Riveters gas masks The pilots African American Soldiers 1 Mule Rearing doughboys with mules pilots in dress uniforms African American Officers

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The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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March 19, 2019

Weishaar in NW Arkansas Democrat Gazette

"To not honor those men and women for their service and sacrifice would be a discredit to their memories."

Architect Joe Weishaar, designer of the national World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C., will be going home April 3 to speak on "To End All Wars: The Fight for the National World War I Memorial" as part of the Honors College Invites lecture series at the University of Arkansas, his alma materWeishaar was interviewed by the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette newspaper in anticipation of his appearance at the University next month. Click here to read the entire insightful interview about how Weishaar's world has changed since winning the design competition for the Memorial.


Women played vital roles in World War I

WWI Museum Women i WWI snip

At the time of the First World War, most women were barred from voting or serving in military combat roles. Many saw the war as an opportunity to not only serve their countries but to gain more rights and independence. With millions of men away from home, women filled manufacturing and agricultural positions on the home front. Others provided support on the front lines as nurses, doctors, ambulance drivers, translators and, in rare cases, on the battlefield. Click here to read more about how American women mobilized for the war effort a century ago.


The American Legion Centennial: It all began in Paris a century ago

American Legion logo

The American Legion organization’s 55 departments and nearly 12,500 posts across the country and around the world are celebrating a century of service to community, state and nation that began in Paris March 15-17, 1919, when war-weary members of the American Expeditionary Forces gathered for a “morale conference” that led to the creation of what would become The American Legion. Only 300 troops were expected to attend. Officially, 463 registered. Some have estimated that more than 1,000 came and went, with or without orders, during the weekend that launched a century of accomplishments unforeseeable, if not unimaginable, at the time. Click here to read more about how a chaotic and informal wartime meeting was the genesis of the nation's largest veterans organization a century ago this month.


“Yeomanettes” paved the way for women of all Navy ratings today

Yeomanette

In order to fill severe clerical shortages caused by World War I, the U.S. Navy approved the enlistment of women in 1917. The Naval Reserve Act of 1916 made no specific gender requirements for yeomen, enlisted personnel who fulfill administrative and clerical duties. So either by deliberate omission or accident, the act opened the opportunity to enlist women. One of the first through the door on March 17, 1917 was Loretta Perfectus Walsh, who became the first active-duty female in the Navy who wasn’t a nurse. The newly-enlisted Sailors were given the rating Yeoman (F), with the “F” designating female. More popularly referred to as “yeomanettes,” the majority worked in clerical positions, but they also served as translators, draftsmen, fingerprint experts, ship camouflage designers and recruiting agents. Click here to read more about how these women pioneers in military service set the standard for all who followed.


"We encourage folks to share this information with educators."

Who They Were toolkit cover

The Centennial Commission's efforts in the area of Education are among our most important endeavors. Ultimately, the mission of the Centennial Commission is to educate people, especially our coming generations, as the stories and lessons of World War I are their inheritance. We are thrilled to help our Education Department to roll out a new tool for educators -- a brief video entitled "Who We Were", which helps to describe the various resources available to teachers and students of World War I. We spoke with our friend Ryan Hegg about the new video. Ryan has long been with the Centennial Commission as a volunteer and as a staffer, and he was part of the production of this new video.


A General's family WWI story: From segregation to command in 100 years

BGen Beagle

Pvt. Walter Beagles arrived at Camp Jackson, South Carolina, in 1918, an African American draftee in a segregated Army that relegated black soldiers to labor battalions out of a prejudiced notion that they couldn’t fight. More than 100 years later, his great-grandson now serves as the base’s 51st commanding general. Brig. Gen. Milford Beagle, Jr., a combat veteran who took command last June, admits that it gets to him, knowing he’s serving where his ancestor served but under vastly different circumstances. “It does become pretty surreal to know that the gates my great-grandfather came through are the same gates I come through,” Beagle said. Click here to read this entire fascinating article about a family's World War I saga.


World War I letters give Chesterfield students hands-on history lesson

Chesterfield student

Some sixth graders at Providence Middle School in Chesterfield County are getting a hands-on history lesson thanks to dozens of century-old letters from World War I.  Every other day Ms. Jennifer Covais’ students arrive to crunch numbers as they immerse themselves in the past using authentic dispatches written from war-torn France during WW I. The author, Johnny Cawthra, was a disabled clerk with American Express who could not serve in the military because he was blind in one eye. “They love writing. It's an elective. It is an honors writing class,” Covais said. "I like to make memories with my kids."  Click here to read more about (and watch the video of) how students are transcribing Cawthra’s observations that range from his visits with wounded soldiers in a hospital and watching President Wilson to witnessing the ravages of war.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Spotlight on the Media:
'The Hello Girls' Documentary
Executive Producer Jim Theres

James Theres

In March 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 113, host Theo Mayer spoke with Jim Theres, executive producer of 'The Hello Girls,' about the remarkable history of these women and his acclaimed film highlighting their service. Just this month, Theres received a special recognition award at the Army Women's Foundation Hall of Fame induction ceremony, for spotlighting America's first female soldiers. Click here to read a transcript of this entire interview, and find out where you can see the Hello Girls movie yourself.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. 

