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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

Willie Edwin Mutz

Submitted by: Robert {Grandson}

Willie Edwin MutzWillie Edwin Mutz born around 1899, Willie Mutz served in World War 1 with the the United States Navy . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Was only 6 years old when my Grandfather passed away. From what I learned: He was on a ship that provided convoy security from the East Coast to the UK.

Pictures below.

 

 

Read more: Willie Edwin Mutz

Fred Himmelberger

Submitted by: Wayne Pieper {Grandson}

Fred Himmelberger image

Fred Himmelberger born around 1897. Fred Himmelberger served in World War 1 with the United States Marine Corps. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Applied for enlistment Feb. 25, 1917 at New York, NY. Commissioned Corporal May 1, 1918. US Marine Corp. 51st Co., 5th Regiment, 2nd Division AEF.

Served in France from June 27, 1917 to Sept. 15, 1918. France: Verdun Section March 17 to May 5, 1918. Bois de Belleau, Chateau-Thierry Section June 1 to June 6, 1918.

Awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French Government and a Bronze Star for the US Government for courage and bravery displayed in carrying his wounded comrades to the rear under a violent bombardment. Was wounded in action on June 6, 1918 and awarded the Purple Heart.

Arrived back in the U.S. on Sept. 30, 1918. Discharged Feb. 26, 1919.

 

Louis Z. Daris

Submitted by: Charles L. Daris {Son}

no photo 300

Louis Z. Daris born around 1895. Louis Daris served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Enlisted, boot camp in Syracuse, training in Camp Green N.C., attached to 4th Div. 47th Inf. Combat in St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne. Served in Army of Occupation in Germany. Sergeant.

Writing the memoirs of his participation in the American Expeditionary Forces twelve years after the end of the First World War, my father proudly declared that the time he was in uniform was “the greatest experience of my life.” Reading them, one can sense that he relished every minute of it, including terrifying moments in combat or coping with mind-numbing mud whether in the trenches or on his never-ending marches. But he never lost his sense of humor. The ubiquitous mud and frequent rain often prompted him and his buddies to remark with no little irony, “sunny France!”

He served in the 4th Division, 47th Infantry, Company A. Throughout his service he wrote copious notes in the small diaries he kept with him. These treasured memories made it possible for him to narrate his adventures in detail years later. He also researched the origins of the U.S. participation in the war and the history of his own regiment and incorporated his findings into his memoirs.

Read more: Louis Z Daris

Jaget Singh

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

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Jaget Singh served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Private Jaget Singh was born about 1889 in British India. Prior to 1918,Singh immigrated to the United States and settled in Tacoma, Washington.

Private Singh was inducted into the U.S. Army in Imperial County, California on October 10, 1918. He was assigned to the 166 Depot Brigade at Camp Lewis, Washington until his discharge. He did not serve overseas.

Singh was honorably discharged on December 9, 1918.

Read more: Jaget Singh

Ruben Hudlow

Submitted by: Don Pischner {Friend}

no photo 300Ruben Hudlow born around 1887, Ruben Hudlow served in World War 1 with the the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Ruben Hudlow 77th Div 308th Inf Co A Survivor of "Lost Battalion." Joined Army and served with lifelong friend Irvin Pischner. I knew them both.

 

Joined in June 1918 with friend Irvin G. Pischner. Each assigned to 77th Div 308 Inf Co M and Co A respectively. Ruby Hudlow survivor of "Lost Battalion." I knew them both in my youth.

Ruben Hudlow and Irvin G. Pischner were WWI Veterans.  They were U.S. Army soldiers assigned to the 77th DIvision - 308th Infantry, Companies M and A, respectively. I knew them both -- Irvin, my dad, and Ruben, his friend, a survivor of the "Lost Battalion."

In my youth, during my time with them, some two decades after their Army discharge, I now recall very little discussion of the "forgotten war." My dad told few stories. Ruby only explained that his missing finger resulted from a wartime gunshot. I wish that I would have been more inquisitive.

Read more: Ruben Hudlow

Irvin G Pischner

Submitted by: Don Pischner {Son}

Irvin G Pischner

Irvin G Pischner born around 1893. Irvin Pischner served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Joined in June 1918 with friend Ruby Hudlow. Each assigned to 77th Div 308 Inf Co M and Co A respectively. Ruby Hudlow survivor of "Lost Battalion." I knew them both in my youth.

Irvin G. Pischner and Ruben Hudlow were WWI Veterans.  They were U.S. Army soldiers assigned to the 77th DIvision - 308th Infantry, Companies M and A, respectively. I knew them both -- Irvin, my dad, and Ruben, his friend, a survivor of the "Lost Battalion."

They grew up together in Northern Idaho, signed up together in June 1918 for military duty, trained together at Camps Lewis, Kearney, and Upton.  They Joined New York's finest -- the Liberty Division -- DOughboys identified by the Statue of Liberty insignia. Each served in France's Argonne-Meuse, after which they returned home to Idaho to enjoy long, healthy lives.

