Mule Rearing doughboys with mules African American Soldiers 1 pilots in dress uniforms gas masks Riveters The pilots African American Officers

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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September 18, 2018 

Centennial Ceremonies set September 23 in France for Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Largest Battle in U.S. Military History

Meuse-Argonne Cenetery

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the largest battle ever in the history of the U.S. military, involved well over a million people, almost a thousand aircraft, and 400 tanks.The battle took a horrific human cost – over 122,000 American casualties.100 years later, the sacrifices will be remembered and honored by ceremonies in France, hosted by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) and supported by the U.S. Defense Department (DoD). Six commissioners of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission will participate in the commemorative events. Click here to read more about what is planned to honor those who fought and fell.

Tanks in Meuse-Argonne

Writing in the Minnesota Star Tribune, Fritz Knaak  tells the detailed story of how U.S. soldiers achieved an almost impossible feat at horrific cost in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.  Viewing the battle through the lens of his grandfather's participation, he notes that "The long, long shadow cast by the Second World War and all that has happened since often obscure the sacrifices of the veterans of the First War, and the extraordinary accomplishment of the Army at the Battles of Meuse-Argonne." Click here to read the entire thoughtful essay, including his description of "what is still one of the great feats of American arms in history."


"Today’s geopolitical world has been shaped by no single factor more than the First World War."

 

Greatest War poster detail

Sean Michael Dargan is a professional singer, songwriter, guitar player, and highland bagpiper, who lives in Madison Wisconsin. He has a deep interest in military history, and even was the piper for a British army reenacting group that portrayed WWI BEF units. Sean contacted us with an incredible story -- He and a group of his professional musician/professional artist/professional historian friends got together, and decided to mark the centennial of WWI, and the war's impact and relevance, in their own way. As a result, they created a remarkable series of multimedia shows that will take place in Madison this fall.They include art exhibits, concerts, film screenings, all culminating in a show entitled THE GREATEST WAR which will take place on Nov 11th.  We asked Sean a few questions about this remarkable project of his; click here to read the entire interview.


“Diggers and Doughboys” Exhibition at National WWI Museum and Memorial

Diggers and Doughboys

Australian and American troops fought side-by-side for the first time in July 1918 during World War I. Since then, the Diggers (Australians) and Doughboys (Americans) supported each other in every major military conflict, including World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Diggers and Doughboys: The Art of Allies 100 Years On features incredible artwork from the Australian War Memorial Collection illustrating the unique comradeship between the two countries. Click here to read more about the Diggers and Doughboys exhibition, open in Memory Hall at the Museum through Sunday, Nov. 11.


Michael Wilson opens "One Man, One War, One Hundred Years" Art Exhibition

One Man

Michael Wilson is a visual artist, and a military veteran, who has created a remarkable new WWI-themed art exhibit that we previously wrote about, which will be showing at the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Cedar Rapids, Iowa from September 15 – December 30, 2018. This work is endorsed as an official project of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, and the Iowa WWI Centennial Committee. One Man, One War, One Hundred Years commemorates the 100th anniversary of the World War One armistice through the service of one soldier – the artist’s Great Uncle Herbert Thordsen. Click here to read all about this incredible artistic project, and the family history that informs it.


DH4 "Liberty Plane" gets closer to takeoff

Liberty Plane

The DH-4 "Liberty Plane" project to reconstruct the only remaining as delivered to the military DH4  in North America to flying status to commemorate those who flew her in World War 1, but also all military aviators who have served over the last 100 years, is getting closer to the sky. The lovingly restored DH4 made its debut at the EAA "Airventure" air show in Oshkosh, WI in July, and is being groomed forits  first flight in September. Click here to read an in-depth article about the DH4 "Liberty Plane" and the team who is bringing her back to the sky.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Updates From the States: New Jersey

 

New Jersey activities

In September 7th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 88, Host Theo Mayer spoke with  Sarah Cureton, executive director of the New Jersey Historical Commission, and Veronica Calder, archivist at the New Jersey State Archives, about the New Jersey World War One Centennial Committee, its origins, its projects and programs for the last few years, and it's plans beyond the armistice.  Click here to read a complete transcript of the interview.

