original memorial and Daniel Chester French was the sculptor of the Victory statue. Gilbert's son, Cass Gilbert Jr., designed the World War II addition. Both the Vietnam War addition and the Desert Storm plaque were designed by the Philadelphia firm of Harbeson, Hough, Livingston, and Larson. Congressional approval was obtained to erect the First Division Monument and its later additions on federal ground. The Society of the First Division (later called the Society of the First Infantry Division) raised all the funds for the original monument and its additions. No federal money was used. Today, the monument and grounds are maintained by the National Park Service. (Courtesy National Park Service)

 
The greenway at the intersection of Deer Run and Curtiss Parkway
Miami Spring
FL
USA

November 13, 1948

This monument commemorates the birth of U.S. Marine Corps Aviation.  Under the leadership of Florida-born Captain Roy S. Geiger, also remembered here, who was the fifth Marine pilot, the “old Curtiss Flying Field” (as it was initially referred to in USMC documents) on the Miami River became the first Marine airbase, housing all four squadrons who are also memorialized by this monument on Curtiss Parkway. Bombing and strafing practice was done over the Miami River Canal and where the nearby Miami Springs Golf Course is today. The 135 Marines trained here served in France and the Azores during WWI.

 

Flame of Freedom

      
220 2nd Ave E
Oneonta
AL
USA
35121

August 26, 1970

Erected by American Legion Post 72.
 
 
Veterans Park Drive
Florence
AL
USA
35630
 

Florence WW1 Memorial

      
Veterans Park
Florence
AL
USA
35630
Historical Marker in Veterans Park
listing 46 Lauderdale County deaths
 
Rome
GA
USA
30161

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

The grave of Private Charles Graves.

A beautiful gravesite of memorial brick pavers and guarded by two machine guns.  Graves was selected as the national "Known" soldier.  He died and was buried in France during World War I. His body was later disinterred and moved to the United States, selected to be buried at Arlington Cemetery alongside the Unknown Soldier. His mother later had his body brought home to Rome where he was buried in the family plot, and finally was reinterred by the American Legion at Myrtle Hill Cemetery. His grave is the center of the New Veterans Walkway.
 
San Francisco
CA
USA
94122

1927

 
4050 South Hulen,
Fort Worth
TX
USA
76109
Marble honor roll of 81 Jewish doughboys was unveiled Nov. 11, 1920, and embedded in a wall at Fort Worth's Hebrew Institute. The marble montage was 10 ft. tall and 8 ft. wide. It was made from 5 tablets. The frieze across the top was inscribed with 2 Jewish stars and 2 American flags. The title reads: TRIBUTE TO OUR BOYS=WORLD WAR=1914-1918. In 1951, the marble montage was broken into 5 slabs and stacked in a storage closet. Rediscovered in 1980, four panels were framed and hung in a garden by the entrance to a Congregation Ahavath Sholom's new synagogue at 4050 S. Hulen. The 5th tablet, inscribed with the dedication date and the sponsors, the Ladies Auxiliary to Hebrew Institute, was discarded. Exposed to wind, sun, and rain, the colors on the monument faded until it was white-on-white and only legible up close. Because of the WWI centennial, it is being restored, with the 81 names inked in . Many soldiers' descendants still live in Fort Worth.

Location:
4050 South Hulen, Congregation Ahavath Sholom, west entrance facing 4800 Briarhaven Lane
Fort Worth, TX, 76116
 
Somerset County Courthouse
Somerville
NJ
USA
08876
http://www.hmdb.org/Marker.asp?Marker=89660

1920

This WWI plaque is mounted on a mortared stone "boulder" on the grounds of the Somerset County Courthouse.  The bronze plaque contains the American Legion logo flanked by L-shaped garlands with flower corner blocks. 

The plaque reads, "To the citizens of Somerville in appreciation of their hospitality in 1917 to the Fourth New Jersey Infantry. We also speak for those who sleep in France."

It was presented by the Fourth Infantry Post of the American Legion on Decoration Day 1920. 

Photos courtesy of: 
"Boulder" - Bill Coughlin & Historical Marker Database
Plaque - RC & Historical Marker Database

 
607 E Main St, Charleston, AR 72933
Charleston
AR
USA
72933
No additional information at this time.
 
211 W Commercial St, Ozark, AR 72949
Ozark
AR
USA
72949
No additional information at this time.
 

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