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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

Henry John Small

Submitted by: Margaret (Sunbury) Kanzleiter {Great Niece}

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Henry John Small born around June 15, 1889. Henry Small served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

I never knew Uncle Had since he died in 1940, but my Great Aunt Blanche Small would always have us place flowers on his grave during Memorial Day services.

I have learned that he was a member of Co G 30 Infantry, 3rd Division. He served overseas from April 1, 1918 to June 28, 1919. He was honorably discharged on July 7, 1919. His records show that he was involved in the following offenses: Marne Sector Offensive; Meuse Argonne Offensive; and the St Michiel Offensive.

After learning this I can now understand why my Great Aunt said that he died early in life due to complications from the gas that he was exposed to in the war. The family is proud of his service to his country. We wish we could have known him.

 

John Edward Kaiser

Submitted by: Margaret (Sunbury) Kanzleiter {Granddaughter}

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John Edward Kaiser born around 13 April 1895. John Kaiser served in World War 1 with the United States Army Air Corps . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather will always be remembered by all of his grandchildren for marching in the Gettysburg Memorial Day Parade in his full WWI uniform. He was very proud of his service to his country.

He became a mechanic in the 74th Aero Squadron which later changed it's name to the 486th Aero Squadron.

He was an avid outdoorsman, loving to fish and hunt until his death in 1978.

 

Paul A. Stehling

Submitted by: Barbara Reinke {Granddaughter}

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Paul A Stehling born around 1895. Paul Stehling served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Pvt Paul A Stehling was born and raised in Fredericksburg Texas. He was a second generation American but also spoke German.

He served in the Ordnance Section. Basic Training was at Camp Hancock Georgia before being deployed to France.

After the war he married Nelda Heep Stehling and they had three children. He built a home which still stands today.

He was an early member of the Central Texas Electric Coop. He was a hard working farmer and rancher until his death in 1980.

 

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

Submitted by: Patti Jacobsen {great-niece}

John Jack Thomas Nilles

John "Jack" Thomas Nilles born around 1889. John "Jack" Nilles served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

My great-uncle, John Thomas “Jack” Nilles was born 24 March 1889 in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, the eighth and youngest child of Peter Hubert Nilles and Anna Margaret (Beth) Nilles. He attended St. Luke’s Catholic School through the eighth grade.

By 1909, Jack decided to learn the lumbering and building material business and he started at the bottom in order to gain practical knowledge in his field. He worked at Schmitt Lumber in Two Rivers and later at Farrell Lumber in Algoma, Wisconsin.

He was socially active, a member of the Columbus Club and served as club secretary for a number of years. As a musician, he played cornet with the local band and attended local dances.

Jack registered for the draft in the first registration on 5 June 1917: for all men between ages 21 and 30. His registration states that no one was dependent on him for support.

Read more: John "Jack" Thomas Nilles

Francesco Di Cresce

Submitted by: Frank M. Seleno {Grand Nephew}

Francesco Di Cresce mug

Francesco Di Cresce was born around 1894.  Francesco Di Cresce served in World War 1 with the the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Francesco Di Cresce was born in the small hill town of Sora Italy located in the commune of Lazio and the province of Frosinone. Francesco was the 3rd child and oldest boy of seven(7) children of parents Pietro and Lucia Di Cresce (Matacchione).

Older sisters Vincenza (1) , Restitutta (2) and younger brothers Antonio (4) , Giulio/Julius (5), Innocenco (6) and Sante (7). They were considered “contadini”. People who made their living farming. Francesco and Restitutta were close and when young would go to the market in town to sell the tomatoes and zucchini grown by the family. Being called a “contadino” in Italy was not an insult. But in America, the new way of thinking was like this. The moment an Italian peasant sets foot on Ellis Island, he becomes a “Signore”. A gentleman.

Born on November 25, 1894 Francesco was born under the Zodiac sign of the Archer Sagittarius. This sign symbolizes someone who aims high, has a positive outlook on life and has great charisma. Those traits surely helped Francesco who at the young age of 18 years traveled to the United States in search of opportunity and a better life for his family. Francesco Di Cresce was the first of his family on U.S. soil.

Read more: Francesco Di Cresce

Joseph Thomas Hughes

Submitted by: Gerald Hathaway (Grandson}

Joseph Hughes image

Joseph Thomas Hughes born around 1895. Joseph Hughes served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Joseph Thomas Hughes (1895 - 1933)

By Gerald Hathaway, October 9, 2018

It was a hundred years ago today, or maybe tomorrow, that Pvt. Joseph Thomas Hughes was wounded in action, in France. If today is that anniversary, the casualty was incurred while attacking the Germans for control of Hill 269 in the Meuse-Argonne, 80 kilometers east of Reims, not far from the Belgian and Luxembourg borders. If the hundredth anniversary of his wound is instead tomorrow, he was wounded while successfully defending Hill 269 from being retaken by the Germans. The uncertainty of the date of the wound is due to conflicting reports. After all: the fog of war.

