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FAQs

 

Why are we commemorating the U.S. entry into WWI?

The “Great War” changed the history of our nation, and our world, forever. The World War One Centennial Commission is honoring the heroism and sacrifice of those Americans who served by commemorating the Great War through public programs and initiatives, including the national commemorative ceremony, “In Sacrifice for Liberty and Peace: Centennial Commemoration of the U.S. Entry in World War I.”

When is the national commemorative ceremony?

The national commemorative ceremony will be held on the 100-year anniversary of the U.S. entry into WWI, April 6, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. CDT. 

Where will the national commemorative ceremony be held?

“In Sacrifice for Liberty and Peace: Centennial Commemoration of the U.S. Entry in World War I” will take place at The National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri.

What is the World War I Centennial Commission?

The World War One Centennial Commission was established by the World War I Centennial Commission Act, passed by the 112th Congress and signed by President Barack Obama on January 16, 2013. The Commission is mandated to plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of World War I. The mission is to educate the country’s citizens about the causes, courses and consequences of the war; honor the heroism and sacrifice of those Americans who served, and commemorate the Great War through public programs and initiatives. To learn more about the Commission activities, visit ww1cc.org/tools.

To further the mission, the Commission is leading the effort to build the National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, D.C. to honor the 4.7 million American veterans who served. To learn more about the Memorial, visit ww1cc.org/memorial.

What time does the national commemorative ceremony begin?

The national commemorative ceremony begins at 11 a.m. CDT. The general public must be inside the ceremony gates by 9 a.m. CDT.

Can I attend the national commemorative ceremony?

Yes, a limited number of tickets to attend the event will be offered to the general public based on space available. Guests must register in advance to reserve a ticket.

Please bring your ticket and a valid photo I.D. to the ceremony gates by 9:00 a.m. CDT the day of the event.

Why were only a few Heads of State invited to participate in the ceremony?

The WWICC used the following criteria to select nations invited to actively participate in the April 6 national commemorative ceremony in Kansas City, Missouri:

“Nations under the command of which US soldiers fought until the creation of an independent American Army, and that U.S. Armed Forces fought against.” 

Those nations are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and the United Kingdom. In addition, the Heads of State of all World War I participatory nations were invited to attend, whether their respective nation was sovereign or part of an empire or another nation no longer in existence. 

Who is attending?

Invited guests include the President of the United States, Senators, Representatives, Governors, descendants of U.S. World War I veterans, Heads of State from all World War I participatory nations, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, and many more.