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Bankrupt investor Walter Thornton  roadster for $100 cash

Episode #114
The Great War / Great Depression Connection

Host - Theo Mayer
100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:00

Imperialism at the Peace Conference - Mike Shuster | @ 10:55

The Great War and the Great Depression Connection - Prof. Maury Klein | @ 15:15

A Pioneering American Woman Doctor in WWI - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 22:30

No Seat at the Table: Ireland - Host | @ 26:55

“Official Bulletin” Back Online - Host | @ 30:05

Cantata: And Crimson Roses Once Again Be Fair - Alejandro Valdez & Joseph Turrin | @ 32:55

Winner: 2019 Canine Hero of the Year - Host | @ 41:15

Speaking WWI: Dog Fight | @ 42:35


Literature in WWI This Week

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Army of Shadows

By Roxana Robinson

When award-winning author Roxana Robinson was writing her critically acclaimed book about a veteran of the Iraq war, "Sparta", she only allowed herself to read one war novel: Erich Maria Remarque's "All Quiet on the Western Front".
For Robinson, it "beautifully resolves the problems of scale and language" with a narrative that is "both beautiful and desolate."
Read Robinson's reflections on contemporary war writing through the lens of Remarque's WWI classic novel at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Where do we go from here, girls?

BEHIND THEIR LINES examines American women's responses to the changes in society that followed World War I.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Morning Java Candle Mug

Morning Java Candle Mug

These replica tin mugs have been upcycled from regular coffee mugs into coffee candles.

The "Morning Java" scent will fill the room with a wonderful coffee aroma that includes just a hint of chocolate.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item is designated for completing the National WWI Memorial in Washington D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation Red Cross ambulance


John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

Submitted by: Patti Jacobsen {great-niece}

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles born around 1889. John "Jack" Nilles served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

My great-uncle, John Thomas “Jack” Nilles was born 24 March 1889 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, the eighth and youngest child of Peter Hubert Nilles and Anna Margaret (Beth) Nilles. He attended St. Luke’s Catholic School through the eighth grade.

By 1909, Jack decided to learn the lumbering and building material business and he started at the bottom in order to gain practical knowledge in his field. He worked at Schmitt Lumber in Two Rivers and later at Farrell Lumber in Algoma, Wisconsin.

He was socially active, a member of the Columbus Club and served as club secretary for a number of years. As a musician, he played cornet with the local band and attended local dances.

Jack registered for the draft in the first registration on 5 June 1917: for all men between ages 21 and 30. His registration states that no one was dependent on him for support.

Read John "Jack" Thomas Nilles' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 12, 2019

Sculptor Sabin Howard on a mission to effect lasting social progress through art

Sculpture women snip

A brand-new “Great Women Sculpture Initiative” (GWSI), which aims to change the way women are portrayed in sculpture, is celebrating female leadership in human rights, civil rights, and women’s rights. The sculptor for the national World War I Memorial in Washington, DC, Sabin Howard, is a key player in the movement. Howard and his associates have started the process to create a body of work of female sculptures to be shown as a traveling exhibit to museums. A book and documentary about the process of creation will follow.  Click here to read the entire Architectural Digest article about this women-focused artistic effort.


Hough, Cobbs, Theres honored by U.S. Army Women’s Hall of Fame for Hello Girls work 

Mark Hough

Attorney Mark Hough (left), who succeeded in 1978 in lobbying for Congressional recognition for the Hello Girls' military service, nearly fifty years after their return from WWI, was one of three people recognized by the U.S. Army Women’s Foundation as they inducted, collectively, the U.S. Army Telephone Operators of World War I -- AKA the "Hello Girls" -- into the Army Women’s Hall of Fame March 7th on Capitol Hill. Along with Hough, also recognized were Elizabeth Cobbs, author of the definitive "Hello Girls" book, and Jim Theres, director of the award-winning documentary, “The Hello Girls”. Click here to read more about the ceremonies honoring the Hello Girls, and the three special partners of the United States World War I Centennial Commission in the Task Force for gaining Congressional Gold Medal recognition for the Hello Girls.

Cobb OpEd Washington Post

Also last week, Elizabeth Cobbs brought the Hello Girls message to a broader public audience. Cobbs published an OpEd in the Washington Post that urged Congress to support the measure introduced by Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) to honor the women of the WWI U.S. Army Signal Corps Signal Corps with the Congressional Gold Medal.  Click here to read the OpEd and find out more about the proposed Congressional Gold Medal.


Restored memorial in Hudson, OH recognizes 81 veterans of World War I

Hudson, OH memorial

A restored World War I memorial in Hudson, Ohio recognizes 81 veterans of Great War, with help from U.S. World War I Centennial Commission partner reenactors Seth and Garrett Moore. The restoration of this memorial was part of the Commission's 100 Cities/100 Memorials program. Click here to read more about the unveiling of the restored bronze tablet containing the names of 80 men and one woman from Hudson who served in World War I.


Navy Celebrates 100th Anniversary of the Board of Decorations and Medals

Department of he Navy

The Navy celebrates the centennial of the Board of Decorations and Medals. Founded March 6, 1919, the board was established by order of then-Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels to standardize the awarding of medals to service members for extraordinary acts of heroism or distinguished service. The Board was established following the World War I Armistice, and Congress’ creation in February 1919 of two new decorations: The Navy Cross and the Navy Distinguished Service Medal. Click here to read more about how the century-old Board of Decorations and Medals "guarantees authenticity of the high tributes we bestow on our Nation’s warfighters.”