Labor Day 1918

Babe Ruth

August 31st's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 87, was a look back at a truly exciting, and consequential, time in American history: the first week of September 1918. Host Theo Mayer took a look at some amazing domestic events from a hundred years ago, weaving together Labor Day, the unions, sedition, bombs, baseball, the Babe, and Butte, Montana, jumping into a centennial time machine to explore the war that changed the world. This Podcast was a home run -- click here to read a complete transcript of the entire episode.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

WW1 Centennial News Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Captured German soldiers during the Saint Mihiel Offensive

Episode 89
Highlights: Saint Mihiel Offensive

Episode Setup | @02:50

Saint Mihiel Overview - Mike Shuster | @03:50

Military Stories: Saint Mihiel - Dr. Edward Lengel | @07:25

War in the Sky: Saint Mihiel | @13:05

On the homefront: Headlines in the news | @15:35

Commission News: Bullet updates | @19:25

International events update - Dr. Monique Seefried | @24:35

Alabamians in WWI - Nimrod Frazier | @30:25

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Jacksonville, FL - Michele Luthin & Percy Rosenbloom | @36:10

WWI WarTech: The tank | @44:15

Articles & Posts: Dispatch highlights | @49:25

Centennial Social Media selections - Katherine Akey | @52:10


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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"Blessed are they that have the home longing"

The impeccable St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in Thiaucourt, France is a solemn yet majestic tribute to the 4,153 military dead who perished in the St. Mihiel offensive in September1918. 

However, just after the war, to impose a message of victory and order on a landscape that had borne so much disruption and carnage was a formidable undertaking. 

This week at WWrite, Mark Facknitz, member of the Historical Advisory Board of the WWICC, tells the complicated story of the cemetery's conception and the various narratives the St. Mihiel memorial offered those who came to grieve their war dead. 

Read""Blessed are they that have the home longing": St. Michael, Pershing, Spiritualism, and Capt. Walker Beale."as we commemorate the 100th anniversary of one of American's largest battles in military history.


Doughboy MIA for week of September 17

 Joseph Arto Monroe

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Joseph Arto Monroe. The son of Joseph and Ida (Dantzeisen) Monroe of Noble Township, Indiana, Joseph Jr. was born July 1st, 1891. A farmer, he entered the service on September 5th, 1917 at Shelbyville, Indiana and was sent first to Camp Taylor, Kentucky and then Camp Shelby, Mississippi for training. He sailed for France on June 10th, 1918, landing in country 12 days later, where he was assigned to Company F, 165th Infantry of the famous 42nd ‘Rainbow’ Division, made up of various National Guard units from all across the United States. He wasn’t with them long however, as on June 30th, 1918, he was killed in action as his unit tried to cross the Ourcq River. New to the unit, he was a virtual unknown to them thus and no one could ever say what happened to him.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

US Army Woolen Blanket

U.S. Army Woolen Blanket

Keep warm while showing your American pride with this classic green woolen U.S. Army blanket.

Still proudly Made in the USA by Woolrich, Inc., the oldest continuously operating woolen mill in the United States since 1830, the blankets were originally purchased by the U.S. military to supply our troops. Designed to be used by soldiers in the barracks, this Limited Edition blanket features a heat-marked “U.S.” emblem on the center and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorating the U.S. centennial of World War One. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the National WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C. Fabrics and Features: 66”W x 84” L; 24 oz. 65% wool/35% recycled wool. Overseamed at all four sides. Made in USA.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Albert J. Lentz

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Albert J. Lentz


Submitted by:
Mark A. Snell and Eric Lindblade

Albert J. Lentz born around 1895. Albert Lentz served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1915 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Private Albert J. Lentz of Company D, 18th Infantry, 1st Division, was the first soldier from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, to be killed-in-action during World War I. Lentz fell near Cantigny, France on April 26, 1918, a month before the seminal American offensive of the war. 

Albert had moved to Chicago about three years earlier but his parents, Israel and Susannah, still resided in Gettysburg at the time of Albert’s death. Ironically, Private Lentz spent part of his childhood living in the house that today is known as “General Lee’s Headquarters,” which in July 1863 was owned by the widow Mrs. Mary Thompson.

Read Albert J. Lentz's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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September 11, 2018

World War I Commemorative Garden Dedication Ceremony at Gen. John J. Pershing Boyhood Home Historic Site

Pershing Boyhood Home

Gen. John J. Pershing Boyhood Home State Historic Site will hold a ceremony to formally dedicate its new First World War Commemorative Garden 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, at the historic site in Laclede., MO. The public is invited to attend this historic dedication. Soil collected from the eight First World War American cemeteries, established by General Pershing as the chairman of the American Battlefield Monuments Commission (ABMC), will be incorporated into the grounds of the First World War Commemorative Garden landscape ceremonially by attending dignitaries. Click here to read more about this ceremony highlighting Pershing's personal determination to honor and memorialize those that paid the ultimate price and sacrificed so much in the “war to end all wars.”


National WWI Museum and Memorial Named one of Top 25 Museums in US

 

Museum sign

TripAdvisor, the world’s largest travel site, named the National WWI Museum and Memorial among the top 25 museums in the United States for the fourth time in the last five years as part of its 2018 Travelers’ Choice Awards. The National WWI Museum and Memorial, which houses the most comprehensive collection of World War I objects in the world, earned a No. 23 ranking from TripAdvisor among the more than 35,000 museums in the U.S. It was one of only three recognized on the top 25 list from the Midwest and the only museum from Missouri or Kansas to receive the distinction. Click here to read more about this prestigious award.


