Riveters African American Officers pilots in dress uniforms African American Soldiers 1 The pilots gas masks Mule Rearing doughboys with mules

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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August 7, 2018 

Bells of Peace gaining new participants nationwide for 11/11/18 observance

Bells of Peace logo vertical

More than sixty community participants have already joined the US World War I Centennial Commission’s initiative, “Bells of Peace”. Americans across the nation will toll bells on November 11, 2018 at 11:00 AM, in honor of the service and sacrifice of the nation’s World War I veterans, led by tolling at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. Joining the national bell tolling is an easy way for you to honor those who fought and died in World War I, and to learn about the Commission’s mission to build a World War I memorial in Washington DC. The Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, started tolling bells in 2014, and we are proud to link our efforts with theirs. Read more about how you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.


US Mint reopens sales of World War I Centennial Silver Medal and coin sets

 

Medals

Collectors can again order the five 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and Medal Sets. Limited to 100,000, the sets launched on Jan. 17 and originally had an ordering deadline of Feb. 20. As reported in Coin World, The United States Mint reopened sales of all five sets at their initial issue price of $99.95 each. There’s no word on how many sets are available or for how long their sales will continue. The medals feature designs emblematic of the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard. Conceived by the U.S. Mint to support the WWI Centennial Silver Dollar Commemorative Coin Program, each medal is paired with a proof WWI dollar and sold as a distinct set. Find out more about this new (and probably last!) opportunity to buy these distinctive and historic commemorative medal and coin sets direct from the United States Mint here.


National World War I Memorial Design Team Gets Green Light from CFA in DC

Memorial snip

The Epoch Times newspaper web site has published an extensive followup article covering the June 19 unanimous approval of the design concept for a new National World War I Memorial by the Washington, DC Commission of Fine Arts (CFA). According to the paper, the CFA approval "marked a breakthrough not only for the World War I monument to be realized, but also for the public presence of figurative art on the world stage." Read the entire thoughtful article by The Epoch Times' Milene Fernandez here.


Purple Heart medal has direct connection to American WWI military experience

Purple Heart

Although the Purple Heart is one of the most recognizable medals the US military offers to men and women in its service, the actual story of the decoration is often overlooked. Some 1.9 million purple hearts have been awarded, but many may be surprised to learn that although its conception began with George Washington himself, the Purple Heart in its current form can only be traced back to 1932, with a direct connection to the American military experience in World War I.  WW1CC intern Aaron Rosenthal takes a look at the story of the modern Purple Heart medal and its WW1 roots here.


Centennial of the WWI combat death of beloved American poet Joyce Kilmer

Joyce Kilmer

Beloved American poet Joyce Kilmer was killed 100 years ago on July 30, 1918, while fighting in France. Kilmer is best known for a poem entitled "Trees," published in a collection entitled Trees and Other Poems (1914). At the time of his death, Kilmer was considered to be one of the leading poets and lecturers of his generation. Kilmer joined the Army soon after the U.S. declared war on Germany in April 1917, but he didn’t have to. At the age of 30 he was older than most, plus he was married with children. But he felt he needed to take part. Read more about the life and tragic death of an American literary icon here.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

The Ambulance in World War I

Ambulance

The major theme for July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 82, was the Ambulance: the experience of Americans who drove one, its effect on battlefield medicine, and even the evolution of the word. In 100 Years Ago, host Theo Mayer provided essential background information on the American Field Service (AFS). Nicole Milano, an archivist and editor at the AFS, joined the show to discuss the vital contributions of that organization during the war. In addition, we combined Speaking WW1 and War Tech into one cohesive, ambulance-focused segment. Click here to read a transcript of 100 Years ago, the interview, Speaking WW1, and War Tech.

Rebekah Wilson and the making of the "Turning the Tide" USPS WWI Stamp

Rebekah WIlson

The U.S. Postal Service recently issued  the new World War I "Turning the Tide" Stamp to help commemorate the centennial of WWI. In July 27th’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 82, former World War I Centennial Commission Director of Operations Rebekah Wilson came on the show to share the story behind  the grassroots campaign for the stamp that started at the fledgling U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's very first official meeting on October 29th, 2013. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Corporal Roy Holtz, US Army: First man entering Germany as he rides a Harley-Davidson motorcycle on 11/12/18

Episode #83
Highlights:

August 1918 Preview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @02:05

Great War Project Blog: Turning Point - Mike Shuster | @17:35

International Report 1: Commemorations in France | @21:55

International Report 2: The Moore Twins step up | @22:58

Remembering Veterans: Rechickenization of France - Tracy Robinson DAR | @25:00

Harley Davidson in WWI - Bill Jackson | @31:20

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Dunmore, PA - Jim Davenport & Louise McLafferty | @37:05