“We’re Home—Now What?” Exhibition at National WWI Museum & Memorial

When You Go Home book

A new Exhibit opening today at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO looks at the challenging transition for American armed forces personnel from War-time duty to civilian life after World War I through archival materials. The U.S. government offered financial, vocational and social resources to the nearly 5 million servicemen and women who began demobilizing in 1919 after nearly half served overseas in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). Click here to read more about this new look at the government and private efforts 100 years ago to the assist returning veteran’s in becoming a “civvie” again.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans:
Writer Elizabeth Foxwell on the Roles & Experiences of Women in the Great War

Elizabeth Foxwell

In March 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 113, host Theo Mayer spoke with writer Elizabeth Foxwell about stories and experiences of female service in WWI, many of which have been neglected or forgotten. Foxwell, a journalist and author focusing on the stories and neglected accounts of and by women who served in various roles in the war. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

The Fingerprint Girls of WWI 2

Episode 113
Highlights: Women's Diverse Roles

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @02:15

Getting to a League Of Nations Draft - Mike Shuster | @10:35

Being Hospitalized in France - Dr. Edward Lengel | @14:30

“Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 2 - Host | @20:50

Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton

K9 Veterans Day and Our Poll | @35:15

Women’s Diverse Roles in WWI - Elizabeth Foxwell | @37:15

Hello Girls Documentary Update - Jim Theres | @45:05


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Writing in the Post-War World of Agatha Christie

By Christopher Huang

Agatha Christie has won the world over with her fabulous detective novels and her star character, Hercule Poirot.

Less renowned is her time in WWI as a nurse, an experience that, without a doubt, inspired her narrative universe. Christopher Huang, the author of A Gentleman's Murder, a detective story about a murder in a gentlemen's club of British 1914-1918 veterans, discusses the influence of WWI on Agatha Christie's work. Uncover Huang's post about one of the greatest detective writers of all time at WWrite this week!


 

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

From Behind Their Lines

Celebrate Pi-Day (3.14) this week with an American doughboy poem from WWI: "Home Is Where the Pie Is!".


Doughboy MIA for week of March 11

Private Percy E. Southard

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Private Percy E. Southard. Born in March, 1897, the son of Henry and Minerva Southard of Reidsville, North Carolina, Private Percy Southard was already a member of the 3rd Regiment of Infantry, North Carolina National Guard, when America entered WW1 in April, 1917. His unit – Company G of Reidsville – was federalized on 06AUG1917 and sent to Camp Sevier, South Carolina to prepare for overseas service. There the company became Company G, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Division. Fighting strength for the units of the 30th were then built up by drafts of men coming in from Camps Jackson and Taylor. Private Southard shipped ‘Over There’ on 12MAY1918 aboard the transport Bohemian, departing from Boston, Mass. Overseas, the division was brigaded with the British, first in the Ypres Sector up in Belgium. By August, however, they had been transferred to the British 4th Brigade, in the Somme Sector, to take part in the coming ‘Final Offensive.’

At 5:50 am on 29SEPT1918, the 120th Infantry was sent over the top in the area of Bellicourt, near the St. Quentin Canal. It was a section of the line the Germans believed impossible to break and the fighting was intense. Nevertheless, by 11:45 am that day  the 120th had taken Bellicourt. The price had been high though – of the 250 man Company G, some 120 of them had been killed or wounded. One of the killed was Private Percy Southard. Nothing further is known of his case at this time.

His death was announced in the papers back home on 01NOV1918, while his father did not receive official word until 12NOV1918. His mother had died (ostensibly of TB) in June, 1918, while Percy was overseas.

Want to help solve Pvt. Southard’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Collector's Bundle

World War I Collector's Bundle Sale

Collect all commemorative coins and lapel pins in one purchase, with a nice discount! 

  • Coins: Each piece is die-struck, bronze alloy, with nice gravity (unlike cheaper zinc coins)
  • Enamel inlay provides premium detailing and finish
  • Each coin and pin comes with its own commemorative packaging, adding value and gifting appeal.

This collection includes a WWI Centennial Coin, Centennial Lapel Pin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Coin, Bells of Peace Commemorative Lapel Pin, and U.S. Victory Lapel Pin.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation women aviators


Vincent A. Luza

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Vincent A. Luza

Submitted by: Lydia Luza Mousner {granddaughter}

Vincent A. Luza was born in 1895. Vincent Luza served in World War I with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1920.

Story of Service

Vincent Aloysius Luza was born on May 2, 1895 in Bryan, Brazos County, Texas. His parents, Vincent and Mary Luza, and grandparents, Baltazar and Francis Gibble Luza, immigrated through the Port of Galveston in 1873 from Praha, Moravia. He was also the grandson of Frank and Angelina (Honozak) Luza. V.A.

Luza attended Allen Academy in Bryan, Texas. He was drafted into the army in 1918 and was assigned to the 344th Field Artillery in Battery F at Camp Travis, TX.

On March 4, 1918, the regiment with its two batteries of guns and six hundred-odd animals marched out to Camp Bullis (Leon Springs) for target practice. It was at Camp Bullis that reconnaissance gun squads were first able to put into practice their gun drill, which had in the beginning been executed on make-shift carriages of wood and later perfected by work on the eight three-inch pieces which had been assigned to the regiment.

Read Vincent A. Luza's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 5, 2019

Remembering the Great War: An Interview with Dale Archer, Chief of Staff of the U.S. WWI Centennial Commission

Dale Archer

We were happy to see an excellent article, shared with us by Sigma Nu Fraternity Magazine, which is an in-depth interview with the World War I Centennial Commission's Chief of Staff, Dale Archer (left), about the National World War I Memorial project that he has been managing for the past three years. The article notes that "World War I’s impact on the world, and American society in particular, is fading from our collective memory, but Dale Archer is working to ensure we never forget the sacrifices made or the legacy the 'war to end all wars' left behind."  Click here to read the entire article about Dale's ongoing effort to get the national World War I Memorial built in Washington, DC.


