Mule Rearing The pilots Riveters gas masks doughboys with mules African American Officers pilots in dress uniforms African American Soldiers 1

ILLINOIS AND THE GREAT WAR
April 6, 1917 to June 28, 1919

33rdww1a

Soldiers of the US 132nd Infantry, 33rd Division, holding the line on the west
bank of the Meuse, opposite Consenvoye.  Signal Corps Photo.

A number of Illinois men and women were playing an active role in the World War long before the United States entered the conflict. Some were fighting on the western front, some were Red Cross nurses or welfare workers. Others joined the Lafayette Escadrille (the American aviation unit in the French army), or entered the French Foreign Legion. Records compiled by the Office of the Adjutant General show that Illinois gave 351,153 men to the Army, Navy, and Marines of the United States during the war. Out of every twelve men in the Army one was from Illinois. Illinois furnished more men to the armed forces than any other state in the Union, with the exception of New York and Pennsylvania, both of which had larger populations. The state's own division, the Thirty-third, was the only distinctly Illinois division that saw active service in France.

Money, next to men, was the greatest need of the government and Illinois gave its share and more. About seven percent of the subscriptions received for the nation's war loans, a total of approximately $1,300,000,000 came from Illinois - which, at the time, had about five percent of the population of the United States. Statistics compiled by the State Council of Defense show that the total contributions of the state to various funds raised by war aid and relief organizations was more than $45,000,000. One of the largest Illinois contributions to the war effort by Illinois farmers was the farm crop of 1918. Estimated by the Department of Agriculture to be worth $879,697,000 it was the greatest crop in money value that was ever produced by any state in the Union. As factories were quickly converted into munitions plants the output of Illinois factories in direct war contracts in 1918 was approximately $2,000,000,000.

By the time the War ended, more than 5,000 men from Illinois had given their lives in defense of world freedom and liberty.


LIVESTREAM! WWICC Upper Midwest Regional Meeting Upper Midwest Regional Meeting
September 27 2017


Illinois Speakers' Bureau 

Need a speaker for an event? Here's a list of speakers that can address topics on the First World War.



2017 Illinois World War One Commemoration Events/Activities (October -- December.)

2017 Illinois World War One Commemoration Events/Activities (Oct.-Dec.)

OCTOBER

1, 7, 8 The Evergreen Cemetery Walk (Fee-Based)

 

The theme of this year's Walk is WWI. The Walk will feature the stories of eight McLean County individuals (2 duets, 4 solo performances) who were in some way impacted by the U.S. involvement in WWI. The list of characters may include: Carl and Julia Vrooman; Edward and Lincoln Bynum (both served in the 370th Infantry known as the Black Devils), and Carolyn Schertz Geneva.
McLean County Museum of History, Illinois Voices Theater, Evergreen Memorial Cemetery (Bloomington)
3 Pritzker Military Presents "Steven Rabalais, General Fox Conner, Pershing's Chief of Operations and Eisenhower's Mentor"

 

A 2016 Finalist for the Army Historical Society Distinguished Writing Award, General Fox Conner presents the portrait of the quintessential man behind the scenes in U. S. military history.
Pritzker Military Museum and Library (Chicago) 6:00 pm
21 Eugene V. Debs and Constitutional Liberties, 1895 and 1919, with Ernest Freeberg

 

Ernest Freeberg of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will be talking about Eugene V. Debs and the two United States Supreme Court cases concerning his constitutional freedoms decided in 1895 and 1919. The first Supreme Court decision, In re Debs, sent him to the McHenry County Jail. The second decision, Debs v. United States, upheld Debs' ten-year sentence in federal prison, spent in Moundsville, West Virginia, and Atlanta, Georgia.

 

Debs became a socialist in McHenry County Jail in 1895 partly because of the federal government's support of the railroads and Pullman Company and disregard for the American Railway Union's freedom of association. As a socialist, Debs, in 1918, opposed the participation of the United States in World War One in a speech for which he was prosecuted by the federal government. This prosecution denied his freedom of speech.

 

Freeberg's compelling presentation will be based on his book Democracy's Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent (Harvard University Press).

 

This event is hosted by Woodstock Celebrates, Inc.
Woodstock Public Library (Woodstock) 2:00 – 3:30 pm
23 Pritzker Military Presents "Colonel John House: Wolfhounds and Polar Bears: The American Expeditionary Force in Siberia 1918-1920."