Speaking WWI: Stormtrooper | @43:00

WWI WarTech: Stainless Steel | @45:45

Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @48:50

The Buzz: Commemoration in social media - Katherine Akey | @52:55


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Sgt. Frank Carbaugh's 1918 Poem "The Fields of the Marne"

In August 1918, the tide started to turn towards the end of WWI and so did the subject of WWI poetry. While American Sgt. Frank Carbaugh didn't live to see the Armistice, he immortalized his vision of democracy and peace in his poem "The Fields of the Marne," written while he was in the hospital and published inThe Stars and Stripesclose to his death. This week, WWI poetry expert, Connie Ruzich, returns to WWrite to tell us the compelling story of this brave soldier and unknown poet. Read Connie's compelling post!


Doughboy MIA for week of August 6

Private John Sheridan Minch

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private John Sheridan Minch. Born September 21st, 1901, in Beaver, Ohio, Private Minch was a laborer when he was enlisted in the regular army in October, 1916 at Muskegon, Michigan. Assigned to Company H, 28th Infantry, of what would become the 1st Division, and went to the Mexican Border during the crises there before heading to France with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917. He served with the 1st in the Toul sector, Montdidier Sector and at Cantigny. He was killed in action at Soissons on July 21st, 1918 Nothing else is known at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Mug

White Ceramic WWI Centennial Mug

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can enjoy your favorite beverage in this 15-ounce ceramic mug and honor the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers. On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for this endeavor. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Charles Benjamin Mead

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Charles Benjamin Mead

 

Submitted by: Lola {granddaughter-in-law}

Charles Benjamin Mead served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

MILITARY: Register of Deeds, Wessington Springs, Jerauld County, South Dakota.

Honorable Discharge from the United States Army #5859.

Charles B. Mead 3131541 – Mech Casual Det 324-163 DB Co K 157th Inf.

Said Charles B. Mead was born in Blair, in the State of Nebraska. When enlisted he was 22 7/12 years of age by occupation a carpenter. He had blue eyes, brown, hair, medium complexion, and was 5 feet 9 inches in height.

Following is a production of the handwritten journal Charles Benjamin Mead kept with regard to his military life. The small notebook is in the possession of his daughter, Theone Mead Whitlock, Kalama, WA.

Read Charles Benjamin Mead's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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July 31, 2018

WWI Memorial Charts Path Forward 

Memorial snip

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) web site last week published an in-depth article regarding the approval of the updated design for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC by the Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) at its meeting on July 19. The article quotes a number of CFA members of how the changes to the design persuaded the Commission to give unanimous approval. Read the entire extensive ASLA article here.


National Women’s History Museum Suffragettes Walking Tour in DC highlights WWI connections 

Suffragettes sign

The history of Women's Rights in America, and of World War I are directly linked. Now, to help tell that story, there is a new hidden treasure for those who live near Washington DC or for those visiting: a walking tour presented by The National Women’s History Museum is now occurring every other week on Friday and once a month on Saturday. World War I Centennial Commission intern Miranda Halpin took the tour, and provides a list of the top stops that help explain how the Suffragettes supported both their nation at war and the cause of Votes for Women. Read the entire article here.


The Story of a Successful Trouble Maker

Bogart

Born to a wealthy family, and only ever attending private schools for America’s most elite, this young man was a terrible student, uninterested in applying himself in school or in any extra-curricular activities.  Even so, he was bound for Yale University until misbehavior at the end of his high school career removed college as an opportunity.  With no other good option, young Humphrey Bogart joined the US Navy in 1918, and turned his life around while serving in WWI as "an exemplary sailor." In post-war Hollywood, Bogart became an iconic figure. Read more about Humphrey Bogart in the third of our series on Hollywood and WWI here. 


23 Oklahoma bridges being renamed to honor Choctaw WWI and WWII heroes

Oklahombi

The Choctaw Nation made history earlier this year with the dedication of the Joseph Oklahombi World War I Code Talker Bridge in McCurtain County, Oklahoma. The dedication, attended by the Choctaw Tribal Council, tribal members, local city and county and state officials, is the first of 23 bridges being named after the 19 Choctaw Code Talkers from World War I and four from World War II, by the Oklahoma Department of Transportation, the biggest bridge undertaking in the history of the Department. Read more about the Oklahoma recognition of Joseph Oklahombi (pictured at right) and other Choctaw the Code Talkers here.