Digging Into History: World War I Trench Restoration in Seicheprey, France

Christine Pittsley

Christine Pittsley of the Connecticut World War I Centennial Committee (left) writes to tell us about the Seicheprey Trench Restoration Project, a remarkable new Education initiative planned and coordinated by the Connecticut State Library, which will take place in France this summer. The project is designed to create a historic site for tourists to visit, and to teach visitors about this important battle & American contributions to the war. The restoration project will take place in France this coming July, and is sponsored, in part, by the American Legion. Click here to read more about this special project that aims to restore and strengthen the friendship between the people of Connecticut and the people of Seicheprey.


Popular World War I Exhibit Extended at North Carolina Museum of History

NC Museum exhibit

Due to popular demand, the North Carolina Museum of History will extend one of its most-loved exhibits, North Carolina and World War I. The exhibit will now be open through May 27, 2019 (Memorial Day). "North Carolina & World War I" is a free, award-winning exhibit commemorating the centennial of U.S. entry into World War I and focuses on North Carolina’s role in the War to End All Wars on the western front in France and Belgium. Visitors will experience a re-created trench warfare environment to discover what life was like for Tar Heel soldiers, who entered the war in 1917. Click here to read more about how the World War I installation has cemented "its status as the most-visited temporary exhibit ever created by the North Carolina Museum of History."


Not Every Woman Who Served With the U.S. Military During World War I Got the Same Treatment. Here’s Why.

Yeomanette

As Women's History Month begins this March, author Pamela D. Toler, whose new book Women Warriors: An Unexpected History was recently published, takes a look at the different attitudes and experiences encountered during (and after) World War I by women who volunteered to serve in the American armed forces during the Great War. As Toler notes: "The Navy’s 'yeomanettes' and the Army’s Hello Girls were the first American women to openly serve in (or at least with) the military. And, though they served in the same war for the same nation, their experiences differed greatly." Click here to read the entire insightful article on the TIME magazine web site.


Bessie Bendt made a name for herself as Sioux Falls' first 'conductorette' in WWI

Conductorette

As well as serving in the armed forces, American women in World War I stepped forward to fill other traditionally male roles and occupations that were emptied by the mobilization of men into uniform. Take the case of Bessie Bendt, a trailblazer in Sioux Falls, SD as the city's first 'conductorette' during World War I. When her new husband Otto, who was working for the city’s electric trolley company, was called to military duty in June of 1918, Bessie stepped forward to keep the commuter rails running as the first female to serve in the role of a conductor for the Sioux Falls Traction System. Click here to read more about Bessie, and the role she pioneered in supporting the American war effort.


Public Invited to Lander University Symposium on The South and WWI

Lander U Symposium

On Thursday, March 14, and Friday, March 15, Lander University will host a two-day symposium on the far-reaching effects that World War I had on the American South. The symposium will feature panel discussions on World War I’s impact on women and patriotism; the U.S. military and foreign policy; Southern agriculture and economy; and race relations in the South.Click here to read more about this ambitious symposium that originated in observation of the lack of published material on the topic of the South and World War I.


Effort underway to restore the WWI Monument at the Mohave County, Arizona Superior Courthouse

AZ Memorial plaque

Businesses, organizations and individuals all throughout Mohave County came together in 1928 to erect a monument dedicated to those who served in World War I. Now that the passage of time and a few bad actors have led to the deteriorating condition of the monument, there’s a group of veterans leading another community effort, this time to restore the World War I monument at the Mohave County Superior Courthouse. Bob Wallace, director of the Arizona Military Order of Devil Dog Charities, notes that “The monument was to recognize the service and dedication of those young kids that went to WWI. They were 18, 19-year-old. This monument is for the memory of those folks that went into what they call the ‘War to end all wars’ and preserved the planet.” Click here to read more about what Wallace and others are doing to rescue the neglected memorial and restore it to its original condition.


A Chambersburg soldier and his family write letters through World War I

Chambersburg soldier

Writing on the Chambersburg, PA PublicOpinion newspaper web site, Mike Marotte tells the story of his Great Uncle Lawrence E. Funk, who served in the U.S. Army's Remount Squadron #302 during World War I, through the lens of the many letters and postcards exchanged between the soldier and his family in Pennsylvania during his stateside training and the postcards that he sent home from deployment to Europe. Click here to read more about how this wartime correspondence illuminates life on the battlefield and the American home front during World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Historian's Corner:
Dr. Patricia Fara on Women's Rights post-WWI in the United Kingdom

Dr. Patricia Fara

In March 1st's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 112, host Theo Mayer spoke with Cambridge University's Dr. Patricia Fara about the effect of World War I on women's rights in the United Kingdom. We're entering the centennial period when American women finally succeeded in getting the vote, but women's suffrage was a global issue these days 100 years ago. Click here to read the entire transcript of this article, and find out how women's suffrage was a trans-Atlantic issue in 1919.

