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Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Memorial Hunters Club

We are building a US WW1 Memorial register through a program called the Memorials Hunters Club. If you locate a memorial that is not on the map we invite you to upload your treasure to be permanently archived in the national register.  You can include your choice of your real name, nickname or team name as the explorers who added that memorial to the register. We even have room for a selfie! Check the map, and if you don't see the your memorial CLICK THE LINK TO ADD IT.

Filter:
Rockville
IN
USA
47872

Unknown

 
 
Dallas Square, behind the Paulding County Courthouse in Main Street in downtown Dallas.
Dallas
GA
USA
30132
A rough-hewn rock inscribed with the names of the county’s war dead.
 
2500 Lake of the Isles Parkway E Minneapolis, MN
Minneapolis
MN
USA
55405

Peavey Fountain on the Lake of the Isles in Minneapolis was built in 1891 as a drinking fountain for horses and was later dedicated to the horses of the 151st Field Artillery, Minnesota National Guard who died during World War I.

The fountain was installed as a monument to the horses of the 151st Field Artillery from World War I. The 151st Field Artillery Regiment was originally organized in 1864 as the First Regiment of the Minnesota Heavy Artillery, was reorganized after the Civil War, became the First Battalion Field Artillery in 1893, was redesignated the First Field Artillery in 1900, was expanded to six batteries in 1903, served on the Mexican Border from 1916 to 1917, and then was drafted into Federal Service and subsequently was redesignated as the 151st Field Artillery. 

http://www.angelfire.com/mn/thursdaynighthikes/lakeisles_arch15.html

In 1891, Frank Hutchinson Peavey donated the fountain to the people of Minneapolis as a drinking fountain for horses. In 1917 it was rededicated as a memorial to the horses of the 151st Field Artillery Minnesota National Guard killed in action. Today, Peavey Fountain would be easy to miss standing in the middle of an island diverting car traffic between Kenwood Parkway and Lake of the Isles Parkway.

I recommend visiting the Minnesota Historical Society website to travel back in time to see what the fountain and neighborhood looked like in the early 1900s. I was curious about the fountain’s connection to Peavey Plaza in downtown Minneapolis and learned that the company Frank started in 1874, F.H. Peavey & Company (renamed Peavey Company) gave $600,000 towards the $2.5 million budget for the plaza which earned them naming rights. The gift was given in 1974, the company’s centennial year.

http://www.southwestjournal.com/focus/2016/10/a-neighborhood-for-all-seasons/

 

Pequot Lakes City Park

          
State Hwy 371 Pequot Lakes, MN 56472
Pequot Lakes
MN
USA
56472
"Vintage marker honoring the area's boys, those who were lost in World War I. The brass marker is corroded with the years but still pays tribute to the fallen. The marker honors those from The World War, not World War I. As at the time, it was the only World War. An eagle is emblazoned on the marker and is flanked by two World War soldiers."
 
Tell City
IN
USA
47586

May 24, 2003

 
Tell City
IN
USA
47586

Unknown

 
 
308 Washington St
Marion
AL
USA
36756

November 11, 1976

Erected by the V.F.W. Post 5104 and Friends.
 
Tell City
IN
USA
47586

November 11, 1991

 

Pershing Point Park

      
Peachtree Street, West Peachtree Street
Atlanta
GA
USA
30309
The memorial honors the fallen heroes from Fulton County, Georgia, and was originally dedicated in 1920 by the War Mother's Service Star Legion, a group of mothers, sisters, and wives of servicemen. The memorial contains the name of each soldier lost during the War.
 
 
corner of Summerville and Airport Rd
Phenix City
AL
USA
36867

September 19, 2009

Erected by the Fort Benning Sergeants Major Association.
 

Pickens Co. -- Memorial Monument

          
in front of the Pickens County Courthouse, Main Street
Jasper
GA
USA
30143

Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

A tall granite tablet marker memorializing those who served. 
 
 
100 Court Square
Carrollton
AL
USA
35447

1927

Civil War, Spanish-American War, and World War I memorial.
 
1901 S Woodrow St, Little Rock, AR 72204
Little Rock
AR
USA
72204
The Picron Memorial is a memorial to Puerto Rican workers who died at WWI weapons plant located at the Cavalry Cemetery.
 

Pierson WWI Monument

          
main street
Pierson
IA
USA
51048

Eight foot tall granite obelisk with bronze eagle on top. Names of Pierson Iowa area citizens who participated in the war are inscribed on side panels.

 
 
Zebulon
GA
USA
30295
Erected by the American Legion.
 