Trains & Traction project brings WWI-era restored train cars to towns in France

Train car

Last year, we told you about a remarkable WWI restoration project in France. Calling themselves Trains and Traction, a group of railway enthusiasts spent countless hours restoring original American Army World War I-era railway boxcars, for eventual display & exhibit. Their original project of one boxcar turned into an incredible restoration of fiive World War I-era boxcars, as well as a flat car, that were all part of the 37,800 train cars that American brought over to France during the war. Last summer, the five restored boxcars became a rolling display across a scenic railway short-line in south-west of France, where they were used as the centerpiece for a series of WWI commemorations, as well as a Fourth of July celebration. Click here to read more about this incredible effort of both restoration and exhibition of the WWI treasures.


Quilts raised money for World War I vets in United States during & after the war

Quilt detail

Quilt historian Sue Reich has collected World War I-era quilts from all over the country, and has written a book about them. Commissioner Jack Monahan met Sue at the American Legion’s 100th Convention in Minneapolis and toured an exhibition of the quilts she has collected.  We asked Sue a few questions about the quilts in her collection, and why they were created during WWI.


My High School Elective Class — Making a movie about America in World War I

Poster snip

In the fall of 2008, Frank Mazzi, a teacher at St. Helena High School in California, began a history elective class on World War I. The class title was The St. Helena High School World War I Research Institute. He taught the class until his retirement in June 2014, but the project had become something that transcended his teaching career. Mazzi continued to meet with students for two more years to complete what ended up as six-year film project on the American experience in the war. Clink here to read more about this remarkable WWI odyssey by teacher and students.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range

In September 7th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 88, Ron and Dr. Norma Eckert of the Friends of Fort Caswell Rifle Range joined the show to discuss their grassroots project to preserve the World War I rifle training range on Oak Island, a 13-mile barrier island along the Atlantic Ocean. Click here to read a transcript of their interview with Podcast host Theo Mayer.

  Caswell Rifle Range

September 1918 Roundtable

Marines maneuver during the Meuse Argonne

In September 7th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 88, our own Theo Mayer and Katherine Akey joined forces with podcast regular Dr. Edward Lengel for a round-table discussion about the month of September, 1918. Get up to speed on teh critical events of the decisive month of September 1918 as the American Expeditionary Force charged into the largest land battle ever fought by the US armed forces. Click here to read a complete transcript of the round-table discussion


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

WW1 Centennial News Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Troops waiting to advance at Hatton Chattel, St. Mihiel Drive -- Drawing by Capt. W. J. Aylward

Episode 88
Highlights: September 1918 Preview

September 1918 Overview - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer @| 01:55

American soldiers in Siberia - Mike Shuster @| 20:40

Commission News: Update on ACE and YourACE initiatives @| 25:05

Update from the States: New Jersey - Sara Cureton & Veronica Calder @| 27:00

Spotlight on the media: Football and WWI - Doug Bigelow @| 33:05

100C/100M: Fort Caswell Rifle Range - Ron & Dr. Norma Eckard @| 38:20

WW1 WarTech - Aircraft carrier @| 44:15

Speaking WW1 - “D-Day” @| 46:45

Dispatch Newsletter highlight @| 49:30

The Buzz - centennial social media picks - Katherine Akey @| 51:45


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Black Poppies: Writing About Britain's Black Servicemen

"The First World War is usually viewed as a predominantly white conflict," writes historian Stephen Bourne in his bookBlack Poppies: Britain's Black Community and the Great War.

Writer Andria Williams found this to be true as she began research for her next novel featuring a WWI black British soldier. 

This week at WWrite, Williams shares her exploration into this little-known aspect of WWI history that she aims to bring to light in her fictional work. A military spouse, Williams is the author ofThe Longest Night, a scintillating debut novel about a young couple whose marriage is tested when they move to an army base rife with love triangles, life-or-death conflicts, and a dramatic cover-up. Read this unique post about navigating between historical facts and the creative craft of writing fiction.


Doughboy MIA for week of September 10

Howard Urquhart Snyder

A man is only missing if he is forgotten. 

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Howard Urquhart Snyder.  The son of Wilson E. and Ida K. Snyder of South Bend, Indiana, Howard was born September 5th, 1995, and was a student at Cornell University when the war broke out in April, 1917. He entered the first officer’s training camp at Madison Barracks, New York, but failed his course. Therefore he enlisted in the regular US Army on September 26th, 1917. Sent to Washington Barracks, Washington D.C., he was assigned to the 6th US Engineer Regiment, where because of his officer’s training experience he was made a corporal. Snyder then went overseas in December, 1917 and was killed in action on July 15th, 1918 at Chateau Thierry. His remains were known to have been interred in the US cemetery at Chateau Thierry but later went unidentified and he is believed to have been interred in a grave marked ‘Unknown’.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Stamp in Frame

WWI Collectible Stamp and Frame

A new stamp, named by the U.S. Postal Service as "The WWI: Turning the Tide Forever Stamp" is offered in a beautiful frame. The Postal Service pays tribute with this stamp to the sacrifice of the countless Americans—including those in uniform and millions of supporters on the home front — who experienced the seminal conflict of the 20th century. Frame contains: WWI collectible stamp, replica Victory Lapel Pin, and Centennial Commission card.