Historian's Corner:
Dr. Charissa Threat on African American Women in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps

Dr. Charissa Threat

In February 22nd's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 111, host Theo Mayer spoke with historian and Chapman University Professor Charissa Threat about the participation of African American women in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. These women faced systemic discrimination along the lines of race and gender, yet managed to serve despite these barriers. Click here to read the entire transcript of the interview, and learn more about the 18 African American Nurses that joined the U.S. Army Nurse Corp.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Sculptor's Art - Sabin Howard

Episode #112
Highlights: The Sculptor's Art

Host: Theo Mayer

100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @02:10

Mission to Moscow - Mike Shuster | @09:35

A “Y” girl sets up a library - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20

Announcing WWI Themed “Fleet Week” in NYC - Host | @20:20

“Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 1 - Host | @21:10Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton

Historians Corner: Women’s Suffrage in the UK - Dr. Patricia Fara | @27:35

Remembering Veterans: Choctaw Code talkers in WWI - Sarah Sawyer | @34:55

Speaking WWI: Scrounge - Host | @42:50

Dispatch Newsletter Highlights - Host | @44:50


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

The Debt of WWII Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans Part 3:

French Journalist Traces Her Breton Family Through Both World Wars

WWrite Interviews Stéphanie Trouillard.

French journalist and regular WWrite blog contributor Stéphanie Trouillard has undertaken a formidable task: chronicling innovative histories of WWI and WWII... at the same time. For five years and counting, she has used social media to tell the stories of WWI for the French media.

She has also just published her successful first book, My Uncle from the Shadows, a memoir of her great-uncle who died in the WWII French Resistance. In this week's post, she sits down to talk with WWrite about the ways her research and writing on both wars have intertwined to tell a tale of her own family's experience of loss and survival in 1914-1918 and in 1939-1944.

This is the third in the blog series entitled, “The Debt of WWII French Resistance Writers to WWI Veterans.” Read Trouillard's story about one generation and two wars at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Aftermath

A sister's poem for her brother killed in the first weeks of the war: "Aftermath." Mary E. Boyle writes, "Let the stones of literary criticism fall from your hands, or use them to build a cairn, as we do in the north, to the memory of a very gallant young soldier, and a great mutual love."


Doughboy MIA for week of March 4

Wallace Green

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Sergeant Wallace Green, DSC. Very little is known about Wallace Green’s early life. He was born and raised in the little town of Eure, North Carolina and may very well have been a pre-war soldier, serving with the 9th Cavalry. What is known is that he sailed as a corporal from Hoboken, New Jersey, bound for ‘Over There’ aboard the transport Covington on 09APR1918, assigned to Company M, 6th Infantry Regiment, 5th ‘Red Diamond’ Division.

The 6th Infantry Regiment is one of the oldest of the ‘regular army’ regiments in the army inventory, tracing its roots back to 1812. In November, 1917, while still in the States, the 6th was assigned to the assembling 5th Division. Then once overseas, when the 1st US Army was organized in France to perpetrate the St. Mihiel Offensive (set to begin on 12SEPT1918), the 5th Division was one of the divisions assigned to it on 10AUG1918. At that time, however, the division was serving in the Vosges Sector and preparing for a limited offensive of its own.

At 4:04 am on the morning of 17AUG1917, after a 10 minute artillery barrage, the 6th Infantry Regiment launched an attack against the village of Frapelle in that sector. Two minutes into the attack, a heavy German counter barrage began to fall on the American trenches and the attacking Doughboys. Nevertheless, the 6th pressed on doggedly and by 6:30 am had reached and liberated the town of Frapelle, freeing it from four years of German occupation. However, now Sergeant Wallace Green wasn’t with them – he had been killed in action during the initial attack and in the process earned the Distinguished Service Cross. Reports of him being both KIA and MIA appear simultaneously in papers back home as early as 24SEPT1918. On 05OCT1919 his award of the DSC was officially announced:

GREEN, Wallace Sergeant, Company M, 6th Infantry.
For extraordinary heroism in action at Frapelle, France,
August 17, 1918. He unhesitatingly and with great coolness
and courage went forward under a heavy enemy barrage
to destroy wire entanglements and
continued this hazardous work until killed.

General Orders No. 15, War Department, 1919

Sergeant Green’s name is among the 284 names which grace the Tablets of the Missing at the beautiful St. Mihiel American Cemetery at Thiaucourt, France.

Want to help shed some light on Sgt. Green’s case?  Consider making a donation' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative tie - back

World War One Custom Silk Tie

This 100% woven silk tie has been custom created for the World War One Centennial Commission.  This red silk tie features World War One-era aircraft and the official logo of the Centennial Commission on the back.  This beautiful tie also comes packaged in a 2 piece box with the Doughboy seal printed on the top.  Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation Women Marines


Philip Martin

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Phillip Martin

 

Submitted by: Michael Rauh {Grand Nephew}

Philip Martin was born around 1892, Philip Martin served in World War I with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

In 1958, I was a 5th grade student. While studying world history, my class learned about World War I, also known as the Great War. We read about the terrible battles where trench warfare, poison gas, and modern weaponry took many lives. I learned then that America had entered the war on April 6, 1917.

To help mark the 100th anniversary of these events, I want to tell my family the story I learned so many years ago.

At the end of the term where I learned about World War I, there was an old black & white movie on TV about the life of Sergeant Alvin York. He was one of the many American heroes who fought in the great war. For his actions, he received many awards and was the most decorated soldier of the war. I was very impressed with the movie and was surprised when my mother told me my great-uncle was a member of the same infantry unit as Sgt. York, and that he had fought in the same battles.