'Rock of the Marne' Soldiers earn their moniker, turn tide of war in summer 1918

Marne

America's entry into World War I began with a year-long buildup beginning in April 1917. By late spring and early summer of 1918, that buildup was nearly complete. In response, the Germans launched a series of offensives, desperate to defeat the French, British and other allies. One of the final German pushes occurred in the early morning hours of July 15, 1918, in the Champagne-Marne area of northern France, where German assault troops and artillery pounded the U.S. 3rd Division lines. The weight of the attack came against Col. Edmund Butts' 30th Infantry and Col. Ulysses Grant McAlexander's 38th Infantry. Read more about how the men of these units earned the sobriquet "Rock of the Marne" with their heroism here.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Update from the States: An Interview with the Delta Cultural Center's Drew Ulrich

Drew Ulrich

In July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 81, Drew Ulrich, the curator of the Delta Cultural Center in Arkansas, spoke with host Theo Mayer about a new exhibit honoring Delta region residents who served in the Great War. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.

Photography in the Great War

Photography

In July 20th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 81, we focused primarily on photography: its effect on the war, a modern curation project, and even an addition to our vernacular. Corine Reis, a French public historian, spoke with host Theo Mayer about her WW1 photography blog, Waldo Pierce Goes to War. Later in the show, we dug into the importance of photography to military operations and personal photography among soldiers in WW1 Tech, and examined the word "snapshot." Click here to read a transcript of the interview, followed by WW1 Tech and Speaking WW1.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

A. Piatt Andrew and  Stephen Galatti in front of a row of ambulances at the AFS headquarters in Paris

Episode #82
Highlights: Ambulance

100 Years Ago: Ambulance | @02:15

American Field Service - Nicole Milano | @08:15

Great War Channel: Hemingway - Indy Neidell | @15:00

Great War Project: But Paris is safe - Mike Shuster | @16:05

America Emerges: Who’s fighting where - Dr. Edward Lengel | @19:50

Commission News: WWI Commemorative Stamp - Rebekah Wilson | @25:50

State Update: Michigan “Over There” event features the maquette | @33:30

Spotlight on the media: New book: Good War, Great Men - Andrew Capets | @34:35

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Cape May, NJ - Kathleen Wyatt & Harry Bellangy | @39:30

Speaking WWI & WWI War Tech : Ambulance | @45:10

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @50:05

 

The Buzz - Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey | @53:30


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Of the Dreadnoughts by Jeffrey Hess

Dreadnoughts. A baseball team? A guitar? A band? While Navy veteran and writer, Jeffrey Hess was researching the Cold War for his next novel, he came upon information about Dreadnoughts, battleships used during WWI. This week at WWrite, Hess, author of Beachhead, Tushhog, and the short-story collection, Cold War Canoe Club, navigates us through one of the less familiar stories of WWI about the U.S. Navy and its formidable Dreadnoughts. Read this interesting and compelling post about these massive WWI battleships.


Doughboy MIA for week of July 30

Corporal Clarence Hawkins

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Clarence Hawkins. Born August 17th, 1898, Corporal Hawkins was a Miner in Huntingtonburg, Indiana when he was enlisted in the regular army on November 13th, 1916 at Columbus Barracks, Ohio. Assigned to Company C, 28th Infantry, 1st Division, and went to France with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917. He was killed in action by shell fire on May 30th, 1918 during the Battle of Cantigny, America's first planned offensive action of the war, while going over the top for the 4th time. His remains were buried there on the battlefield where he fell, but later were never located.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

US Victory Lapel Pin

U.S. Victory lapel pin

Proudly wearing the World War 1 U.S. Victory lapel pin is a meaningful way to honor the contributions made for our country one hundred years ago. Soldiers received Victory buttons upon their discharge from service in “the Great War”. Hand cast in jeweler’s alloy and hand finished in a satin bronze patina, the design features the star, symbolizing victory, honor and glory; a wreath of evergreen laurel leaves symbolizing triumph over death; and the U.S. insignia, clearly identifying the country served. Measures 1” diameter. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers

Henry Christian Klindt

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Christian Klindt


Submitted by:
Rebecca Nelson {Granddaughter}

Henry Christian Klindt born around 1894, Henry Klindt served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919. 

Story of Service 

Henry C. Klindt served as an “Automatic Man” in WWI, U.S. Army National Guard, Company E, 130th Infantry, 33rd Division from February 26, 1918 to March 21, 1919, arriving in Brest France on May 16, 1918. 

Prompted by his cousins, he wrote about his war experiences in a letter which is attached. He fought in various places in France and his biggest battle was the Argonne Forest Offensive. He was injured when he fell on his knees on railroad tracks but his buddies picked him and he went on. 

The last battle he was gassed, picked up unconscious and carried by his buddies and woke up in a hospital in Vichey France. By the time he got out, the war was over. Somehow he dodged all the shells and bullets sent his way, survived near starvation and the nonstop noise of shelling; being gassed and dealt with not taking his shoes off for 45 days.