A Certificate of Authenticity included with the frame .

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


John Chester Foster

 

 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

John Chester Foster


Submitted by:
Mark Foster {grandson}
 

John Chester Foster born around 1885. John Foster served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

In December of 2010, I started going through a box of my father's, letters, newspaper articles and pictures. I started reading several regarding my grandfather who was killed in World War 1.

I knew very little about this man except that he was buried at Arlington National cemetery. Our family rarely spoke of him; he had divorced my grandmother and abandoned his family. My father never mentioned him and speaking with cousins, my uncles never brought him up either.

One interesting newspaper article stated that his headstone at Arlington was incorrectly labeled. It was from the Illinois State Register dated March 8, 1936 and said “the tombstone on his grave had borne the inscription, John Chester Foster of Pittsburg, Kansas, killed in action, 27 April 1918”. It went on to say that the family had visited Arlington and had trouble finding the grave because it had Kansas instead of Illinois. Later it said that the family had requested the headstone be changed and the war department had authorized “that a properly inscribed tombstone would be installed without delay.”

Read John Chester Foster's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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September 4, 2018 

TESTED interview Sabin

Sculptor Sabin Howard shares new National World War I Memorial design on YouTube’s “TESTED” series

Sabin Howard, sculptor for the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC is featured in a brand new episode of YouTube’s hit series TESTED series, hosted by Adam Savage, former co-host and co-creator of the huge cable TV series MYTHBUSTERS. In the new TESTED segment, Sabin shares with Adam the stories of what he did to create the scale model maquette for the new National WWI Memorial in Washington DC, using 3-D printing and other digital technology. Click here to read the entire article, and watch the video episode featuring Howard and the WWI Memorial design.


President Trump to mark centennial
of World War I Armistice in Paris

 

Trump-Macron

USA Today reports that President Donald Trump will travel to Paris to participate in a November 11 commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended World War I, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders announced Friday. "The President’s participation in this event will highlight the sacrifices that Americans have made, not only during World War I but also in the century since, in the name of liberty," Sanders said in a statement. Click here to read the entire USA TODAY article.


American Legion Votes to Support Commission WWI Centennial Programs

Legionnaires

The American Legion, the nation’s largest veteran services organization, wrapped up its 100th National Convention at the Minneapolis Convention Center in Minneapolis having voted to support three major programs created the by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, including the "Bells of Peace"program for November 11, 2018, the centennial of the Armistice that ended the fighting in Europe in WWI. Click here to read the entire article about the Legion's support for the World War I Centennial Commission.


Rhode Island National Guard wreath ceremony honors their WWI soldiers

RHode Island NG wreath

Members of the Rhode Island National Guard memorialized their predecessors' service and sacrifice by laying a wreath last week at a World War I monument. Rhode Island's 1st Battalion, 103rd Field Artillery was drafted for overseas service in the American Expeditionary Forces and went to France in October 1917. The unit participated in several battles after moving to the front lines in February 1918 and was recognized for valorous conduct for repelling enemy attacks near Seicheprey, France, according to the National Guard. Click here to read more about this WWI centennial ceremony in Rhode Island.


World War I motorcycle memorial ride across America reaches Las Vegas

WWI Harley in Nevada

After crossing the Atlantic Ocean and journeying thousands of miles across the country, a motorcycle dating from World War I rode through Las Vegas last week.  As previously reported on the WW1CC web site, the Model J and its sidecar rolled onto American soil for the first time in a century in June, kick-starting the nationwide "Operation Twin Links" tour  from the Gulf Coast to the Pacific Coast, at a top speed of 45 MPH, to honor American World War I vets. Click here to read the entire article and watch the video of the Las Vegas ceremony welcoming the motorcycle team.


