African American Officers African American Soldiers 1 Riveters Mule Rearing pilots in dress uniforms gas masks The pilots doughboys with mules

Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Submitting a Monument or Memorial for the Database

This interactive database provides location and all other available information on known World War One monuments and memorials.  Do you know of a World War One Monument or Memorial that is not listed in our database? Do you see incorrect information listed for one of the sites? Do you have photos of one of our listed sites that you want to contribute? Click here to submit the relevant information for inclusion in the database.

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Worthington
IN
USA
47471
 
Bloomfield
IN
USA
47424

September 03, 1979

 
 
Greene County Courthouse
Eutaw
AL
USA
35462

1987

 
Bloomfield
IN
USA
47424

1989

 
Greenfield
IN
USA
46140

1923

 
 
Rogers High School, 300 Rogers Lane
Florence
AL
USA
35634
 
 
Michigan City
IN
USA
46360
 
Evansville
IN
USA
47708

November 11, 1923

This bronze tablet memorializes James Bethel Gresham, who was among the first American soldiers to die in World War I and all from Vanderburgh County who died during the war.
 

Gresham Memorial Home

      
Evansville
IN
USA
47711

1920

This home was built for Alice Dodd, the mother of James Bethel Gresham who one of the first three American soldiers to die in World War I.  The house was built as a memorial to Gresham.
 
Downtown Griffin
Griffin
GA
USA
30224
http://www.honorourkia.org/

Photos courtesy of Quimby Melton

Plaques honoring local war dead from all wars are mounted on buildings along downtown sidewalks. Plaques for WW1 dead are shown here.  Additional plaques are planned as previously unrecognized soldiers are identified and documented.
 
Griffith
IN
USA
46319
 
 
Plainfield
IN
USA
46168

July 1928

 
75 Langley Dr.
Lawrenceville
GA
USA
30046

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

     A portion is dedicated to Gwinnett residents who gave their lives during World War I. Gwinnett's Fallen Heroes Memorial pays tribute to all Gwinnett residents who died in the line of duty in military or public safety service.

     From native Americans "who were the first to love this land," to the most recent casualties, the memorial honors about 700 individuals, organized by categories of service. Their names, in random order and without rank, are carved on 13 black granite markers, which are nine feet tall and weigh almost four tons each. A central pedestal features a Gwinnett firefighter's bronze sculpture of an eagle carrying a rose.

 

Habersham Co. – War Memorial

          
Town Square
Clarkesville
GA
USA
30523

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

A marble tablet inscribed with the names of those local residents who served.
 
 
1101 Main St
Greensboro
AL
USA
36744

1991

Erected by the Veritas Club.
 
Noblesville
IN
USA
46060
 
Noblesville
IN
USA
46060

1946

 
Hammond
IN
USA
46320
 
Hammond
IN
USA
46320

November 12, 1923

 
Sparta
GA
USA
31087

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

Sparta is located at 33°17′N 82°58′W / 33.283°N 82.967°W / 33.283; -82.967 (33.2773, -82.9715).

“Dedicated to all the men and women of Hancock County who served their country with respect and honor, and those named here who sacrificed their all”.  

American Legion Post 83, dedicated November 2014.
 
102 South State Street
Greenfield
IN
USA
46140
 
Sloan Park, Main Street
Bloomingdale
NJ
USA
07405

c.1923

JA Meliodion

A World War I soldier stands holding a flag with his left hand, with his right arm extended, hand raised in a "stop" gesture. The soldier wears a helmet and has his sleeves rolled up to his elbows. The copper painted sculpture is mounted on a square base and is surrounded by a low wall.

The memorial complex also includes monuments to other wars. The sculptor, J.A. Meliodon, was from Lincoln Park, NJ.

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #NJ000371. 

Photo courtesy of: Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS)

 
Hardwick
MA
USA
01031

Located in the village of Gilbertville, Hardwick MA features a Great War memorial based on a boulder with mounted plaque and topped by an eagle rampant. In front of it is a large field gun.

 

 

Hart Memorial - Orange

      
BPOE Lodge 135, 475 Main Street
Orange
NJ
USA
07050

1929

Laura Gardin Fraser

This memorial is one of three in Orange, NJ.

It was erected by the Orange Benevolent Order of Elks, Lodge 134, in memory of Private Joseph Hart, the only member of the lodge killed in World War I. The sculpture consists of a bronze depiction of a resting elk  placed atop a stepped granite base measuring approximately 5' 3" by 10'. The base was designed by architect, Albert Randall Ross.

The sculptor, Laura Gardin Fraser, studied art at the Arts Students League in New York City. Best known for her designs for medals, she also designed elk sculptures for several venues including, Chicago's Elks Memorial & the Elks Lodge in New Brunswick, NJ. 

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #NJ000082.

Photo courtesy of: Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS)

 
Hartford
MI
USA
49057

To Our Fallen Heroes in the World War from the village and township of Hartford, Michigan

Orville G. Burkitt
Roy C. Kelly
Fred D. Kellogg
Ralph W. Olds
Clinton Stoddard
Floyd Talpin
Wilbur Whitmore

 

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