Mule Rearing African American Officers Riveters gas masks African American Soldiers 1 The pilots doughboys with mules pilots in dress uniforms

Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Submitting a Monument or Memorial for the Database

This interactive database provides location and all other available information on known World War One monuments and memorials.  Do you know of a World War One Monument or Memorial that is not listed in our database? Do you see incorrect information listed for one of the sites? Do you have photos of one of our listed sites that you want to contribute? Click here to submit the relevant information for inclusion in the database.

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Alton VFW Post 1308, 4445 Alby Street
Alton
IL
USA
62002

November 11, 1922

E. M. Viquesney

 
The northwestern end of Diversey Golf Course, east of intersection of West Briar Place and North Lake Shore Drive
Lincoln Park
IL
USA
61733

1927

E. M. Viquesney

 
Garfield Park
Soldier Field
IL
USA
61733

March 1926

E. M. Viquesney

 
Near American Legion Post 581 (375 E. Locust St.) in Legion Memorial Park on Memorial Drive
Columbia
IL
USA
62236

May 30, 1924

E. M. Viquesney

 
Herrin City Park
Herrin
IL
USA

September 6, 1927

E. M. Viquesney

The left photo was taken at the former Herrin City Park location Northeast of the center of town. The Doughboy was moved in October of 2002 and rededicated the following November 11 at the new location shown on the right in a small downtown plaza area across from City Hall at the corner of North Park Avenue and West Adams Street. A major portion of the move was handled by the National Guard. The plaques honoring veterans were also moved and placed on the wall behind the Doughboy.

 
Burlington Square
Naperville
IL
USA
60540

1926

E. M. Viquesney

 
305 South Perry Street
Attica
IN
USA
47918

November 11, 1927

E. M. Viquesney

(Proper right side of self base:) Spirit of the American Doughboy/copyrighted by E.M. Viquesney, sculptor (Bronze plaque on front of base:) (eagle with wings spread) ERECTED 1927 BY/FRANCIS M. DODGE/WILBERT M. ALLEN/AND OTHER CITIZENS/IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION/OF THE PATRIOTIC SERVICE/RENDERED BY/FOUNTAIN COUNTY/MEN AND WOMEN/DURING THE WORLD WAR/1917-1918 (Rear of base:) FOR GOD AND COUNTRY signed

 
6001 New Harmony Road
Evansville
IN
USA
47720

Nov. 17, 1928

E. M. Viquesney

On base:) SPIRIT OF THE AMERICAN DOUGHBOY/COPYRIGHTED BY E.M. VIQUESNEY/SPENCER INDIANA

 
 
Glasgow Avenue entrance to Memorial Park
Fort Wayne
IN
USA
46803

Nov. 12, 1928

E. M. Viquesney

(On bronze base of sculpture:) SPIRIT OF THE/AMERICAN NAVY/COPYRIGHTED BY/E.M. VIQUESNEY SCULPTOR/SPENSER, INDIANA (On front of archway:) LOYALTY COURAGE SACRIFICE VICTORY ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE/THEIR TRIBUTE/TO THE GLORY OF THEIR SONS (On plaque on inside of archway:) HONOR ROLL/1917-1918/THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME/SACRIFICE IN THE WORLD WAR/FROM ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE (list of names) (On plaque on north side of archway:) ERECTED IN 1928 BY THE CITIZENS OF/ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE/UNDER THE AUSPICES OF COMMITTEES/(list of names)

 
Glasgow Avenue entrance to Memorial Park
Fort Wayne
IN
USA
46803

Nov. 12, 1928

E. M. Viquesney

(On bronze base of sculpture:) SPIRIT OF THE/AMERICAN DOUGHBOY/COPYRIGHTED BY/E.M. VIQUESNEY SCULPTOR/SPENSER, INDIANA (On front of archway:) LOYALTY COURAGE SACRIFICE VICTORY ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE/THEIR TRIBUTE/TO THE GLORY OF THEIR SONS (On plaque on inside of archway:) HONOR ROLL/1917-1918/THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME/SACRIFICE IN THE WORLD WAR/FROM ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE (list of names) (On plaque on north side of archway:) ERECTED IN 1928 BY THE CITIZENS OF/ALLEN COUNTY AND FORT WAYNE/UNDER THE AUSPICES OF COMMITTEES/(list of names)

 
Putnam County Courthouse Lawn
Greencastle
IN
USA
46135

Nov. 11, 1927

E. M. Viquesney

(On bronze plaque on front of base:) PUTNAM COUNTY/REMEMBER (list of names)/AND THEIR CONRADES IN ARMS/WORLD WAR I 1917-1918/DEDICATED NOVEMBER 11, 1927
 
Plant Avenue, Mary and Lott Streets
Waycross
GA
USA
31501

Nov. 11, 1935

E. M. Viquesney

Plaque: DEDICATED TO/THE MEMORY OF OUR COMRADES/WHO ENTERED THE SERVICE/OF THEIR COUNTRY/FROM WARE COUNTY/AND WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES/IN THE WORLD WAR/..../SPONSORED BY/WARE CO. POST NO. 10, AMERICAN LEGION/NOVEMBER 11, 1935

Rear, inscribed below American Legion symbol: Ware County Post No. 10/Nov. 11, 1935/Dr. Paul K. McGee post Com./Doughboy Committee/Dr. Henry J. Carswell Chr./Walter E. Lee. Karl R. Porter/J.A. Rollison. W.D. Waldron./Geo. U. Gates. Clem Hardy./Mrs. Paul K. McGee. Ira Thomas./Mrs. Witherspoon Daniel. signed