Remembering the World War I service
of Admiral John "Slew" McCain

McCain

Last week, our nation mourned the loss, and celebrated the life, of Senator John McCain. As we know, Senator McCain's commitment to our country also included wartime service in Vietnam as an aviator with the U.S. Navy. His Navy service has connection to that of his grandfather, John "Slew" McCain (pictured at left as a Midshipman at the United States Naval Academy in the early 1900's), who fought in World War I and would become a highly-regarded Admiral during World War II. Click here to read the entire article, and find out how McCain had a near-miss with the sinking of the USS San Diego in World War I.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

WW1 Centennial News Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube

New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

The IWW - The Industrial Workers of the World - bomber

Labor Day 1918: Episode #87
Highlights:

Labor Day, Unions, Sedition, Bombs, the Babe and Butte  | @ 02:00

Surging forward on the Western Front - Mike Shuster  | @ 11:45

Bio Special: Great War Channel - Indy Neidell  | @ 15:55

Commission News: YourACE program launches  | @ 16:55

Michigan Commemorates WWI - Dennis Skupinski  | @ 22:50

Remembering WWI @ the Durham Museum - Jessica Brummer & Emma Sundberg  | @ 29:20

International Report: Gathering in Verdun  | @ 35:35

Education: Newsletter Issue #14 “Medicine & Shell Shock” comes out  | @ 37:00

WW1 WarTech: Thomas Splint  | @ 37:50

Speaking WW1: “Body Snatchers”  | @ 39:50

Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter  | @ 41:35 

The Buzz: Selected Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey  | @ 44:00


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

The Enemy You Killed By Ruth Edgett

What happens when a past enemy has become a modern ally?  

Last week on WWrite,David Eislercontributed a post about WWI memorials in Germany. This week, Ruth Edgett gives another perspective on German mourning as she takes us to a German cemetery in France near Vimy Ridge where her Canadian grandfather fought with the Allies in 1917. 

In this post, Edgett provides a non-fiction behind-the-scenes look at her short story inspired by her grandfather's experience,"Hill 145,"which won the 2017 Consequence Magazine"Women Writing War" Prize in Fiction and was featured at WWrite this June. 

Read "The Enemy You Killed," a moving post about Germany's place among the Allied war dead.


Doughboy MIA for week of September 3

Arnold Matthew McInery

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is 1st LT Arnold Matthew McInery. Born April 23rd, 1893, Lieutenant McInery was a student at Notre Dame University when war broke out. He enlisted in the first officer’s training program at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on May 15th, 1917. Upon completion of his training he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant and went overseas with the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Division. While leading his company into an attack during the Battle of Soissons on July 18th, 1918, Lt. McInery was killed in action and interred in a makeshift battlefield grave, which was never located after. The company he led into battle that day was later decorated by the French for bravery in action during that attack. 

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Necktie

World War One
Custom Silk Tie

 

This 100% woven silk tie has been custom created for the World War One Centennial Commission.  This red silk tie features World War One era aircraft and the official logo of the Centennial Commission on the back.  This beautiful tie also comes packaged in a 2 piece box with the Doughboy seal printed on the top.  Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


James Milo Miller 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

James Milo Miller

 

Submitted by: Myron M. Miller {Son}

 

 

James Milo Miller born around 1893. James Miller served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919. 

Story of Service

The Service in World War I of James Milo Miller, 314th Field Artillery Regiment February 1918 – March 1919 

First, I would like to say that I have written a book about the experience of my father, James Milo Miller, in World War I based on all the letters he wrote to various members of his extended family during his time in that war, from the time of his being drafted in 1918 until he was discharged in March 1919. The book also describes the remarkable hospitality extended to the three regiments of the 155th Field Artillery Brigade (the 313rd, the 314th and 315th Field Artillery Regiments) during their two months of training on the French 75 in and near the city of Redon, Brittany, France.

The men of the 155th Field Artillery Brigade made such a favorable impact on the citizens of that city that there was a 100th year commemoration of the arrival of that brigade in Redon on June 9, 2018! The brigade entered Redon for their two months of training in the wee hours of June 13, 1918.

Read James Milo Miller's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 28, 2018

More states join Bells of Peace Initiative 

Bells of Peace logo vertical

The Governors of Missouri, Illinois and Mississippi have joined the effort to promote Bells of Peace: A World War I Remembrance by issuing proclamations asking all their citizens to toll bells on November 11, 2018, in recognition of the centennial of the signing of the Armistice that ended the fighting in World War I. Bells of Peace is an initiative sponsored by the World War I Centennial Commission to commemorate the service and sacrifice of those who served in World War I, and all veterans. The Commission has called on all Americans everywhere to toll bells 21 times, at 5-second intervals, on November 11 at 11:00 a.m. local time. Read more about how you and your church, school, community organization, veterans group, firehouse, or anyone else with a bell to ring can participate in this growing national commemoration event on November 11, 2018.


Ceremony casts new light on nearly forgotten SF monument to WWI fallen

 

SF Memorial

There was a solemn ceremony at noon on Saturday, August 25 at Heroes Grove, the site of a nearly forgotten monument in Golden Gate Park, to honor 761 San Franciscans who died in the war to end all wars a century ago. The monument is an 18-ton granite stone carved with the names of 748 men and 13 women from San Francisco who died in World War I. The site, called the Grove of Heroes, is surrounded by redwood trees and reached by an unmarked trail near the park entrance at 10th Avenue and Fulton Street. “It is a very beautiful place, a quiet spot where you could come and reflect,” said retired Marine Corps Maj. Gen. J. Michael Myatt, chair of San Francisco’s World War I Centennial commemoration. Click here to read more about this historic monument and the recent ceremony.