Read Henry Christian Klindt's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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July 24, 2018

Unanimous decision

U.S. Commission of Fine Arts endorses design for National World War I Memorial in DC

The effort to build a new National World War I Memorial in Washington DC gained a major endorsement from the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) on July 19, which voted unanimously to approve the updated design-concept for the Memorial after a status-update presentation by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's memorial project team. 

Hamby-O'Connell

This presentation was a scheduled part of regulatory reviews of the memorial's design concept by oversight agencies, which include the CFA, the U.S. National Park Service (NPS), and the National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). The main presenters were project landscape architect David Rubin, along with Centennial Commission Chair Terry Hamby and Commissioner Dr. Libby O'Connell (pictured at right).

Since Congress designated DC's Pershing Park as the site of the new National  World War I Memorial in 2014, the Centennial Commission has been collaborating with Federal regulatory agencies to design an integrated park and memorial, honoring the more than four million American men and women who served in World War I. Read more about the CFA hearing, the design approval, and what is next for America's National World War I Memorial here. 

Joe Weishaar

The results of the CFA meeting and the approval of the design concept received media coverage across the nation. The Military Times posted a substantial article about the approval and the way ahead for the memorial construction. The Arkansas Gazette published an in-depth interview with Arkansas native and World War I Memorial designer Joseph Weishaar (at left).


Washington Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge becomes Bells of Peace Partner 

"Sacrifice and Devotion" sculpture

On November 11, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. American citizens and organizations will be invited to toll bells in their community to commemorate the 116,516 American men and women who lost their lives during World War One. Participating in this momentous event is the Washington Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge, who will proudly utilize their National Patriots Bell Tower, a prestigious structure complete with 58 bronze bells and a combined weight of 26 tons, to toll its bells Twenty-One times in commemoration of America’s World War One fallen. The Chapel itself has an interesting story, built as a memorial to George Washington and his troops encamped at Valley Forge, it has continued to be a memorial to America’s fallen in every war since. In the case of World War One the Chapel’s statue entitled “Sacrifice and Devotion” (pictured at right) dedicated to the mothers of America who have lost their sons in battle, has become a pilgrimage site for the families of soldiers who never came home from the war. Read more about the Washington Memorial Chapel and its participation in Bells of Peace here.


"'Heroes or Corpses': Captain Truman in World War I" is New Exhibit at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library in MO

Truman mug

“There we were watching New York’s skyline diminish, and wondering if we’d be heroes or corpses,” Harry S. Truman later recalled as he departed New York for the battlefields of France in the spring of 1918. Truman returned a hero, and his service helped set him on the path to the presidency. “‘Heroes or Corpses’: Captain Truman in World War I” tells the captivating story of Truman’s service in the Great War through never-before-exhibited photographs, personal letters and more than 40 artifacts from Truman’s personal World War I collection. Read more about this extraordinary exhibit at the Truman Presidential library here.


Centennial of the World War I sinking of USS San Diego off Long Island, NY

USS San Diego

This week marks the centennial of the sinking of the USS San Diego, off the coast of Long Island NY. Mystery surrounds the sinking to the day, but the initial investigation placed likely blame on a sea-borne mine planted by a German U-Boat. Six U.S. Navy sailors lost their lives in the tragedy.  A story  created by the staff of the U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command, as part of their special online portal of resources related to World War I, tells the history of the San Diego, the tragedy of her sinking, and how her wreck off Long Island remains a dangerous place to visit for divers 100 years later. Read this absorbing in-depth article here.


Carnoustie Golf Club, The British Open, Tommy Armour, and World War I

Tommy Armour

With this past weekend’s Open Championship at Scotland's famous Carnoustie Golf Links, we look back to the first British Open ever played at Carnoustie in 1931, to tell the story of its champion, Tommy Armour. Few people know that Armour, dubbed the “Silver Scott”, was a World War I hero -- who took up golf to help recover from his significant war wounds. Read how Armour distinguished himself on the battlefield and how the grit and determination that he gained from combat were applied to his golf game, resulting in a man with different legacies on both sides of the Atlantic.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Legion Post in Saugerties, NY builds permanent WWI memorial room

Saugerties, NY WWI room

In July 13th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 80, Lisa Polay, Vince Buono, and Bill Payne spoke with host Theo Mayer about the World War I centennial room at American Legion Post 72 in Saugerties, NY, built as a permanent exhibit to commemorate the town's World War I veterans. Read the transcript of this interview from the podcast here.