 

Colonel John House, USA (Ret.) visits the PMML to discuss his book about the role the United States played in Siberia during WWI. Sponsored by the United States World War One Centennial Commission.
 

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER Events at Oak Public Library

World War I and America Wednesday, October 4 – Saturday, November 11

 

Explore America's entry into World War I in 1917 through music, author events, lectures, book discussions, film screenings, and more this October and November.

 

FILM SERIES

 

(Wednesdays, 1:30 – 4:30 – Main Library – Veterans Room). Film historian Doug Deuchler screens and discusses films in a six-week series.

 

  • 10/4 All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) See All Quiet on the Western Front, based on the 1928 book by Erich Maria Remarque. Here, in the first major anti-war film made in 1930, a young soldier faces profound disillusionment in the soul-destroying horror of World War I. 133 minutes
  • 10/11 Sergeant York (1941) See Sergeant York, a 1941 film in which Gary Cooper, a southern sharpshooter, is drafted into World War I, despite his claims of being a pacifist, and ends up becoming a war hero. 134 minutes.
  • 10/18 Wings (1927) See Wings, a 1927 silent film with music that won the first Academy Award for Best Picture, in which two men from different social classes fall in love with the same woman and become fighter pilots in World War I. 144 minutes.
  • 10/25 The Dawn Patrol (1938) See The Dawn Patrol, a 1938 silent film starring Errol Flynn and David Niven as British flying aces who must contend with the harsh realities of war. 103 minutes.
  • 11/1 Paths of Glory (1957) See Paths of Glory, an anti-war film in which fiery French colonel Kirk Douglass goes head-to-head with the army's top brass when his men are accused of cowardice. 88 minutes.
 
8 Joyeaux Noel (Merry Christmas) (2005) See Joyeux Noel, in which an unofficial "Christmas Eve Truce" on the Western Front allows soldiers from opposing sides of the war to gain insights into each other's way of life. 116 minutes.  
10/6 World War I and America: Essay Discussion, Part 1

 

Main Library - Second Floor – Small Meeting Room (1:30 – 3:00 PM)

 

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

 

This is the first in a series of three discussions, with readings from:

 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.
 
10/7 Johnnies, Tommies, and Sammies: Music and the World War I Alliance

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (2:00-4:00)

 

Explore the contributions of popular songs from the U.S., Canada, and Britain to the Allies of World War I. This program, presented by musicologists and musical performers, includes slides, films, period recordings, and live performances of sheet music. Six university faculty from Chicago, Urbana-Champaign, Bloomington, and University of York, England, created this program in association with the American Musicological Society and the Library of Congress exhibition World War I: American Artists View the Great War.
 
10/11 World War I and America for Kids: Pickle Preservation

 

Main Library – First Floor – Storytime Room (1:30-3:30)

 

With Cheryl Munoz from Sugar Beet Schoolhouse, learn about the history and propaganda around food during the war, and learn how to make your own World War I-style pickles. Best for ages 4+.
 
10/12 World War I and America Book Discussion: All Quiet on the Western Front

 

Maze Branch – Meeting Room – Maze Branch (1:30-3:30)

 

A book discussion of All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque will be led by Donna Ioppolo. This 1928 book sold 3.5 million copies in the German original and additional 25 translations. Multiple copies of the book will be available in advance at Maze Branch Library.
 
10/15 Author Joe Gustaitis: Chicago Transformed: World War I & the Windy City

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (4:00-6:00)

 

Learn how World War I changed Chicago and how the city helped shape the history of World War I when author Joseph Gustaitis shares photos and stories from his book, Chicago Transformed: World War I and the Windy City.
 
10/17 World War I and America Book Discussion: The Summer Before the War

 

Dole Branch – Meeting Room – Dole Branch (7:00-8:00 PM)

 

It's the summer of 1914, and life in the sleepy village of Rye, England, is about to take an interesting turn as the shadow of the Great War looms ever closer to home. Enjoy a discussion of best-selling author Helen Simonson's historical novel, The Summer Before the War, led by Linda Ivy Miller. This book is full of the same wit, romance, and insight into the manners and morals of small-town British life as the author's beloved Major Pettigrew's Last Stand.
 
10/18 Words on Wednesday: A Farewell to Arms

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Book Discussion Room (1:00-2:30)

 

Refresh your knowledge of the classic title A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army during World War I. Copies are available at the Main Library one month before the discussion.
 