Quincy, IL African-American physician who served in WWI was mover, shaker

African-American doctors

The Herald-Whig newspaper in Quincy, IL continued its fine World War I coverage recently with an in-depth profile of  Dr. Hosea J. Nichols, one of the 104 doctors of African-American descent who were physicians in World War I. His father, William Nichols, who had been born a slave, served with the Union Army in the 59th U.S. Colored Infantry during the Civil War. At the age of 47, Dr. Hosea Nichols volunteered for military service. He trained at Fort Des Moines, Iowa, which had been a cavalry training post but was converted to train African-American officers when the United States entered World War I. Click here to read more about Dr. Hosea Nichols' record of both military any civic service.


"Hello Girls" movie and medal effort both gaining public and political attention

Hello Girls

The "Hello Girls" movie previously profiled here in DISPATCH is moving into wider distribution across the nation. The film is embarking on whirlwind schedule of Film Festivals and screenings. According to the film's producer and director James Theres, Hello Girls has been accepted into the lineup of several major Film Festivals, to include the GI Film Festival in San Diego, as well as the Heartland International Film Festival in Indianapolis. Click here to read more about where the movie will be when over the coming months.

Hello Girls snip

Meanwhile, the bipartisan effort in the U.S. Congress to authorize a Gold Medal for the Hello Girls, previously described in DISPATCH here, is continuing to gain ground with new co-sponsors coming aboard. Recently the Task & Purpose military veterans web site published an in-depth article about the history of Hello Girls, their shabby treatment by the Army after the war ended, and why the Congressional medal is well-deserved recognition of the service of the Hello Girls. Click here to read the entire thoughtful article on the Task & Purpose site.


First US Naval Rail gun operational for final Allied counter-offensive of WWI

Rail gun

On August 18th, 1918, the U.S. Navy's first naval railway gun, a 14-inch, 50 caliber, Mark IV Navy gun mounted on a railway carriage, became operational in St. Nazaire, France during World War I. The guns were used to target key infrastructure deep behind the German lines, and scored some notable successes, including destroying a section of a moving supply train, ripping up an entire three-track line for a distance of some 100 yards, and scoring a direct hit on a German troop train with devastating results. Click here to read more about the big guns' contribution to the war effort, and where you can see one of the rail guns today.


The Liberation 1918-2018: "The reaction of the audience was overwhelming."

Belgium tour

An amazing WWI Living History event has been taking place this past week across Belgium. Called "The Liberation 1918-2018", the project consists of a column of dozens of WWI reenactors in period vehicles, wagons, costumes, uniforms, and equipment, who are trekking across Belgium, following the route of the final counter-offensive of the war. In Flanders Fields of September 1918 a massive campaign was launched by Belgian, British, Commonwealth, French and American forces against the German axis forces in a final effort to end the War of wars and liberate Belgium. To commemorate this final offensive, a historical multinational column embarked on an epic journey from Lo-Reninge to Deinze between 13 and 19 August 2018 -- stopping in several towns, at every memorial and battlefield to pay due homage to all of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our liberty. Click here to read an extensive interview with the leader of this unique living history event, Mr. David Moortgat, President, V.Z.W Platform for Belgian military history.


Innovative Cosmetic Surgery Restored WWI Vets' Ravaged Faces—And Lives

Plastic surgery snip

During and after World War I, the blue benches outside London’s Queen’s Hospital were reserved for soldiers who had suffered facial wounds on the Western Front that had never been seen before in warfare. Improvements in anesthesia and treating infections meant that these gruesome battlefield injuries had become survivable, but the facial wounds could be so severe that they left soldiers unable to eat, drink, or even speak. As terrible as other amputations were, the soldiers who lost their faces also lost their identities. But inside Queen’s Hospital, pioneering new techniques in plastic surgery and facial reconstruction, born of necessity, helped  provide some semblance of normal life to those with these terrible injuries.  Click here to read the entire History.com article on the surgeons' work, and how they helped create "hope instead of despair” for their patients.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Seth and Garrett Moore Interview

Moore Twins

In August 24th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 86, Host Theo Mayer spoke with Seth and Garrett Moore, nineteen year old twin brothers with an incredible passion for WW1, originally sparked by family history, when their great-grandmother told them about her uncle who went off to fight the Germans in 1917. Click here to read a transcript of the interview.

Observation Balloons 

Balloon

In August 24th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 86, WW1 Tech and Speaking WW1 shared a common theme: Observation Balloons, a crucial but frequently overlooked piece of World War I aviation technology.  Click here to read a transcript of the interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Balloonatic jumping to safety

Highlights: #86
Airplanes to end the war? Some say.