Read Philip Martin's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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February 26, 2019

Neal and Sammons

The 369th Experience is in the national spotlight during Black History Month

February is Black History Month, and February 2019 has been a very busy time for telling the story of the African-American heroes of World War I -- and we at the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission are thrilled by the exposure that the Commission-sponsored 369th Experience is getting nationally. Among other high-profile appearances, 369th Experience project leader Stephany Neal, and noted historian (and member of the Commission's Board of Historical Advisors) Dr. Jeffrey Sammons (above) were featured on New York City's ABC 7 "Here and Now" show. Click here to watch the video of that appearance, and get links to other appearances on well-know national programs.


Kansas City Film Premiere Screening of documentary "Pershing's Paths of Glory"

Pershing's Paths of Glory poster

In recognition of the 125th Anniversary of the National Society of Pershing Rifles, the nation's foremost military honor society for ROTC cadets & midshipmen, the Society is hosting a major premiere event in Kansas City, MO, home of the National World War I Museum and Memorial. Pershing's Paths of Glory is a documentary that tells the exceptional story of one of America's greatest military leaders, General John J. Pershing. The story is told by Pershing's living legacy - members of the National Societies of Pershing Rifles, Pershing Angels, and Blackjacks. Click here to read more about this movie, and find out how to get tickets to the premiere event in Kansas City March 15.


National History Day seeks Volunteers and Judges for regional competitions

National History Day logo

National History Day (NHD) is an exciting way for students to develop their civic literacy as well as study and learn about historical issues, such as World War I, and other ideas, people, and events at locations around the country. NHD is seeking is recruiting judges and other volunteers for competitions in Washington, DC and other regions around the nation. NHD is also a partner of the U.S World War I Centennial Commission. Click here to read more about the DC contest and other events around the nation, and discover how you can take part in this forum in which students compete for excellence in historical understanding and exposition.


The Polar Bear Expedition — The True Story Behind America’s Forgotten War in Communist Russia

Polar Bear Expedition soldiers

Even as Germany’s surrender was being signed in a railway car at Compiegne Forest near Paris on November 11, 1918, even as throngs were celebrating in London and New York, Captain Robert Boyd and the men of the U.S. Army’s 339th Infantry Regiment, Company B, were fighting for their lives against hundreds of Bolshevik troops in the snowy, bitterly cold wastes of northern Russia. Writing for the Military History Now web site, historian James Carl Nelson, author of The Polar Bear Expedition: The Heroes of America’s Forgotten Invasion of Russia, 1918-1919, describes the "somewhat bizarre series of events that had brought this contingent of Doughboys to this remote and desolate place: the village of Toulgas on the Dvina River, 150 miles from the relative safety of the frozen port of Archangel on Russia’s northern coast." Click here to get a better understanding of this largely-neglected sideshow of the United States involvement in World War I.


American presence in Germany from 1918-1923 had lasting effects on the culture, ideology and politics of the region

Doughboy on guard occupied Germany

Sit in on any WWI history class in U.S. schools today and you probably won’t hear much about the American occupation of Germany that followed the war and lasted until 1923. Arizona State University (ASU) School of International Letters and Cultures German instructor Christiane Reves thinks that should change and hopes an exhibit now on display in the lobby of the Durham Language and Literature building at ASU will help. On the 100th anniversary of the presence of American occupational forces in the regions between Trier and Koblenz, “Stars and Stripes Above the Rhine: The American Occupation in Germany after World War I” aims to educate ASU students, faculty, staff, and the wider community about the laudable and conciliatory interactions between the Americans and the people who were once their military opponents. Click here to read more about this ASU exhibit which illuminates the effects on the culture and ideological history of the region occupied by the American forces.


A World War I poster still has a lot to teach us about #FoodWaste

Food Waste poster

In a guest blog post for the University of California (UC) Food Observer web site, UC researcher Wendi Gosliner shared this observation: “Food waste presents a major challenge in the United States. Estimates suggest that up to 40% of the food produced nationally never gets consumed, causing substantial economic and environmental harms. Wasted food utilizes vast quantities of precious land, water and human resources, yet rather than nourishing people, it feeds landfills, producing methane gasses that poison the environment. Much of the food waste (43%) occurs at the household level."  Click here to read how Gosliner thinks a World War I poster has advice we’d be well served to heed today in order to address this issue.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Historian's Corner:
Dr. Hal Chase on Fort Des Moines, IA

Dr. Hal Chase

In February 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 109, host Theo Mayer spoke with historian and native Iowan Dr. Hal Chase about Fort Des Moines, Iowa, a significant landmark in African American history. Over 600 African American officers were trained and commissioned at Fort Des Moines, before deploying to France. Click here to read a transcript of this insightful interview.

100 Years in the Making:
Pangolin Editions' Steve Maule

Pangolin

In February 22nd's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 111, host Theo Mayer spoke with Steve Maule, a director at Pangolin Editions. One of the largest and most advanced art foundries in the world, Pangolin will play a crucial role in bringing the National Memorial to life. Click here to read a transcript of the interview as Mr. Maule provides us with incredible insight into the process of bringing an artist's concept into a bronze reality.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Famine resulting from WWI

Episode #111
Highlights: War, Pandemic, Now Famine!

Host: Theo Mayer

In The Headlines This Week - Host | @02:10

War Caused Famine Spreads - Mike Shuster | @07:50

“Y” Girls Serving in War-Torn France - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:05

100 Years in The Making - Pangolin Editions Foundry - Steve Maury | @18:40

Remembering Veterans - 369th Experience Band Concert - From Video | @25:55

Historians Corner - African American Nurses - Dr. Charissa Threat | @36:20

Speaking WWI - Barnstorming - Host | @44:10

Highlights from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host | @49:00

More....