10/20 World War I and America Essay Discussion, Part 2

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Book Discussion Room (1:30-3:00)

 

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

 

This is the second in a series of three discussions, with readings from:
  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.
 
10/24 Robert Mueller: American Doughboys and World War I

 

OFFSITE: Oak Park River Forest History Museum, 129 Lake St., Oak Park (7:30-9:00 PM)

 

In his multimedia presentation "American Doughboys in the First World War," Robert Mueller reviews America's participation in "the war to end all wars." This historian and author takes listeners on a trip across the battlefields of northern France to describe the events, people, and places of America's contribution to the defeat of the German kaiser. Famous engagements such as Belleau Wood, Cantigny, St-Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne are reviewed with images of what the battlefields look like today. Mueller concludes with the enormous changes that the conflict brought to warfare, society, and populations around the world.
 
10/26 World War I and America: Kid Inventors

 

Main Library – First Floor – Storytime Room (4:00 – 5:00 PM)

 

World War I sparked the creation of an abundance of surprising inventions. With our electronic building blocks littleBits, unleash your innovative spirit and make your own unique inventions that you can enjoy in the here and now. Best for children in grades 2-4. Register now.
 
10/28 Author Kathryn Atwood: Women Heroes of World War I

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (2:00-4:00)

 

Kathryn Atwood will share stories of incredibly brave women in her book, Women Heroes of World War I: 16 Remarkable Resisters, Soldiers, Spies, and Medics. A commemoration of brave, yet largely forgotten women who served in the First World War, this book brings to life the often surprising exploits of 16 fascinating women from around the world who served their countries at a time when most of them didn't even have the right to vote. These suspense-filled stories are told through the use of engaging narrative, dialogue, direct quotes, as well as documents and diary excerpts to lend authenticity and immediacy.
 
10/30 World War I: Dr. Paul Herbert: Great Soldiers of the First Division, 1917-1919

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (7:00-9:00 PM)

 

To put a human face on the soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF), Dr. Paul Herbert, Executive Director of the First Division Museum at Cantigny, will share stories of some of the famous or interesting men and women who served with the First Division during World War I. The First Division was a special community that included famous names such as Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and George C. Marshall; tough commanding generals like Robert L. Bullard and Charles R. Summerall; brave soldiers like Lt. Si Parker, who received the Medal of Honor; and characters such as Alban Butler, who, when not fighting, spent the war drawing cartoons.
 
11/3 World War I and America Essay Discussion: Part 3

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Small Meeting Room (1:30-3:00)

 

Join former Marine Corps officer Ed White, who served in Vietnam in 1968-69, to read and discuss a series of essays drawn from World War I and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It. Pick up packets of essays at any Oak Park Public Library location. U.S. veterans as well as interested readers are encouraged to attend.

 

This is the third in a series of three discussions, with readings from:

 

  • Friday, October 6: From a letter by Alan Seeger to Elsie Simmons Seeger.
  • Friday, October 20: From the diary of Vernon E. Kniptash, written between March and April 1919.
  • Friday, November 3: From Henry Cabot Lodge and his speech on the Senate floor about the League of Nations on August 12, 1919.
 
11/4 World War I and America: Today's Veterans Read!

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (2:00-4:00)

 

Hear U.S. veterans from World War II, Vietnam, the Gulf War, Iraq, and Afghanistan read and talk about their military experiences. This program is a collaboration with the Oak Park Vet Center, 1515 S. Harlem, Forest Park.
 
11/5 World War I and America: A Staged Reading with Kevin Bry, Diana Pingle & Graham Weilgos

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (3:00-5:00)

 

Listen to the words of young Ernest Hemingway written to his parents and others from Italy during the early days of World War I. See a staged reading presented by Kevin Bry and Diana Pingle as Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Hemingway. Graham Weilgos will portray young Ernest Hemingway. Local attorney and actor Kevin Bry created the script from The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Vol. 1, 1907–1922.
 
11/9 World War I and America: Author Michael Duffy: From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War

 

Main Library – Second Floor – Veterans Room (7:00-9:00 PM)

 

Meet Vietnam veteran Michael Duffy and hear his story told in his autobiography, From Chicago to Vietnam: A Memoir of War.