Airplanes to end the war? Some say! | @ 02:05

Continued war just out of habit? - Mike Shuster | @ 13:10

Part 3: The 28th Division in Fismette - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 17:00

The American Legion and ACE - US WWI Commissioner Jack Monahan | @ 24:40

Video Game “11-11 Memories Retold” - Yoan Fanise | @ 30:00

19-year-old twin WWI reenactors - Seth & Garrett Moore | @ 37:45

WW1 War Tech: Observation Balloons | @ 43:45

Speaking WWI: Balloonatic | @ 47:00

Articles & Posts: From the Dispatch Newsletter | @ 48:05 

The Buzz: Social Media Highlights - Katherine Akey | @ 50:45


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Heroes' Grove: Remembering and Forgetting the Great War in Germany

After war, how does a country commemorate its soldiers in the shadow of defeat and shame?  David Eisler explores the question this week at WWrite by analyzing the evolution of a war cemetery in Germany’s Rhein-Neckar Valley. Eisler, a U.S. Army veteran whose writing has appeared in The New York Times,War on the RocksThe Daily Beast, Collier’s Magazine, Military Review,Drunken Boat, and the anthology of short fiction, The Road Ahead: Fiction from the Forever War, is a PhD candidate at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies in Heidelberg, Germany. His doctoral dissertation focuses on the relationship between American civil-military relations and contemporary war fiction from Vietnam to Iraq and Afghanistan. Read this eloquent, perceptive post about remembering and forgetting Germany's WWI dead.


Doughboy MIA for week of August 27

Private George J. McDonald

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private George J. McDonald.  George McDonald was born June 8th, 1991 in Shoals, Indiana. He was a laborer when he was called into service on October 6th, 1917 and sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training. He went ‘Over There’ on April 7th, 1918, and was assigned to Company G, 28th Infantry, 1st Division. He was lost during the Battle of Soissons; initially being listed as Missing in Action and that status later being changed to Killed in Action, though his remains were never located. His case remains a mystery. 

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandises

Pritzker Book

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

 

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force.  Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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John William Tarter 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

John William Tarter

 

Submitted by: T.J. Cullinane, community historian

John William Tarter born around 1895, John Tarter served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

John William Tarter was a soldier of the Great War who was felled by disease rather than German bombs and bullets.

He was born in Hartline, Washington on April 3, 1895 to Joseph Henry Tarter (1862 – 1925) and the former Nancy Ann Epperley (1864 – 1945). Hartline is a small town in Grant County located in central Washington. Tarter had four siblings: Joseph Clinton Tarter, Bonnie B. Tarter Neal (1886 – 1983), Maude D. Tarter Zetty (1890 – 1979), and Lonnie Clinton (1893 – 1966).

From John’s draft registration card, we learn that was tall with a medium build and had blue eyes and dark brown hair. When the United States entered the war in 1917, John was employed as a miner with the Federal Mining and Smelting Company in neighboring Shoshone County, Idaho.

Read John William Tarter's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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August 21, 2018

"We can live in freedom but the price was very high. It is our duty to commemorate their sacrifice. " 

Stassen-Burnworth

Peter Stassen and his family are remarkable people, who are carrying out a very honorable pursuit. This Flemish family has volunteered to be part of an 'Adopt A Grave' program at the Flanders Field American Cemetery, administered by the American Legion. Flanders Field is a true 'battlefield cemetery', and the area surrounding the site saw intense fighting during the autumn of 1918. Now, however, Flanders Field Cemetery is a place of peace, and contemplation, managed by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC). Most of the 368 military graves there are from this battle. Mr. Stassen is, himself, a retired military member, so he knows a little about service and sacrifice. We spoke to him about his experiences, and his family's efforts to commemorate our American WWI hero.


Symbolic & Powerful Poppy Art at National WWI Museum and Memorial

 

Poppies at NWWIM&M

During the course of World War I, approximately 117,000 American soldiers lost their lives in defense of the United States and its allies. As the centennial of the Armistice of World War I approaches, the National WWI Museum and Memorial and artist Ada Koch honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice with a moving and powerful art installation. Reflections of Hope: Armistice 1918 features 117 intricate metal poppy sculptures designed by Koch in a symbolic arrangement in the Reflection Pool at the Museum and Memorial. Each poppy represents 1,000 American soldiers killed during the Great War. Click here to read more about how this installation uses the powerful symbolism of the poppy to commemorate American service men and women who lost their lives in World War I.


#AMIENS100 Student Battlefield Tour Diary is now available online

Le Hamel

In August 2018, students from Australia, Canada, France, the UK and the United States came together to tour the former WWI battlefields, as part of the commemoration of the centennial of the war in Amiens, France. Two groups of students came from the U.S., sponsored with help from the US World War I Centennial Commission and the National WWI Museum and Memorial, as part of their joint Education programs. Read more here about the students' expedition, and what they felt about the value of understanding World War I for students today.