 
Blackford county courthouse square
Hartford City
IN
USA
47348

Sept. 1921

E. M. Viquesney

(On bronze plaque on front of base:) HONOR ROLL/DIED IN SERVICE/(list of names)/LEST WE FORGET/THOSE FROM BLACKFORD COUNTY WHO/ANSWERED THEIR COUNTRY'S CALL IN THE WORLD WAR/APRIL 6TH 1917 TO NOV. 11, 1918/OUR BOYS

(On bronze plaque on east side of base: list of names)

(On bronze plaque back of base:) WHEN THE SERVICE FLAG HAS FADED,/AND THE HANDS THAT IT CARESSED/HAVE BEEN FOLDED CALM AND PEACEFUL/ON EACH MOTHER'S LOVING BREAST,/THEN, "THE TORCH THEY PASSED UNTO US"/WE WILL BEAR FOREVER ON,/WITH OUR LIVES WE WILL DEFEND IT/ -WE, LIKE THEY, WILL "CARRY ON."/(list of names)

(On bronze plaque on west side of base: list of names)

 
N. 1st Street and Reid Street
Palatka
FL
USA
32177

1927

E. M. Viquesney

 

The Victor - Woodbury

          
Woodbury High School, N. Broad Street & Newton Avenue
Woodbury
NJ
USA
08096

1924

Robert Tait McKenzie

This World War I memorial of a bronze doughboy is depicted striding forward with his rifle held over his left shoulder and a large pack on his back.  In his extended right hand, he carries his helmet and an olive branch. 

The memorial was erected in 1924 under the sponsorship of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, who raised $10,000 in contributions from the community. 

The figure was designed by Robert Tait McKenzie of Philadelphia; the Indiana limestone base by Paul P. Cret, head of the Department of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania.

Narrative adapted from James D. Carpenteer, “History of Woodbury” (1936) and Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #77002574.

Photos courtesy of:  NJ State Historic Preservation Office

 

The Victory Arch

      
Macarty Square
New Orleans
LA
USA

Following the end of the Great World War, the citizens of the Ninth Ward of New Orleans erected a "Victory Arch." The carved stone arch, reminiscent of the ancient triumphal arches of the the Roman EMpire (such as the Arch of Titus), was originally located in the center of Macarty Square, bounded by Alvar, N.Rampart, Pauline, and Burgundy Streets. In 1951 it was moved to the edge of the squre near Burgundy Street, where it remains today.

Inscription: Erected A.D. 1919 by the people of this the Ninth Ward in honor of its citizens who were enlisted in combative service and in memory of those who made the supreme sacrifice for the triumph of right over might in the Great World War.

 

The War Dog Memorial

      
South Lyon
MI
USA
48178

The War Dog Memorial

The War Dog - Military War Dogs have been fighting alongside our men and women in uniform in many of our conflicts. In WWI they were called Ambulance Dogs, they were trained to find wounded soldiers in No-Man’s land after a frontal attack. In WWII they were trained in many disciplines; scout, tracker, sentry and messenger. According to Military records War Dogs saved 15,000 lives during this conflict.

In Korea there were only one War Dog platoon deployed consisting of about 28 dogs. Of those 28 dogs on patrol, thousands of ambushes were averted. Thousands of lives were saved. In Vietnam further disciplines were added to their training; explosive detection and booby traps. According to the Military they saved 10,000 lives during this conflict. In Iraq their main function were detecting IED's. Their other duties were sentry and road side check points. They continue on duty today in Afghanistan. There are currently 600 teams deployed saving lives every day.

 Today the War Dog is referred to as Military Working Dog (MWD)

 
 
Thorsby Park, Franklin St.
Thorsby
AL
USA
35171

November 11, 2002

Erected by V.F.W. Post 3193.
 

Timothy Ahearn Memorial

          
New Haven
CT
USA
06511

This is the only monument in New Haven produced under the city's WPA art program.

Dedicated to Fair Haven resident Timothy Francis Ahearn in 1937. The monument was sculpted by Karl Lang and installed by Maxwell & Pagano.

Ahearn won the Distinguished Service Cross for heroism at Verdun. Although he survived the war, after returning to New Haven, Ahearn was unable to find work, and traveled across the country as a migrant farm worker.

He died in his 20s in California, and his family buried him in St. Lawrence Cemetery, not far from the monument.

 
Lafayette
IN
USA
47904

1948

 
Tipton
IN
USA
46072

Unknown

 
Tipton
IN
USA
46072

1950

 

Toombs County War Memorial

          
US 280 & Peter Philips Dr.
Lyons
GA
USA
30436
he memorial name is Toombs County War Memorial

Information:
Inscribed with the names of 15 WW1 servicemen. Located between Vidalia and Lyons, GA

Location:
3099 East 1st St. corner of US280 and Peter Philips Dr.
Vidalia, GA, 30474
 
1400 Highway 76 East
Hiawassee
GA
USA
30546

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

The Towns County Veterans Memorial Park is adjacent to the Towns County High School, 1400 Highway 76 East in Hiawassee, GA.  The Park was erected by the Towns County Board of Education and the Student Council, May 28, 1984.
 
Trafford
PA
USA
15085
This memorial was dedicated November 11, 1919. For a complete list of names on the bronze plaque and some photos of these men, please visit TraffordHistory.org
 

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