 

Main Library - Second Floor - Veterans Room
 
11/11 World War I and America: Oak Park Veterans Day Celebration

 

OFFSITE: Oak Park Arms (11:00 AM – 12:00 PM)

 

Join fellow citizens in commemorating the 100th anniversary of America entering World War I at a public ceremony at the Oak Park Arms Retirement Community, 408 S. Oak Park Avenue. Enjoy short speeches from elected officials and historians, patriotic music, a bugler in uniform, the Oak Park Police Department Color Guard, and more.
 
11/11 World War I and America: Seeing is Believing: Reading American World War I Posters 100 Years Later

 

OFFSITE: Oak Park River Forest History Museum – 129 Lake St., Oak Park (2:00-3:30)

 

See the new Seeing Is Believing: Reading American World War I Posters 100 Years Later exhibit at the Oak Park River Forest History Museum, 129 Lake St, Oak Park. Historical Society volunteer and retired history professor Bob Messer provides a tour through the collection of posters on display in the WWI exhibit as artifacts of what has been called "the poster war"; the first mass media campaign in history aimed at mobilizing Americans to participate in the war, both over there and over here. Messer attempts to put these remarkable images art and propaganda in their wartime context as well as encourages visitors to read them from our perspective 100 years after their creation.
 

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER (Wheaton Public Library)

WHEATON READS: WORLD WAR I

 

Friday, October 13 – Thursday, November 16

 

Wheaton Public Library is proud to bring back our community-wide reading and book discussion program this October and November with Wheaton Reads: World War I. These programs are part of World War I and America, a two-year national initiative of The Library of America presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

 

2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the United States entered World War I. Through the generous World War I and America grant the library has received, WPL hopes to educate the community and honor those who have served. Wheaton Reads encourages residents to read for pleasure, to create community through reading, and to promote the exploration of ideas and knowledge. The featured book of Wheaton Reads is Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms.

 

WPL will be honoring the centennial of the US entering WWI with special events and discussions, as well as prize drawings, film screenings, displays, and more. We especially invite veterans and their families to attend and participate in these programs and discussions and to share their experiences with the community. WPL is also excited to be hosting the traveling display World War I and America this winter from January 1-23 in our Arts and Culture Center.

 

 
PROGRAMS

 

Registration required for the following programs
 
10/17 Earnest Hemingway in WWI (7:00 PM)

 

Bob Glass, Historian of Society and Docent of Oak Park Ernest Hemingway Society, presents on Hemingway's time during WWI.
 
10/19 Living History: General Charles Dawes (7:00 PM)

 

Actor RJ Lindsey portrays General Charles Dawes of WWI and narrates a slide program with animated battle maps, military strategies, and period photos.
 
10/24 WWI Heroes of Wheaton (7:00 PM)

 

Five hundred men from the Wheaton area enlisted to serve their country in WWI, 13 of whom died in service. Join Nancy Flannery of the Wheaton Historic Commission as she presents on Wheaton's local WWI heroes.
 
10/30 Propaganda Posters: A Painting Workshop for Teens (7:00 PM)

 

During WWI, governments of many countries designed and distributed posters to both inspire patriotism and foster an aversion to the enemy. In this hands-on workshop for teens, we'll take a look at these fascinating images then either copy one of the designs or create your own using watercolor pencils under the guidance of art teacher Christine Thornton. Beginners welcome!
 
10/31 WWI and America Panel and Discussion (7:00 PM)

 

Assistant Professor Josh Fulton of Moraine Valley Community College will lead a discussion of WWI and how Illinois was affected, as well as passages from the WWI and America Reader. Veterans and their families are invited and encouraged to share their experiences. All are welcome to this interactive discussion on WWI, the experience of war, and the importance of service.
 
11/1 Tween Program: Eating During WWI (4:00 PM)

 

Grades 3-6: Come experience what it was like to eat while the world was at war. Get a chance to try recipes from 1917.
 
11/2 American Doughboys in WWI (7:00 PM)

 

Military author Robert Mueller reviews America's participation in "the war to end all wars" as he takes you on a trip across the battlefields of Northern France to describe the events, people, and places of America's contribution to the defeat of the German Kaiser.
 
11/5 Songs of WWI (2:00 PM)

 

Musician Roger Kotecki will perform songs of WWI on the guitar with bass and percussion accompaniment.
 
11/9 US First Division in WWI (7:00 PM)

 

Dr. Paul Herbert, Executive Director of the First Division Museum of Cantigny, discusses the history behind the legendary First Division infantrymen of WWI.
 
BOOK DISCUSSIONS

 

Books can be picked up at the Checkout Desk.