Remembering Veterans and Stories of Service: Interview with Deborah Dudek

Deborah Dudek

In July 13th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 80, genealogy expert Deborah Dudek (right) spoke with host Theo Mayer about researching family members who served in the war. Additionally, Theo Mayer explains how anyone can upload their ancestor's information to our Stories of Service page. Read the transcript of this interview from the podcast here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Picture This! Capturing WWI in moving and still images

Picture This!
Episode #81
Highlights:

100 Years Ago: From state militias to a huge standing army | @02:15

Great War Project: Gas by railroad - Mike Shuster | @11:55

America Emerges: Battle of Soisson - Dr. Edward Lengel | @15:50

Commission News: CFA Reviews Nat. WWI Memorial project | @22:25

Update from the States: Exhibit in Helena Arkansas - Drew Ulrich | @25:20

Spotlight on the Media: Waldo Pierce Goes to War - Corine Reiss | @30:30

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Yuma Arizona - Mayor Nichols & John Courtis | @35:25

WWI WarTech: Imaging in WWI | @41:45

Speaking WWI: Snapshot | @46:30

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch | @48:00

Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @50:40


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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F. Scott Fitzgerald and WWI: The "Crack Up" Essays.

F. Scott Fitzgerald never got shipped out to fight in WWI, but the brush with combat influenced his life and writing forever. While Fitzgerald is known for his short stories and novels, the invisible wounds of living through war on the home front comes through most poignantly in his non-fiction work.This week on WWrite, former Army infantryman in Afghanistan and writer, Colin D. Halloran, discusses Fitzgerald's painful experiences by looking at the lesser-known "Crack Up" personal essays, published in Esquire in 1936. Halloran, who has explored PTSD and post-traumatic growth in his works, Shortly Thereafter and Icarian Flux, walks us through Fitzgerald's post-WWI emotional journey.


Doughboy MIA for week of July 23

Earl Clifford Hyatt

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Earl Clifford Hyatt. Born April 18th, 1895, in Benham, Indiana, Private Hyatt was a farmer when he was called into service on September 9th, 1917. He took his training at Camp Taylor, Kentucky with Company A, 355th Regiment, 84th Division. Sent to Camp Sevier, South Carolina, Hyatt went overseas on May 17th, 1918. In France he was reassigned to Company I, 120th Infantry, 30th Division, which was brigaded with the British forces. He was killed in action with them at St. Souplet during the final offensive in the Somme River valley on October 18th, 1918. Buried in a British temporary cemetery near St. Quentin, his remains later went unidentified. Nothing else is known at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Why not give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Key tags

“Nothing Stops These Men” – Custom Key Tag

Inspired by an original World War One poster, this key tag features the dramatic image of a bayonet advance on the enemy, with the United States flag in the upper corner.

A functional way to show your patriotism, this  1-1/4” long, custom key tag has a bright gold finish, with color-fill, and is offered exclusively through the World War One Centennial Commission. A portion of the proceeds goes towards funding the building of the National World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. 


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Charles Wesley Darrow

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Charles Wesley Darrow

 

Submitted by: Tracy Tomaselli {historian}

 

 

Charles Wesley Darrow born around 1898. Charles Darrow served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

Charles Wesley Darrow was born on 6 July 1898 in the Yalesville section of Wallingford, CT. He was the son of Nelson Edward Darrow and Florence Estella Calhoun. Charles was raised by his grandmother (Alice Rebina Spencer) and step-grandfather (Franklin Pierce Calhoun) who resided on Whitfield Street, Guilford, CT.

Charles Darrow joined Company D, 2nd Infantry Regiment, National Guard, on 19 June 1916 in New Haven, CT, at the age of 17, and served patrolling the Mexican border against raids. (service #64386)

The Connecticut 1st and 2nd Infantry Regiments, having been federalized on 28 March 1917 to serve in the First World War, were combined into one Regiment to form the 102nd Inf. Regt. (CTANG). Training with this regiment for Charles began at Camp Yale on 6 July 1917. The camp was located in the vicinity of the Yale Bowl.

Read Charles Wesley Darrow's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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July 17, 2018 

CFA meeting July 19 could bring go ahead for building National World War I Memorial in DC 

Center of sculpture stencil 48

The Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) in Washington, DC will meet on Thursday, 19 July 2018,  9 a.m. at 401 F Street, NW, Suite 312, with the design for the National World War Memorial being the second item on the meeting agenda.  The CFC will take written public comments regarding the design to be distributed to CFA members for their consideration. The CFC does not guarantee that comments received after 4:00 p.m. the day before a Commission meeting will be reviewed prior to presentations. Therefore, if you want to support the National World War Memorial in Washington, DC, submit your written comments here before 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18, 2018.


Senators Tester, Heller introduce measure to honor WWI "Hello Girls"

 

Hello Girls quartet

U.S. Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) are honoring the groundbreaking service of the women who connected American and French forces on the front lines during World War I. The Senators’ bipartisan Hello Girls Congressional Gold Medal Act will award the women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, dubbed the Hello Girls, with the Congressional Gold Medal for their service and subsequent 60 year fight to be recognized as veterans. Read more about this bipartisan proposed legislation here.


