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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

A Tradition of Service Logo 75William Anderson

Submitted by: Nathaniel Jenkins, Jr.

5a6631ecdba2d Croix de Guerre

William Anderson born around 1894, William Anderson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather, William Anderson, a South Carolina native, was a real American War Hero. He was a quiet and warm man, a jack-of-all-trades born in the late1800s, and he lived a humble life in Asheville, North Carolina. He was part of an all-black regiment that fought with French soldiers against the Germans during World War I.

When my mother would take me and my sisters to visit him, he would frequently show us his medal that he had tucked away in an old tarnished tin Sucrets box. The medal, shaped like an Iron Cross backed by crossed swords, was marred with time; and it had an aged green and red ribbon attached. My grandfather would beam with pride every time he displayed the medal, but as little kids we didn’t fully understand the significance of his pride. Apparently, he wanted his grandchildren and great-grandchildren to know what he'd done--and to be proud of him.

Many years later, I discovered that Grandfather Anderson's efforts on the battlefield earned him a coveted French medal, the Croix de Guerre or Cross of War, for bravery in combat action. That's the same honor given Audie Murphy, the most decorated American combat soldier of World War II.

Read more: William Anderson

Frank J. Dunleavy

Submitted by: Ellen Kazimer {Granddaughter}

 

Frank J DunleavyFrank J. Dunleavy was born around 1889. Frank Dunleavy served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather, Frank J. Dunleavy, was drafted in April of 1918. He was 29, and by the time he arrived at the front, the war was over. French soldiers informed him, but he didn’t believe it until he reported to the front.

Frank Dunleavy worked in the Central Records Office in Bourges, France compiling the service records of every soldier in the American Expeditionary Forces. For six months there were 6000 soldiers and five to six hundred women from Great Britain’s auxiliary army corps working in the records office.

My grandfather sent an amusing letter to his family detailing a week of leave touring the Rivera on seven dollars. He slept on the baggage rack of the train, went to a dance where he said the French danced fairly good, toured museums, and watched Charlie Chaplin at the movies.

Read more: Frank J Dunleavy

Thomas J Kehoe

Submitted by: Carl Oprey {Great Nephew}

 

Thomas J. KehoeThomas J. Kehoe was born around 1900. Thomas Kehoe served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1915 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

It begins with the story of a book my mother Patty often talked about, which her uncle supposedly wrote in 1918 and published in New York. However, since he and his brothers were poor street boys from Liverpool, England, it all seemed highly improbable. Together with the fact he would be just seventeen at the time of the publication I dismissed the entire issue as my mother’s aging ramblings. Then I discovered his book, The Fighting Mascot in a Chicago bookstore.

This personal account of World War 1, published in New York in 1918 - ten years before All Quiet on the Western Front - remains the only real-life version published before the end of the war. It later transpired that my great uncle, Tommy Kehoe, aged fifteen when he enrolled, became one of the youngest boy soldiers to fight in The Great War.

Following injury, convalescence and an emotional meeting with King George V upon his return to England, he joined the crew of a cargo liner sailing from Liverpool to New York. It was here that he was discovered giving first-hand talks on street corners about the war still raging in Europe.

Read more: Thomas J Kehoe

Sanco Thompson, Sr.

Submitted by: Sonya R. Grantham {Granddaughter}

 

Sanco ThompsonSanco Thompson, Sr. served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather Sanco Thompson, Sr. from Columbia, South Carolina. He was a member of the 371st Infantry Regiment 93rd Division Colored, WWI and I have found service records for the 369th Harlem Hell Fighters.

My grandfather is buried in the Childs Cemetery in Richland County, South Carolina. The cemetery is located on the grounds of a former manufacturing plant. The site was also the former Wade Hampton Plantation. The Llysander D. Child's purchased the plantation during the Reconstruction Era.

I have restored and documented people that are buried in the cemetery-for nine and have for years - solo. I'm proud to be the granddaughter of a WWI Soldier.

The Cemetery is home to the first and only memorial markers in the United States to memorialize the 371st Infantry Regiment, 93rd Division; Colored of WWI. I plan to make the site into a memorial Park.

Read more: Sanco Thompson Sr.

Henry Schmuck

Submitted by: Darrell Sievert Great Uncle

 

Henry Schmuck was born around 1892. Henry Schmuck served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

HENRY SCHMUCK. Luverne, Minn.

Private, Co. "B," 307th Inf.. 77th Div.

Entered service May 27. 1918.

Trained at Camp Kearney. Cal. Departed

Overseas, August 8, 1918.