Literature in WWI This Week

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The Story of Freddie Stowers, the First African American Recipient of the WWI Medal of Honor

By Courtney L. Tollison Hartness, Ph.D.
While researching African Americans who served in the WWI American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) from her community, oral historian and Furman history professor Courtney L. Tollison Hartness discovered the compelling story of one soldier whose influential and enduring legacy would have been inconceivable to him.

September 28, 2018, marked the centennial of his death. His name was Freddie Stowers, and he was the first African American Recipient of the WWI Medal of Honor. Yet he didn't receive the award until 73 years after he perished during the Battle of Meuse-Argonne. Read Tollison Hartness' account of uncovering Stowers' legacy this week at WWrite!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Director Peter Jackson has released news of his upcoming J. R. R. Tolkien biographic film that explores the influence of WW1 on the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Read more about Tolkien's "first fellowship" and his grief at losing close friends killed in the First World War.


Doughboy MIA for week of Feb. 25

Wesley J. Creech

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's Doughboy MIA this week is Private Wesley J. Creech. Born 15MAR1886, in Hallsboro, North Carolina, Wesley Jackson Creech was the fourth of six children that Henry and Martha Creech would rear. He signed his 05JUN1917 draft card at Bolton, North Carolina, where he listed himself as a lumber inspector and two months later married Miss Francis Williamson, age 19. Creech received his draft call shortly thereafter, reporting for duty on 01OCT1917 and was sent to Camp Jackson for induction. From there he went to Camp Sevier for infantry training and was placed in Company C, 120 th Infantry Regiment, 30 th ‘Old Hickory’ Division. Departing Boston, Massachusetts for overseas service on 12May1918 aboard the transport Bohemian, Creech’s division was brigaded with the British in the Somme sector that summer. Records show Wesley Creech as being killed in action on 31AUG1918 and buried by a British unit, however later identification of his grave by American Graves Registration personnel proved fruitless. As such, he is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Flanders Field American Cemetery at Waregem, Belgium.

Want to help solve Pvt. Creech’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA at www.usww1cc.org/mia. It takes only a moment and your tax deductible contribution can be as large as you want or as small as $10.00 on our ‘Ten for Them’ program. Your contribution helps us make a full accounting of all 4,423 US MIA’s from WWI, and keeps these lost men from being forgotten. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget jacket

Lest We Forget

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force.  Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Double Donation African American Nurses


Francesco Di Cresce

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Francesco Di Cresce

 

Submitted by: Frank M. Seleno {Grand Nephew}

Francesco Di Cresce was born around 1894.  Francesco Di Cresce served in World War 1 with the the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Francesco Di Cresce was born in the small hill town of Sora Italy located in the commune of Lazio and the province of Frosinone. Francesco was the 3rd child and oldest boy of seven (7) children of parents Pietro and Lucia Di Cresce (Matacchione).

Older sisters Vincenza (1) , Restitutta (2) and younger brothers Antonio (4) , Giulio/Julius (5), Innocenco (6) and Sante (7). They were considered “contadini”. People who made their living farming. Francesco and Restitutta were close and when young would go to the market in town to sell the tomatoes and zucchini grown by the family. Being called a “contadino” in Italy was not an insult. But in America, the new way of thinking was like this. The moment an Italian peasant sets foot on Ellis Island, he becomes a “Signore”. A gentleman.

Read Francesco Di Cresce's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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February 19, 2019

Letters home from African American soldiers share details of their separate and unequal treatment in World War I

African American letter

During Black History Month, we have been bringing forward a number of little-known, unique stories about the experiences of African Americans in World War I. Today, we offer a remarkable article, created by Mr. Calvin Mitchell, that gives a broad, insightful overview of the experiences of those 360,000 African Americans who served -- based on their letters home. Mr. Mitchell is Research Associate, and former Assistant Curator of Philately, at the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum. Click here to read the entire thoughtful article on the African American experience in WWI.


Making of the Novel “Anumpa Warrior: Choctaw Code Talkers of World War I” 

Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer

Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer had always known the story of the handful of Choctaws who used the tribal language to save lives and help bring a swifter end to the First World War. However, over the years she discovered that this "fantastic and monumental part of our American and military history was still unknown to the public."  So she decided to write the novel Anumpa Warrior: Choctaw Code Talkers of World War I. to make the story more accessible. But when Sarah began educating herself on WWI doing research for the novel, she quickly "learned how little I knew about it beyond the black and white Sergeant York movie, a staple in my home when I was growing up."  Click here to read more about the research that spanned years and continents to help bring the story of the Choctaw Code Talkers alive again in 21st Century America.


A Coast Guardsman At Sea in WWI

Foulkes

A Coast Guardsman’s photos and letters home provide a ‘from-the-deckplates’ view of patrol service in the Atlantic, in this article from Naval History Magazine by Commander Stephen Surko, USN (Ret).  Frederick Richard Foulkes, just four days after enlisting in the U.S. Coast Guard in 1917, wrote home to ask his family to send him his new camera. Thereafter, Foulkes wrote frequently to his family in Philadelphia and made ample use of the camera he had requested—the result being a rich trove of letters and photographs. Click here to read excerpts from his letters, along with a sampling of his dozens of photographs, that provide an up-close look a century later at wartime duty on board a heralded cutter of Squadron 2, Division 6, Atlantic Fleet Patrol Forces.