"Wild Bill" William Wellman made history in World War I and on the cinema screen

William Wellman

When the United States entered World War I, William Augustus Wellman, the great-great-great grandson of Francis Lewis, the New York Signatory of the Declaration of Independence, was eager to serve. He was quick to apply to the U.S. Air Service, but was denied, due to his lack of education. Undeterred, he quickly moved to join the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, part of the British Red Cross. The organization accepted many American volunteers to serve in France during the war, including a sixteen-year-old Walt Disney, who lied about his age to join. Wellman was then transferred to the French Foreign Legion and became the first American to join the Black Cat Squadron of the Lafayette Corps. In the second of our series on Hollywood and World War I, read how.Wellman's wartime aviation performance earned him the the nickname “Wild Bill,” a name that would follow him after the war, all the way to Hollywood., where that wartime aviation expertise would help shape the first motion picture to win the Academy Award.


Commission Announces Partnership with National History Day, Gilder-Lehrman Institute, and WWI Museum & Memorial

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The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission announced the formation of an educational partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, National History Day (NHD), and the National World War I Museum and Memorial. This new educational program will educate both teachers, and school students, on World War I, through a series of over 100 teaching events nationwide, which will include workshops, webinars, and other means of instruction. Additional components of the program will include:

  • Integrated meetings with incorporating assets from all partners
  • Webinars
  • “Master Teacher" trainings
  • Additional content development for online, newsletter and adult programming

Read more about this new and enduring partnership to teach new generations about America in World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering our World War I Veterans: Doughboy MIA with Rob Laplander

Robert Laplander

In July 6th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 79, author and Doughboy MIA managing Director Rob Laplander spoke with host Theo Mayer about his work, and the ongoing effort to locate, identify, and commemorate Americans who went missing in action during the Great War. The Doughboy MIA motto is “A man is only missing if he's forgotten.” Laplander and his team of volunteers, supported by the U.S. Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars, is not letting the World War I MIA be forgotten. Read the transcript of the interview with Robert Laplander here.

100 Cities, 100 Memorials: George Patton and the new US Tank Corps Monument

George Patton with Renault tank

In July 6th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 79, host Theo Mayer spoke with Karlen Morris, retired veteran from the Kentucky National Guard and commander of the Patton Battalion USABOT, and currently project manager for the new U.S. Tank Corps Monument, and Phil Wilburn, sergeant first class retired, also with USABOT, and a Patton Battalion board member and member of the monument committee, about George Patton and the US Tank Corps Monument in Fort Knox, Kentucky. Read a transcript of the interview here:    


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Our friends in France

Episode #80: Our Friends in France

100 Years Ago: Why America Celebrated Bastille Day | @02:05

War In The Sky: Quentin Roosevelt falls | @10:05

America Emerges: Marne and more - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:15

Great War Project: Writing WWI - Mike Shuster | @18:40

Commission News: $1.8M education partnership | @23:30

Remembering Vets: Finding you WWI Ancestors - Debra Dubek | @25:15

Stories of Service: Archiving those Stories of Service | @34:05

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Saugerties NY - Bill Payne, Vince Buono & Lisa Polay | @36:20

Speaking WWI: “Alleyman” | @43:50

WWI War Tech: Minenwerfer and Trench Mortars | @45:55

Dispatch: Newsletter highlights | @48:15

The Buzz: Selected Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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The Story of California's Muwekma Ohlone Indians in WWI

Check out this great post this week in the WWrite blog! 

In 1925, the Muwekma Ohlone Indians were erroneously declared extinct in California. 

Ethnohistorian Alan Leventhal has dedicated his life and career to correct this mistake. Don't miss WWrite's look at his work on writing and telling the story of Ohlone WWI veterans, who have proved that they have never stopped living...or fighting.


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Corporal Edward Graham

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Edward Graham.  Corporal Graham was born May 27th, 1889, at Burnettsville, Indiana and was a telegraph operator by trade. He enlisted in the regular army in July, 1917 and was sent to Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas in November of that year. Assigned to Company C, 5th Field Signal Battalion, he went to France in March of 1918. During the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, he served around the Montfaucon area of operations, patrolling and repairing communication wires; a particularly dangerous assignment which exposed him to regular shell fire. On October 6th, 1918, Corporal Graham was reported Missing in Action. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Polo shirt

Navy Blue Doughboy Polo Shirt

Perfect for summer! Inspired by the iconic image of an American Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA polo shirt. An informal term for a member of the U.S. Army or Marine Corps, “Doughboy” is especially used to refer to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War One. Largely comprised of young men who had dropped out of school to join the army, this poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. Shirt features: Navy with white Doughboy embroidery. 100% combed cotton pique, 6.2 oz. pre-shrunk fabric. Shirt has 3 wood-tone buttons, and side seam design for shape retention. Mens’ sizes available S – 2XL. Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial. A Certificate of Authenticity is included.