 

 
10/25 Wheaton Reads Book Discussion (7:00 PM)

 

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
 
11/2 Tween Book Discussion (Grades 3 – 6) (4:00 PM)

 

Truce: The Day the Soldiers Stopped Fighting by Jim Murphy
 
11/2 Contemporary Book Discussion (7:00 PM)

 

Stella Bain by Anita Shreve
 
11/7 Wheaton Reads Book Discussion (10:00 AM)

 

A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
 
11/8 Contemporary Book Discussion (10:00 AM)

 

Stella Bain by Anita Shreve
 
11/14 Contemporary Book Discussion (10:00 AM)

 

Stella Bain by Anita Shreve
 
FILM FESTIVAL

 

Tickets required and can be picked up at Circulation Desk.

 

 
10/13 The Promise (2016) (1:00 PM)

 

 
10/27 War Horse (2011) (1:00 PM)

 

 
11/1 Wonder Woman (2017) (7:00 PM)

 

 
11/3 Testament of Youth (2014) (1:00 PM)

 

 
11/16 Paths of Glory (1957) (6:00 PM)

 

 
COMING THIS WINTER

 

WWI and America Exhibit

 

January 1 – 23, 2018
 
7 McLean County Home Front During WWI, with Bill Kemp

 

The "Great War" involved a host of home front activities, including war bond drives, food conservation efforts, shipments of Red Cross supplies, parades, and public gatherings to sing patriotic songs. There was also a dark side to the war, including the suppression of the large local German community.
 

Normal Public Library (Normal)

 
7 Chicago's Role in World War One

 

This presentation provides an overview of Chicago and the surrounding area as the First World War began. Join Joshua Fulton as he takes us on a journey on how Illinoisans from all walks of life processed the war, and the experiences they lived from America's entry in 1917 ‘til the war's conclusion. From preparedness campaigns and patriotic exhibitions to grappling with an influenza pandemic, the war remade both Chicago's and American identity. (Outreach Services Program)
7:00 p.m.

Orland Park Public Library (Orland Park)

Room 104 – Meeting Room
7:00 -- 8:30 p.m.

Pritzker Military Museum and Library (Chicago)

9 Pritzker Military Presents "Robert Gerwarth, The Vanquished: Why the First World War Failed to End"

 

Historian and author Robert Gerwarth discusses his book on the epic account of the ethnic and state violence that followed the end of World War I – conflicts that would shape the course of the twentieth century. Sponsored by the United States World War One Centennial Commission.
6:00 p.m.

Orland Park Public Library (Orland Park)

Room 104 – Meeting Room

 

9 Afternoons at OPPL: Howard Knotts: Ace of the Prairie

 

Award-winning historical researcher Tom Emery details the life of Howard Knotts, one of only five World War I flying aces from Illinois. The second-youngest of America's sixty-three aces, Knotts shot down six planes in a month before prolonged captivity in a German prison camp. The program cites numerous letters and first-hand accounts of his life during and after the war to create a fascinating, recklessly brave individual whom one journalist called "100 percent hero." (Outreach Services Program)
2:00 -- 3:00 p.m.

Illinois State University (Normal)

10 Veterans' Day Ceremony

 

Illinois State University will be hosting its annual Veterans' Day ceremony at noon in the Bone Student Center, with Dr. Ross Kennedy as the guest speaker. This year's theme will be the Great War.

 

Bone Student Center
12:00 p.m.

Illinois State Military Museum (Springfield)

11 Great War Encampment Reenactment of trench warfare/life in the trenches by the Illinois National Guard
 
15 WWI Monument Preservation Grant Program DEADLINE The Landmarks Illinois WWI Monument Preservation Grant Program provides funding to WWI outdoor monuments and memorials in Illinois in need of restoration to recover their dedication-era quality and appearance. The grant program was launched in March 2017, shortly before the 100th anniversary of the United States' entry into WWI on April 6, 2017. This program is made possible with generous support from the Pritzker Military Foundation. For information: http://www.landmarks.org/resources/financial-resources/landmarks-illinois-grants-landmarks-illinois/  

DECEMBER

Midway Village Museum (Rockford)

9 Christmas Truce in the Trenches
10:00 -- 11:30 a.m.

Illinois State Military Museum (Springfield)

9 Christmas at the Front

 

The National Guard will recognize what soldiers, from the Civil War through World War II, go through at Christmas time while serving their country.
 