In my youth, during my time with them, some two decades after their Army discharge, I now recall very little discussion of the "forgotten war." My dad told few stories. Ruby only explained that his missing finger resulted from a wartime gunshot. I wish that I would have been more inquisitive.

Read more: Irvin G. Pischner

Robert (Harold) Harold Cromie

Submitted by: James H Keil {grand nephew}

no photo 300Robert (Harold) Harold Cromie born around 1892. Robert (Harold) Cromie served in World War 1 with the a non-government service organization. The enlistment was in 1914 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Robert Harold Cromie was born in New Castle, Lawrence, PA, USA, to Robert and Anna Beck Cromie. He worked in the tin mill in New Castle, along with his father and brothers. In August of 1914, he is listed in a New Castle News story as having been stationed at Fort Totten in NY with Coastal Defenses. We have been able to find no official record of this service.

His obituary also indicates he enlisted with Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1914 and served four years in France, followed by one year in occupied Germany. This seems to follow family history, which also adds that he was gassed in the trenches, and suffered permanent nerve damage, which causes one half of his body to sweat profusely, while the other was completely dry.

Read more: Robert (Harold) Harold Cromie

Morris Polsky

Submitted by: James Taub {Great-Great-Nephew}

Morris Polsky image

Morris Polsky was born around 1885. Morris Polsky served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 Morris Polsky was born in Lincoln, Nebraska sometime in the 1880s. His parents were Eastern European Jews who had immigrated only a few years previously. Morris enlisted in the United States Army on May 5th, 1917. By May 7th he was at Fort Logan near Denver, and by the 16th was at Fort Scott in San Francisco. Finally, on the 22nd of June he found himself at Fort Bliss near El Paso, Texas, where he completed his training as an artilleryman. He proved so proficient that by the 17th of September, he was appointed Sergeant. His was assigned then, as an NCO, to the 18th Field Artillery Regiment. Morris had no previous military experience.

The fact that he was so rapidly promoted shows us that the Army’s command structure was not prepared for the great influx of men into the military after war was declared. As in Morris’ case, it had to be rapidly expanded.

Read more: Morris Polsky

Harriet Louise Carfrae

Submitted by: Mary Rohrer Dexter

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Harriet Louise Carfrae served in World War 1 with the Red Cross. The dates of service are: Known 5/1917-5/1920.

Story of Service

 

Born Ninety miles south of Lake Erie at Norwalk, Ohio on January 10, 1879 to immigrant parents, Harriett Louise Carfrae moved west with her family to Miami County, Indiana before her first birthday.   Her father, James, was Scottish and worked as a boilermaker for the railroad.  Her mother, Margaret Dillon Carfrae, was Irish, but arrived in the United States by immigrating first to Canada.   Harriett had curly, dark hair, light eyes and wore round wire glasses.  It can be guessed that she was not very tall from the average size of others with the same nationality of her parents.  

When she was 18, Harriett was part of the leadership of a Christian youth organization named, The Christian Endeavor, which was involved in the temperance movement.   She was known as Hattie by her friends. When she turned 21, she moved to St Louis in order to attend the Baptist Sanitarium Hospital School of Nursing.  She graduated with 17 other women in 1903.  The school of nursing was a two-year program which enrolled its first students in 1895, indicating Harriet was part of the school’s seventh graduating class.  At some point, the nursing school expanded to a three-year program. 

Read more: Harriet Louise Carfrae

Private Abdul Samad

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo 

no photo 300Private Abdul Samad served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known November 16 1917- July 11, 1919.

 Story of Service

 

Abdul Samad was born in Kirkalen Calcutta India in May 1895. He came to the United States before 1917 and settled in New York City.

He began his U.S. Army service on November 16 1917 in New York City. Samad served with the 152 Depot Brigade until August, 16 1918. He then served with Company A of the 329 Colored Labor Service Battalion, Quartermaster until his discharge.

Samad served overseas from August 26, 1918 to June 23, 1919.

Read more: Private Abdul Samad

Everett Ray Seymour

Submitted by: George Besse, Commander of American Legion Post 78

Everett Seymour image

Everett Ray Seymour born around June 1, 1895. Everett Seymour served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Everett Ray Seymour was an apprentice carpenter when he became one of the first Ridgefield, Ct men to be drafted into the war, enlisting in October 1917.

After training at Camp Devens and Camp Merritt, he was shipped to France with Company L of the 165th Infantry from Connecticut.

In July of 1918, Private Seymour and his Company, then part of the 42nd Division, were involved in a battle near Fere-en-Tardenois northeast of Paris and west of Reims. They were working their way up a hill on a farm fighting a long morning cleaning up machine gun nest, and near the summit young Seymour was brought down by a bullet the suddenly ended his brief, but honorable career serving his country. He was 23 years of age and described as "A bright young man of straightforward, clean-cut habits and a fine, manly fellow who was well liked.

In August of 1920 The American Legion Post Number 78 was named in his honor as he was the first Ridgefield resident to die in battle during WWI.

Today his grave is on Row 10 of Plot B at the Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, very near where he fell.

 

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