Battle: Argonne. Wounded, lost left arm in Argonne,

When: September 26 – November 11, 1918

Read more: Henry Schmuck

Spiro Thomas

Submitted by: Spiro Thomas Grandson

no photo 300

Spiro Thomas born around 1899. Spiro Thomas served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

 

Awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

 

 

 

 

Read more: Spiro Thomas

Frank Elmer Laurent

Submitted by: Kristine Henry {3rd great niece}

Frank Elmer Laurent mug

Frank Elmer Laurent was born around 1889. Frank Laurent served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

My 3rd great Uncle Frank, enlisted in 1917, and trained at near San Antonio with the 90th division. He eventually made his way to New York, and set sail for France on the S.S. Orduna, a ship that had been built by the same company that had built the Titanic. It also happened to be the same ship that Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt's youngest son, over to France.

Frank spent his entire time with the 359th infantry, 90th division, until November 2, 1918. Frank Elmer Laurent died of wounds he received, 2 months after his 29th birthday, during the battle in the Meuse- Argonne sector.

His mom, my 3rd great grandma, travelled over to France to the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery in 1930 with the Gold Star Mothers.

Read more: Frank Elmer Laurent

John A. Dean

Submitted by: Elmer J Bott, Jr. {Legion Post Adjutant}

5bc210c438bbb IMG 4572 mug

John A Dean born around 1893, John Dean served in World War 1 with the the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

John A. Dean was born about 1893, his mother Anna (Kelly) Dean and William Dean were residents of Butler.

John A. Dean enlisted August 31, 1917 in the Ambulance Co #33, which trained at the Van Wyck estate bordering on Lake Apshawa. He then traveled to Syracuse, New York, Allentown, Pennsylvania and lastly Camp Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina for further training.

At Camp Greene his company was incorporated into the 4th Division Regular Army. They left the United States for service overseas on May 13, 1918. In whole or part he served at Belleau Wood, Chateau Thierry, and the Aisne-Marne offensive, St. Mihiel, the Meuse Argonne in France and in the Army of Occupation in Germany.

Read more: John A Dean

Charles William Sutton

Submitted by: Phyllis Johnson {Daughter}

no photo 300

Charles William Sutton born 10/17/1894. Charles Sutton served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My father was the oldest of 10 siblings . WWI - 10/17/904 Registration Card FHL Roll Number 1439779 Corporal and WWII 1942 Draft Card.

I have Final Payment Roll copy July 31, 1919. Pictures of his group was on display at the WW1 Memorial in the basement at Indianapolis and was destroyed by a flood.

Contacted St Louis and was told records were destroyed by fire. 1569758 .

My nephew has dress jacket with Medical Quarter Masters Corps button attached. with 2 strips and tags.

Read more: Charles William Sutton

Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette

Submitted by: Thomas, "T.J." Cullinane {Town Historian}

 

pacquette mugLouis Arthur "Slip" Paquette was born in 1890. Louis Paquette served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

A Derry Shoemaker in the Coast Artillery

Few portraits in the Derry, New Hampshire Great War Soldier’s Album are more compelling than that of Louis Arthur Paquette, late of Battery A, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. Upright and earnest, the handsome young Paquette proudly displays his New Hampshire War Service Medal and First Army artillery patch. “Slip,” as he was popularly known, was born in Derry on December 30, 1890. The town records state that the industrious shoe maker enlisted at age 26 on March 8, 1918.

Like many New England soldiers, he would begin his Army career with recruit training at Fort Slocum, New York. This post was located on David’s Island at the southern end of Long Island Sound in the city environs of New Rochelle.

Soon after completing his training, he was given serial number 402214 and assigned to Battery A of the 71st Coast Artillery Corps. At this juncture, Slip was destined to spend the war manning a huge coastal artillery battery in Boston Harbor’s Fort Strong. This was not to be however, as there was an urgent need for heavy mobile artillery in the American Expeditionary Force deployed in France. Slip’s unit was among those selected to fulfill this demand and soon he would embark on the former Cunard liner S.S. Margha to cross the Atlantic. On a preserved copy of the ship’s manifest, one can see that Slip claimed his brother Albert Augustus Paquette of Box #86 in Derry as his next of kin.

Read more: Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette

Hyman Freiberg

Submitted by: James C. Leichtung {Grand Nephew}

 

freiburg mugHyman Freiberg was born around 1899. Hyman Freiberg served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Second Lieutenant Hyman Freiberg, USNG 131 Infantry, 33d Division.

Member of the American Expeditionary Forces. Killed in action August 9, 1918.

Received the Distinguished Service Cross posthumously July 1919. Interred in Somme American Cemetery. Bony (Aisne), France.

Read more: Hyman Freiberg

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