Pritzker Military Museum and Library (Chicago)

14 -15 Opening of Exhibit: "Lest We Forget – the Great War"
 

 

 UNITS COMPOSED WHOLLY OR IN LARGE PART WITH ILLINOIS MEN

33rd Infantry Division Shoulder Flash
 The 33rd Infantry Division was the only distinctly Illinois division that saw active service in France. Activated on July 1917 as a National Guard Division from Illinois at Camp Logan, Illinois, it began operations in France in May, 1918. The Division fought in Le Hamel, the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the Somme offensive, and at St. Mihiel. Losses to the Division were high: 691 killed in action, 6,173 wounded in action. After the end of hostilities, it returned to Illinois, and was deactivated on May, 1919, at Camp Grant in Rockford.



84thDivisionThe 84th Infantry Division was comprised of personnel from Illinois, Wisconsin, and Kentucky. It was formed in 1917, and formally activated in August, 1917. It was deployed to France in October 1918 to serve as a training formation for replacements which would be sent to the Western Front.  At the war's end, the formation was recalled home and, without having seen combat actions, and was inactivated in January 1919.

 

86thBadgeThe 86th Infantry Division saw no combat in World War I. It was activated August, 25 1917 at Camp Grant in Rockford. It went overseas in August 1918, returned to the United States in November 1918, and was deactivated in January 1919. Individual units within the Division, particularly the 171st Infantry Brigade and 172nd Infantry Brigade, were used to reinforce or replenish frontline units.

 

145px 88th Infantry Division SSI

The 88th Infantry Division was comprised of personnel from Iowa, Minnesota, the Dakotas, and Illlinois. It was formed at Camp Dodge, Iowa on August 5, 1917. It shipped overseas on September 7, 1918. While it never participated as a Division, soldiers from its ranks were used to reinforce or replenish frontline units. It lost 12 soldiers killed in action, and 66 wounded in action. It was inactivated on June 10, 1919 at Camp Dodge, Iowa.

 




 

RESOURCES FOR THE STUDY OF ILLINOIS IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR

  • World War One Resources at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library. (LINKOne of the largest collection of World War One reference materials and information in the U.S.
  • World War One Documents at the Illinois State Library. (LINK) A treasury of contemporary official documents and histories, published by the State of Illinois and the Federal Government.
  • Music of the First World War(LINK) The First World War is considered to be the most musical of all of America's wars. This exhibit uses optical musical recognition software to digitize the World War I sheet music in the collection of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library and added it as playable .mp3, MIDI, and AIFF files.
  • The DeWitt County World War I Collection(LINKLetters and service records of men and women of DeWitt County who served in World War I.
  • A University Goes to War, World War I Women. (LINK) The materials in this collection, dating from 1917-1919, document the participation of the students, alumni, faculty and staff of Illinois State Normal University in World War I.
  • Answering the Call (LINK). An online exhibition of digital images of World War I posters held in Illinois State University Milner Library’s Government Documents World War Poster Collection.
  • A Seaman's Diary of World War I (LINK). Sverre O. Braathen (1895-1974) grew up in the Red River Valley of the north, North Dakota. His handwritten diary from his time on the U.S.S. Kearsarge during World War I is part of the Illinois State University Milner Library collection. 
  • Radio station WJBC maintains a digital Memorial Wall (LINK). They provide a section for McLean County and Livingston County residents who served and perished in the conflict of World War I.
  • A history of McLean County. (LINK) McLean County, Illinois, in the World War, 1917-1918. By Edward E. Pierson.