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Samuel L. Derby 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Samuel L. Derby

 

Submitted by: Stephen Nelson

Samuel L. Derby born around 9/7/1891, Samuel Derby served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

 

Story of Service

Samuel L. Derby was Killed in Action in the Battle of Argonne Forest, France 1918. The Battle of Argonne was deemed the largest battle in the United States history. The battle lasted 47 days and involved 1.2 million American soldiers and over 26 thousand died.

Born on September 7, 1891. He was one of seven children of Silas and Celia (Burch) Derby. Samuel L. Derby grew up on Institute Street, Frewsburg, New York. Called Sammy, he was active in the normal activity of the time, camping, fishing and canoeing on the Conewango Creek. during Winter months he and friends would ice skate on the Conewango flats or coast on the nearby snow-covered hills.

The coming year of 1917, America entered the World War and for the boys, the carefree days were at an end. All through that summer, fall and following winter the boys of Frewsburg were leaving for army camps. Sammy had graduated from Frewsburg Schools and worked at a local furniture factory until he joined the Army.

Read Samuel L. Derby's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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July 10, 2018

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From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

An interview with Bells of Peace Program Coordinator Betsy Anderson

Betsy Anderson

Bells of Peace, A World War I Remembrance is a collaborative program to bring the Centennial of the Armistice to communities and organizations across the nation, in a grassroots program to encourage the tolling of bells, and other commemorative activities, throughout  the United States on Sunday, November 11th, 2018 at 11 a.m. local time. Bells of Peace brings attention to the end of the fighting in World War I at the 11th Hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, a hundred years ago. In June 29th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 78, Program Coordinator Betsy Anderson spoke with host Theo Mayer about Bells of Peace, touching on the historical background and purpose of the initiative, as well as how people can participate. Read a transcript of this enlightening interview here.


Soldiers celebrate July 4 1918

How Doughboys in 1918 Celebrated Independence Day on July 4 in France

July 4th, 1918: Imagine yourself, an American, on the streets of Paris. Crowds bustle and cheer in excitement as you march past them. Even though you have yet to fight you feel triumphant, as if the battle has already been won. The American and French flags fly in unison high above you and in the air the scent of American food cooking smells delicious. A French child gives you a flower as you march by, a symbol of gratitude for fighting as an ally. Back home it is Independence Day, but in this foreign land you are joined in celebration. WW1CC intern Joseph Vesper takes a look back at how Doughboys all over France, in events large and small, observed American Independence on July 4, 1918.


ABMC Releases New Video about Suresnes American Cemetery near Paris

Suresnes American Cemetery

Suresnes American Cemetery, located just outside of Paris, is one of nine World War I cemeteries managed by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC). Created due to its proximity to American Expeditionary Forces’ hospital centers in and near the Paris area, Suresnes American Cemetery includes the remains of many Americans who died from injury or illness during the war. ABMC has released a new video presentation titled "Suresnes American Cemetery: America’s WWI Cemetery Near Paris" to tell more about the cemetery and its history. Click here to learn more, and view the new ABMC video.


Getting to Know A WWI Serviceman

Patrick Gregory

 

Author Patrick Gregory describes how he came to write the memoir An American on the Western Front with Elizabeth Nurser, and the bond he feels with the young man at its heart, a young man who carried his country’s first official flag to Europe in 1917 and served first in the ambulance corps and then as a fighter pilot, flying with both the French and US Air Services. Arthur Clifford Kimber was 21 when he set off for France in 1917 and just 22 when he died. Kimber agreed to write letters from the moment he left home, as often and as detailed as he could manage, and all 160 letters he sent survived the war--though Kimber did not. Through a family connection, Gregory has helped an absent Kimber give us a unique window on 1917 and 1918 in wartime Europe by combining his personal story with the bigger picture: the wider panorama of America’s war. Read more about how An American on the Western Front came to be written, and the profound messages it has for the 21st Century from a fallen American in WWI.

 


Battle of Hamel helped kindle "100 Years of Mateship" between Australia and US

Illinois and Australian soldiers at Hamel

One hundred years ago last week, members of the Illinois National Guard’s 33rd Division were fighting side by side with Australian troops in the Battle of Hamel. The fight in northern France was the 33rd’s first offensive in World War I, and the combination of eager Guardsmen and experienced Australians proved to be a winning combination.Last week the Illinois State Military Museum held an educational event on the Battle of Hamel and World War I, with military re-enactors and a talk on the battle complete with historic pictures, and an Australian deputy consul-general in attendance.  Read more about this commemorative event and the Illinois-Australia connection here.