From the Battlefields of World War I: Lessons on Franco-American Relations and the Centuries-Old Military Alliance

Oise-Aisne American Cemetery

The Meridian International Center explored the question of what lessons can be gleaned from the Franco-American relationship that stems back over 250 years during a summer delegation to France that brought U.S. National Guard officials and American diplomats together with French military and political leaders in commemoration of the Second Battle of the Marne, the last major German offensive on the Western Front during the First World War. Meridian partnered with the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission to host 40 leaders including high-ranking U.S. National Guard and French generals, World War I military historians, French senators and mayors, and WWI Centennial Commissioners. Read more here about this gathering and discussion.


"We share a bond with our forefathers – the Soldiers who came before us."

Bayonet training

In a powerful and pointed article on the U.S. Army Reserve web site entitled "Why World War I Matters," Major Frank Huffman of the U.S. Army Reserve Command talks directly to his fellow soldiers about the "13,484 reasons World War I matters to today’s Army Reserve Soldier. That is the number of Americans killed in action “Over There,” along with another 52,721 who were wounded in the fight."  Click here to read the entire thoughtful article about the profound debt owed by today's soldiers to their World War I forbears.


Cousins Reunited: How the World War I U.S. Occupation of Germany Still Reverberates a Century Later

Cousins reunited

The clues were in a faded, tattered black-and-white photograph that Johannes Heibel’s father carried with him everywhere. Nearly 100 years after it was taken in a German village, the photo shed light on a family secret that connected Heibel to a cousin he had never known in faraway Tennessee. In this centennial year marking the end of World War I, the discovery illuminates a postwar occupation of Germany that most Americans have never heard of: A quarter-million U.S. troops held some 2,500 square miles of Rhineland for four years after the November 1918 armistice that ended the fighting. Click here to read the entire article about how distant cousins an ocean apart were led to find each other.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Devil's Rope

Episode #85
Highlights: 1.5 Million "Over There"

100 years ago: Ready to increase US forces to 4 million | @ 02:10

German perspective on the turn around - Mike Shuster | @ 12:25

Part 2: 28th division - the Pennsylvania Doughboys - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 16:30

Announcing resources for local Armistice Centennial Events - YourACE | @ 23:15

Spotlight on the media: The Hello Girls - Jim Theres | @ 29:50

Update from the States: Wyoming and Indian Doughboys - Douglas R. Cubbison | @ 37:00

WWI WarTech - Devil’s Rope | @ 44:45

Dispatch Newsletter Highlights | @ 47:50 

BUZZ - Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 49:55


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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The Debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans, Part 2: Jean Moulin

This post is the second in a WWrite series on the debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans. 

Last week, the blog featured resister Albert Camus and the influence of his father, a WWI soldier who died at the Battle of the Marne. 

This week, WWrite explores the most famous French Resistance icon, Jean Moulin. One of France's most celebrated WWII heroes began his fight in WWI as a soldier and an artist. 

The experience, which he discusses in his book, First Combat, shaped his rise as the leader of France's Resistance Army, also known as the "Army of Shadows." Read the inspiring story of Moulin's voyage across two world wars at WWrite this week!


Doughboy MIA for week of August 20

Private John T. Miller

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private John T. Miller. Born on October 4th, 1897, John Miller enlisted in the regular US Army on June 16th, 1916 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He was assigned to the medical department and transferred to Ft. Bliss, Texas. From there he served on the border with Company C, 2st Provisional Field Hospital at El Paso, Texas. He went overseas with the first American combat contingent to go over in June, 1917, where he was assigned to the medical detachment of the 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, 1st Division. He was killed in action at Chateau Thierry on July 19th, 1918. Buried on the battlefield, his grave was never located.

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Charm Pendant

Charm Pendant

Proudly wearing the WWI 100 Years charm pendant is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago. This satin nickel charm, worn on a necklace or bracelet, is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
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Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols


Submitted by:
Alan Leventhal, Tribal Ethnohistorian, Muwekma Ohlone Tribe
 

Henry Abraham Lincoln Nichols was born around 1895. Henry Nichols served in World War 1 with the United States Navy. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

Henry Nichols was born in Niles on February 12, 1895 to Charles Nichols and Muwekma Ohlone Susanna Flores Nichols.

Henry enlisted on May 23, 1917 and first served on the USS Albatross. By December 31, 1917 he was transferred to the Battleship USS Arizona, and later on March 26, 1918 he was transferred again to the Battleship USS Oklahoma.

During World War I Henry Nichols served in the North Atlantic and was on escort duty in December 1918 when the Oklahoma was serving as escort during President Woodrow Wilson's arrival in France at the end of the war (November 11, 1918). The Oklahoma returned to Brest, France on June 15, 1919 to escort home President Wilson who was transported on the USS George Washington from his second visit to France.

Read Henry Nichols' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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