MEMBERS OF THE ILLINOIS COMMITTEE

  • Mr. James Balcer: 11th Ward Alderman (Retired), City of Chicago
  • Mr. Kenneth Barber: Executive Director Cook County, Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Mr. Robert Bland III: Dept. of Homeland Security, Illinois National Guard
  • Mr. Andrew Bullen: Library Automation and Technology Coordinator, Illinois State Library
  • Alderman Edward Burke: 14th Ward Alderman, City of Chicago
  • Ken Clarke: President & CEO, Pritzker Military Museum & Library
  • Dr. Mark DePue: Director of Oral History, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library
  • Theresa A. R. Embrey, Chief Librarian, Pritzker Military Museum and Library
  • Mr. Jay Dogherty: City Club of Chicago
  • Mr. Dave Fornell: WWI Reenactor
  • Dr. William Furry: Executive Director, Illinois State Historical Society
  • Mr. Scott Fuzer: Director, West Monroe Partners
  • Ms. Jeanne Hamacher: Educator
  • Dr. Paul Herbert: Executive Director, First Division Museum
  • Ms. Kristen Hoeker: Special Events Coordinator, Midway Village Museum
  • Mr. Greg Jacobs: WWI Camp Grant Historian
  • Mr. Gary Jenson: Assistant Adjutant, American Legion
  • Mr. Dave Joens: Executive Director, Illinois State Archives
  • Mr. J.D. Kammes: Public Programs Manager, First Division Museum
  • Mr. Edward Kelly: Chair, Military Affairs Subcommittee, Union League Club of Chicago
  • Dr. Carla Knorowski: Chief Executive Officer, Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library Foundation
  • Mr. David Kohn: Executive Director of Public Affairs, Union League Club of Chicago
  • Mr. Brad Leighton: Illinois National Guard
  • Mr. Kevin Leonard: University Archivist, Northwestern University Library
  • Mr. Jan Lorys: Manager, History Muzeum Polskie w Ameryce
  • Lt. Colonel Kevin Lovell: Deputy District Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Enginners
  • Dr. Christopher McDonald: Professor, Social Sciences, Lincolnland Community College
  • Ms. Susan Mennenga: Pritzker Military Museum & Library WWI Centennial Project Manager 
  • Colonel Andrew Mogado: Naval Station, Great Lakes
  • Ms. Emily Muskovitz Sweet: Executive Director, JRC & Government Affairs, Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago
  • Mrs. Alice Palmer: The Palmer Institute
  • Mr. William Pishotta: Director of Veterans Outreach, U.S. Senator Mark Kirk Illinois
  • Mr. Jess Ray: University Registar, Illinois State University
  • Mr. Stewart Reeves: Executive Director, Illinois State Military Museum
  • Mr. George Reinke: WWI Reenactor
  • Dr. Mark Roehrs: Professor, Social Sciences, Lincolnland Community College
  • Ms. Alison Ruble: President & CEO, USO of Illinois
  • Ms. Susan Sacharski: Archivist, Northwestern Memorial Hospital
  • Ms. Adriana Schroeder: Historian, Illinois State Military Museum
  • Mr. Scott Schwartz: Director and Archivist for Music and Fine Arts, Sousa Archives & Center for American Music
  • Captain Dave Truitt: Chicago Marine Heritage Society
  • Mr. Frank Valadez: Exec. Director, Chicago Metro History Education Center
  • Mr. Duane Watts: People Program
  • Dr. John Williams: Professor, Political Science, Loyola University Chicago
  • Mr. Joseph Weishar: Architect, WWI Memorial
  • Mr. Pete Zaper: WWI Historian

 

The Fourth of July Memorial Donation Appeal 

Help us build the National WWI Memorial at Pershing Park in our nation’s capital. We need your help to speak for these American veterans who sacrificed so much, 100 years ago. They are not forgotten if we remember. Thank you!

More information: (LINKand link to a description of the Memorial: (LINK)

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OUR MISSION STATEMENT

Records compiled by the Office of the Adjutant General show that Illinois gave 351,153 men to the armed forces of the United States during the war, the third highest total number. To commemorate the centenary of our involvement in the Great War, the Illinois World War I Centennial Committee has a mission to:

ADVOCATE. Encourage other entities in Illinois to recognize the contributions of Illinois to the First World War.

EDUCATE. Develop tools to educate others about the contributions of Illinois to the First World War.

FACILITATE. Support other entities that are recognizing the contributions of Illinois to the First World War.

ELEVATE. Recognize and celebrate Illinois veterans and civilians for their sacrifices and contributions to the First World War.

PARTICIPATE Join other states in a national effort to recognize veterans and civilians for their sacrifices and contributions to the First World War throughout the United States.


ILLINOIS INSTITUTIONS IN THE GREAT WAR

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A growing number of institutions, companies, and universities are contributing their wartime stories for posterity. Learn more about them here.

 


PRITZKER MILITARY MUSEUM & LIBRARY
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Illinois is fortunate indeed to be the home of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, whose commitment and sponsorship of Illinois and National World War One centenary commemoration efforts has been both tireless and unswerving.


PROCLAMATION ESTABLISHING THE COMMITTEE smCeremonial Proc WWI Centennial


On April 1, 2016, Governor Bruce Rauner issued a proclamation officially recognizing the Illinois World War One Centennial Committee