Wright-Patterson event

In June, another event celebrated “‘100 years of Mateship”’ between Australia and the United States at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. Replica World War I aircraft and a display of World War I equipment and weaponry were the highlights of a commemoration and celebration, with an address by a Royal Australian Air Force representative. Read more about this event which honored all U.S. service personnel and welcomed special guests who had a connection with the Australian military


Immigrants played big WWI role for USA

Gordon Morse

Gordon C. Morse, writing in The Virginian-Pilot newspaper recently, makes the observation that "It may have happened 100 years ago, but the more time you spend with the first world war, the more it closes in on the present." Starting with a look at the issue of immigration in the early 20th century (which certainly has resonance in the early 21st), Morse comes to the clear understanding that "To grasp the war’s reality and its consequences is to learn that no sentient American should go about the day without understanding that WWI puts in motion the present role of the federal government, the responsibilities of global leadership, and the vast material cost of it all." Click here to read the entire thoughtful and informative article about the significance of WWI to the USA.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

WW1 era George S. Patton

Episode #79
July 1918 Overview  

100 Years ago: July 1918 overview - Theo Mayer, Katherine Akey & Dr. Edward Lengel | @02:10

Great War Project: Changing Landscape of the War - Mike Shuster | @18:15

Commission News: Armistice Centennial Participation App | @22:25

Remembering Veterans: Doughboy MIA - Rob Laplander | @ 23:35

Spotlight on the Media: Lost Voices - Michael Collins and Martin King | @31:05

Speaking WW1: Zero Hour | @36:20

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Patton and the US Tank Corps Project - Karlen Morris & Sgt. Phil Wilburn | @ 38:05

WW1 Tech: Trench Club | @43:30

Articles & Posts from the Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @45:35 

The Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @48:20


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Yoga and Animals: Inspiration for WWI Poetry

This week, Wrrite features the inspired poetry of Jane Satterfield, whose father is a Desert Storm veteran. 

Satterfield’s poetry and prose have appeared in American Poetry Review, Antioch Review, The Common, Crazyhorse, North American Review, Notre Dame Review, Pleiades, and many more, as well as on Verse Daily and Poetry Daily. The daughter of an American airman and a British mother, she grew up near Andrews Air Force Base in suburban Maryland.

Don't miss this unique post about yoga as a space for reflection and creation about war. Namaste.


Doughboy MIA for week of July 9

Lee Winslow

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Lee G. WinslowBorn August 21st, 1897, Private Winslow was a farmer in Fairmont, Indiana when he was drafted on March 28th, 1918. He was trained at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri and Washington Barracks, Washington, D.C. From there he went to Camp Merritt, New Jersey, where he received training with the Engineer Corps. Assigned to Company F, 1st Replacement Regiment, Engineers, and went to France in May, 1918. ‘Over There’ he was transferred to Company E, 2nd Engineers and was killed in action by shell fire on October 3rd, 1918 at Somme Py. His remains were never identified. 

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise:

A Silent Night

A Silent Night: A WWI Memorial in Song

The pieces of music you will hear on this disc are, in a sense, living artifacts of the WWI era, Despite the vast contrast in style among the various composers, almost every piece was composed within the ten-year period between 1912 and 1922.  The poetry and the music itself is infused with the emotions of the war, from vengeful violence to solemn mourning, to desperate calls for peace. The Washington Post wrote of this collection that "This recital was so different - so refreshingly, marvelously different...The goal of a recital is not originality as much as making a statement as an artist. And at this, Brancy and Dugan succeeded superbly."

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Herbert James

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Herbert James

 

Submitted by: Harry L. James {Great Nephew}

Herbert James born around 1895. Herbert James served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Herbert James was born on January 13th, 1895 in Bethlehem, Kentucky. In September of 1917 he was drafted into the Army at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky.

From September of 1917 to July of 1918 he passed through a series of training units starting at Camp Taylor then Camp Shelby in Mississippi as part of a Regular Army round out of a National Guard Division. At Camp Shelby Herbert along with 1000 other soldiers were then formed into Replacement Companies and transferred to Camp Merritt, New Jersey where they departed for France on the 11th of June, 1917 on the SS Corsican. 

The Corsican docked in Liverpool, England on the 24th of June. From there Herbert and his fellow soldiers were sent on a troop train to Southhampton and finally to combat training at the Depot Division, St. Aignan France. Once he completed his final training he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Regiment, 5th Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division on the 26th of July, 1918.

Read Herbert James's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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