Read more: Joseph Thomas Hughes

Hugh Thomas Nelson, Jr.

Submitted by: Thomas P. Nelson, Jr. Grandson

 

Hugh Thomas Nelson JrPNGHugh Thomas Nelson Jr. born around 1876. Hugh Nelson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

During World War I, Hugh Thomas Nelson, Jr. was commissioned a Captain in the Medical Corps and ordered to Camp Lee, Virginia, where he was placed in charge of sanitation. He became the commanding officer of the 318th Field Hospital.

He was later commissioned a major and sailed overseas with the division on May 25, 1918 aboard the ship Mercury, returned to the States in the early 1919.

Among major engagements in which his service was rendered were the Argonne and Meuse Offensive.

Major Nelson would begin the effort to leave France on Christmas Day 1919 when he received word that Edith, his wife, was very ill. Edith, on October 15, 1918, gave birth to Hugh Thomas Nelson III in Charlottesville, who died two days later and is buried in the family cemetery plot at Riverview Cemetery in Charlottesville.

Read more: Hugh Thomas Nelson Jr.

Henry Eugene Quinn

Submitted by: Diana Quinn Cotton {Granddaughter}

Henry Eugene Quinn

Henry Eugene Quinn born around 1899. Henry Quinn served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

PFC Henry E. Quinn served as a company runner in Co. F 28th Infantry 1st Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army, during World War I and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, Croix de Guerre, and Victory Medal with Five Battle Clasps.

My grandfather, Henry Eugene Quinn, was born in Anniston, Alabama, on January 31, 1899. He was the fourth of eleven children of William Eugene Quinn (1865-1945) and Emma Langdon (Fowler) Quinn (1873-1963). He stood 5’ 8” tall, had red hair, blue eyes, a fair complexion, and was covered in freckles. His nicknames were “Bud” (at home) and “Red” (in the Army).

In his World War I memoirs, written many years after the war, Henry wrote:

“March 1917—Applied for enlistment at Monroe (LA), was examined by a colonel Dr. who was rather rough in criticizing my physical condition, stated that I looked like a picked chicken, etc., account of being so skinny. I was not use to such criticism & talked rather rough to him in return. Sgt. was in the background motioning me to hush, etc., but I said my say. Col. flared up & stated, ‘He will do Sgt—I will get a waver on his weight tonight.’ I was 11 lbs. under weight.”

Henry briefly returned to Swartz, LA, to inform his family he had joined the Army and to tell them goodbye. His father “shook hands & told me that I had been my own boss for some time, but now I had a real boss.”

 

Read more: Henry Eugene Quinn

Elwyn J Frazier Sr.

Submitted by: Michael Owen Frazier {Grandson}

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Elwyn J Frazier Sr. born around 1895. Elwyn Frazier served in World War 1 with the United States Arm . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas F. Herron

Submitted by: Betty Perkins {Great Niece}

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Thomas F. Herron born around 1880. Thomas Herron served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more: Thomas F Herron

Boyd Willard Stone

Submitted by: Donald Stone {Grandson}

Boys WIllard Stone mug

Boys Willard Stone born around 1901. Boyd Stone served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My paternal grandpa, Boyd Willard Stone, enlisted as a private in the United States Army on September 17, 1917 at the age of 16 (yes, he fibbed about his age).

After basic training at Camp Colt in Gettysburg, PA he was ultimately assigned to Co. B, 5th Machine Gun Bn., 2nd Infantry Div.

His WW I Victory Medal shows service in the following engagements: AISNE, AISNE MARNE, ST. MIKIEL, MEUSE ARGONE, DEFENSIVE SECTOR and CHATEAU THIERRY. He received two "wound stripes": gassed in the Troyon Sector 3/27/18, and a shrapnel wound at Chateau Thierry. He was also awarded the Silver Star.

He was discharged August 14, 1919. After the war he moved to St. Louis, MO and married Olive E. Aldrich (Stone) and began work for the Terminal Railroad Assn.

During the '20's and '30's he and grandma had a daughter and son (my Dad), and in 1943 he enlisted in the Army once again (this time as a Captain) and was assigned to the 2nd Military Railway Service Unit and sent to England to prepare for the invasion of Europe.

Read more: Boyd Willard Stone

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