Troopship Rescue from Fire Island!

SIgnal flag to grounded troop ship

In the early morning of January 1st 1919 Surfman Roger Smith reported sighting the U.S.S. Northern Pacific a few miles southeast of Fire Island, Coast Guard Station #83. Unbeknownst to Smith, the initial report was the beginning of an 18 day saga that remains one of the most amazing, yet often forgotten, rescue stories of World War I. Harry Kidd is a volunteer at the U.S. National Archives working on textual and photographic digitization projects, and a former Navy photographer.  He came across this story while researching military photographers. Click here to read the entire story of why the troopship carrying wounded soldiers back from Europe got stuck on a Fire Island sandbar, and how a potential disaster was averted.


Harder than the War: Disabled Doughboys Fight for Recognition

Wounded

Dr. Ed Lengel, noted author & historian, explores on his blog some of the post- World War I reminiscences of veteran Harry Zander, who in his memoir of wartime and postwar experiences, Thirteen Years in Hell, published in 1933, chronicled what Lengel describes as the  "many thousands" of disabled WWI veterans who "would die young from war-related illnesses in shelters, flophouses and small hospitals, their sacrifices unacknowledged and forgotten." Click here to read the entire article regarding how America's WWI wounded and disabled too frequently became casualties a second time in the postwar nation.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

A Teacher on Teaching WWI:
Michael Sandstrom

Michael Sandstrom

On February 1st's edition of the WWI Centennial News Podcast, Episode 108, host Theo Mayer spoke with high school teacher and National History Day's Legacies of World War I participant Michael Sandstrom about his experiences teaching history, especially World War I history, to the current generation of high school students. Sandstrom is a Social Science teacher at Chadron High School in northwestern Nebraska, about 20 minutes from the South Dakota border. Click here to read a transcript of the entire interview.

The Civil War and Beyond:
the Connection Between Reconstruction and the Great War

Carol Mosley Braun

On February 8th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 109, host Theo Mayer observes that in telling the story of African Americans in World War I, in order to put the history into context, we really need to go back an additional generation to what is known as the Reconstruction Era. With the help of Senator Carol Mosley Braun (right), this episode explores how changes to the U.S. Constitution and in American society set the stage for African Americans to serve gallantly in World War I. Click here to read the transcript of this episode of the podcast.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Georges Clemenceau and Woodrow Wilson

Episode #110
Highlights: The League of Nations

Host: Theo Mayer

Wilson Explains The League of Nations - Host | @02:10

A Seat at the Table: Japan - Host | @14:55

Turmoil at the Conference - Mike Shuster | @18:45

Formation of the American Legion - David Rehbein | @23:25

James Reese Europe - Jason Moran | @30:05

Fort Des Moines & Black Medical Officer Training - Doug Fisher | @35:55

Speaking WWI: GI - Host | @43:10

Articles & Posts: The Dispatch - Host | @45:20


Literature in WWI This Week

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First I Said No

By Mary L. Doyle

When Army veteran Mary L. Doyle was first asked to help write the 100-year-old history of Ft. George G. Meade, a history that began with WWI, she said no.

Primarily a fiction writer, Doyle had only co-authored two works of nonfiction: memoirs of African American women in uniform because she felt compelled to bear witness their untold raw, honest experiences. When she did agree to write about Ft. Meade, she discovered that she had developed a knack for uncovering what had been forgotten.

In this post, Doyle discusses the journey she took to bring 100 years of a rich, diverse history together, a journey in which she discovered African American doctors who volunteered during WWI. Read Doyle's Ft. Meade adventure at WWrite this week!


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Charm Pendant

Charm Pendant

Proudly wearing the WWI 100 Years charm pendant is a fantastic way to let folks serving in the military, along with veterans, know that we still honor those who served our country one hundred years ago. This satin nickel charm, worn on a necklace or bracelet, is a simple, yet meaningful, way to display your pride and remember those who sacrificed throughout our nation’s great history. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes towards funding the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


African American Soldiers


Joseph Thomas Hughes

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

Joseph Thomas Hughes


Submitted by: Gerald Hathaway (Grandson}

Joseph Thomas Hughes born around 1895. Joseph Hughes served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Joseph Thomas Hughes (1895 - 1933)

By Gerald Hathaway, October 9, 2018

It was a hundred years ago today, or maybe tomorrow, that Pvt. Joseph Thomas Hughes was wounded in action, in France. If today is that anniversary, the casualty was incurred while attacking the Germans for control of Hill 269 in the Meuse-Argonne, 80 kilometers east of Reims, not far from the Belgian and Luxembourg borders. If the hundredth anniversary of his wound is instead tomorrow, he was wounded while successfully defending Hill 269 from being retaken by the Germans. The uncertainty of the date of the wound is due to conflicting reports. After all: the fog of war.

Joseph Thomas Hughes was born in Philadelphia in 1895, of Irish immigrant parents, who met in Philadelphia. His father, Thomas Hughes, died when Joseph was nine years old. When America joined the Great War, Joseph, then not quite 22, said goodbye to Philadelphia and enlisted, on May 5, 1917, reporting at Fort Slocum, in New Rochelle, New York. He was assigned to the newly formed First Engineers, First Division, American Expeditionary Forces. On August 7, he boarded the SS Finland in Hoboken, New Jersey and set sail for Saint-Nazaire, France, arriving August 20, 1917. His ship’s convoy fended off U-Boat attacks.

Read Joseph Thomas Hughes' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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