Pike County Courthouse

      
114 N Washington St # A, Murfreesboro, AR 71958
Murfreesboro
AR
USA
71958
No additional information at this time.
 
Petersburg
IN
USA
47567

Unknown

 
 
Town Square Park at the corner of Elm & S. Oak St.
Troy
AL
USA
36081

1921

Erected by the Oliver Wiley Chapter D.A.R.
 
 
4902 Pike Road
Pike Road
AL
USA
36064
 
Lincoln Park
Newark
NJ
USA
07102

1923

Charles Henry Niehaus

This sculpture, placed in Lincoln Park in downtown Newark, was designed by Charles Henry Niehaus, described as one of the foremost monumental sculptors of his generation. 

In 1920, Niehaus received  the commission for this Newark monument. At the base of a tall slender column is a bronze sculpture depicting four soldiers planting a flag. One figure holds the flag about to be unfurled, two figures hold the flagpole in place, and the fourth figure secures the pole at its base. The column is topped by an American eagle. The sculptures rest atop an octagonal base adorned with four reliefs representing Patriotism, Sacrifice, Law and Order, and Fraternity. The base of the sculpture is surrounded by a metal fence.

Niehaus also completed two statues in memory of assassinated President James Garfield.  His first nationally known commission was his 1900 sculpture of Dr. Samuel Hahneman, erected in Scott Circle in Washington, DC. 

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #76001630, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Charles Henry Niehaus." 

Photos courtesy of:  Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS)

 
107 W Broadway St, Pocahontas, AR 72455
Pocahontas
AR
USA
72455
Pocahontas Doughboy Statue by Fred J. Hoppe is located at the Randolph County Courthouse.
 
White Chapel Cemetery
621 West Long Lake Road at Crooks Road
Troy
MI
USA

May 30, 1930

Leon Hermant, sculptor

The Polar Bear Monument is the work of sculptor Leon Hermant and was commissioned by the Polar Bear Association, whose members were veterans of the US Army's 85th Division who fought the Bolshevik Red Army in North Russia during the Allied Intervention in the Russian Civil War, 1918-1919.  

A polar bear advancing menacingly and protectively past a cross with a World War I helmet strapped to it. The sculpture is mounted upon a stepped, castellated base of polished Swedish black granite.

On Memorial Day, May 30, 1930, at White Chapel Cemetery in Troy, Michigan, the remains of forty-five 85th Division soldiers who died in North Russia were re-interred alongside the Polar Bear Monument during a ceremony that included the dedication of the Monument. In later years the remains of eleven more "Polar Bears" who had died in North Russia were re-interred next to the Monument.




In 1988 the Monument and surrounding graves, were recognized as a registered Michigan Historic Site and a state historical marker was erected nearby.  The marker reads as follows (note that the text provides the wrong number of burials that actually took place on May 30, 1930):




THE POLAR BEARS 

(SIDE ONE) 

In the summer of 1918, President Woodrow Wilson, at the urging of Britain and France, sent an infantry regiment to north Russia to fight the Bolsheviks in hopes of persuading Russia to rejoin the war against Germany. The 339th Infantry Regiment, with the first battalion of the 310th Engineers and the 337th Ambulance and Hospital Companies, arrived at Archangel, Russia, on September 4, 1918. About 75 percent of the fifty-five hundred Americans who made up the North Russian Expeditionary Forces were from Michigan; of those a majority were from Detroit. The newspapers called them "Detroit's Own,"; they called themselves "Polar Bears." They marched on Belle Isle on July 4, 1919. Ninety-four of them were killed in action after the United States decided to withdraw from Russia but before Archangel's harbor thawed. 




(SIDE TWO) 

In 1929 five former "Polar Bears" of the 339th Infantry Regiment returned to north Russia in an attempt to recover the bodies of fellow soldiers who had been killed in action or died of exposure or disease ten years earlier. The group was selected by the members of the Polar Bear Association under the auspices of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. The trip was sponsored by the federal government and the state of Michigan. The delegates recovered eighty-six bodies. Fifty-six of these were buried on this site on May 30, 1930. The Polar Bear monument was carved from white Georgian marble; the steps, from white North Carolina granite. The black granite base symbolizes a fortress, and the cross and helmet denote war burial.

 

 

 
 
6800 North Milwaukee Avenue
Niles
IL
USA
60714

This memorial is located outside the administrative office building of the St. Adalbert mausoleum. It features a series of bronze statues depicting servicemembers from different branches.

 
504 Church Avenue
Mena
AR
USA
71953

No additional information at this time.

 
Portage
IN
USA
46368

Unknown

 

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