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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

Dozier Wren

Submitted by: Chelsy Proper {local museum director}

Dozier Wren image

Dozier Wren born around 1894. Dozier Wren served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Private Dozier Wren, of Berkeley County, South Carolina, died of wounds received in Europe on May 31, 1918. He was a private in the 28th Infantry, 1st Division.

 

 

Read more: Dozier Wren

Henry Thomas Litchfield

Submitted by: Chelsy Proper {local museum director}

Henry Litchfield image

Henry Thomas Litchfield born around 1892. Henry Litchfield served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Henry Thomas Litchfield was a private first class in the 118th Infantry. He was wounded in action and received a Purple Heart.

 

 

 

 

Clarence Orvin

Submitted by: Chelsy Proper {local museum director}

Clarence Orvin image

Clarence Orvin born around 1894. Clarence Orvin served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Orvin was a private in Company G of the 118th Infantry and 30th Division. He was killed in action in France on October 8, 1918.

 

 

 

 

Lewis W Varner

Submitted by: Chelsy Proper {local museum director}

Lewis Varner image

Lewis W Varner born around . Lewis Varner served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Lewis W. Varner enlisted in Charleston, SC on July 26, 1917. He was a private when killed in action on October 8, 1918.

 

 

 

 

Carl Wilson Adams

Submitted by: Michael Sepal {great nephew}

Carl  Adams image

Carl Wilson Adams born around 1898. Carl Adams served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1916 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My father, Charles James "Jim" Sepal, was born and grew up in Sheridan, Wyoming. He had an uncle on his mother's side, Carl Wilson Adams, who in 1916, served with Company D, 3rd Wyoming Infantry of the Wyoming National Guard in Sheridan, Wyoming.

Following the outbreak of war with Germany, on April 6, 1917, Carl W. Adams' Wyoming National Guard unit in Sheridan joined with other military units to form Battery E 148 Field Artillery (Bat. E 148 F. A.) that fought in France, and later occupied Germany, during and after World War I.

The 148th was the most combat-engaged unit with Wyoming Guard troops in World War I. After multiple relocations stateside to train in artillery tactics, the regiment, with its battalion of Wyoming men, sailed for France in January 1918. Today soldiers are flown overseas, but in the early 20th century, it was seaborne transport that got the troops to France and it was dangerous. The convoy the 148th was in lost one transport ship to an enemy submarine during the crossing, but it had no Wyoming soldiers on it.

Arriving in France in February, the 148th moved to an artillery training base to sharpen their skills on the big barrel, 155 mm howitzers they would use on German front lines. Families back home only knew where their loved ones were in France from mail soldiers sent home, as newspaper coverage was very limited. It was unlikely that Wyoming residents knew that their fellow community members went to the front lines near Chateau Thierry by the Marne River in July.

Read more: Carl Wilson Adams

Talmage Edward Dawson

Submitted by: Brian Paul Kaess {Maternal Grandson}

 

2021 No Photo Available imageTalmage Edward Dawson born around 1895. Talmage Dawson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

Pfc. Talmage Edward Dawson, b. abt Oct 9, 1894/95 in Topeka, Kansas, d. May 1 1974, Northbrook, IL.

Married many times. 1st marriage to Mabel Lillian Atchinson (1895-1983), divorced from Mabel on March 20 1924, 2nd marriage to Sadie Huseman, one daughter: Wanda Lou Dawson. Widower in 1935. 3rd & 4th marriage to Margaret Jane Swartz- one of these on Dec 11 1952 in Cook County, Illinois. This may have been their 2nd marriage. One Daughter: Marie Ellen Dawson.

Margaret Jane Swartz, says she married Talmage Dawson twice and divorced him twice. Talmage was a native of Kansas. Worked as a Typographer for the Pittsburg Kansan, a Kansas newspaper. He is also mentioned as a linotype operator in other sources. Jeanene M. Forshey jokingly says that Wanda Lou Dawson, her Mother, thought Talmage looked like the ‘Duke of Windsor.’

Registered for the Draft for WW1 in Crawford County, Kansas, on June 5 1917. He tried to gain an exemption from the Draft but failed because he married too late. Served in the U.S. Army in WW1 on the West Front in France. Enlisted in the U.S. Army in May 28 1918 and was Honorably discharged on Jun 8 1919.

Read more: Talmage Edward Dawson

Charles James "Jim" Sepal

Submitted by: Michael Sepal {son}

  image

Charles James "Jim" Sepal served in World War I with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

 

My father, Charles James "Jim" Sepal, was born and grew up in Sheridan, Wyoming. He had an uncle on his mother's side, Carl Wilson Adams, who in 1916, served with Company D, 3rd Wyoming Infantry of the Wyoming National Guard in Sheridan, Wyoming.

Following the outbreak of war with Germany, on April 6, 1917, Carl W. Adams' Wyoming National Guard unit in Sheridan joined with other military units to form Battery E 148 Field Artillery (Bat. E 148 F. A.) that fought in France, and later occupied Germany, during and after World War I.

The 148th was the most combat-engaged unit with Wyoming Guard troops in World War I. After multiple relocations stateside to train in artillery tactics, the regiment, with its battalion of Wyoming men, sailed for France in January 1918. Today soldiers are flown overseas, but in the early 20th century, it was seaborne transport that got the troops to France and it was dangerous. The convoy the 148th was in lost one transport ship to an enemy submarine during the crossing, but it had no Wyoming soldiers on it.

Arriving in France in February, the 148th moved to an artillery training base to sharpen their skills on the big barrel, 155 mm howitzers they would use on German front lines. Families back home only knew where their loved ones were in France from mail soldiers sent home, as newspaper coverage was very limited. It was unlikely that Wyoming residents knew that their fellow community members went to the front lines near Chateau Thierry by the Marne River in July.

Read more: Charles James "Jim" Sepal

Marcus Juul Hanson

Submitted by: Per G. Melberg {Distant relative}

Marcus Hanson image

Marcus Juul Hanson was born around 1890. Marcus Hanson served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Markus Juul Hansen / Marcus J Hanson (1890-1918)
Tombstone of Markus Juul Hansen (Hørby Cemetery, Denmark)
Memory of
Markus Juul Hansen
Born in Lunden 24 June 1890
Killed in France
9 November 1918

___
He died for his Country

Introduction

What journey in life led to a young man from a rural parish in Northern Jutland, Denmark dying on a battlefield in France, whilst serving in the U.S. Army? And this just a few days before the Armistice put an end to World War I. This is the story of Markus Juul Hansen.

Markus' childhood and youth in Denmark

Markus Juul Hansen was born on 24th June 1890 in "Lunden", a small farmhouse on Tranekær Mark in the northernmost part of the parish of Hørby, Northern Jutland, Denmark. He was the son of Hans Christian Hansen (1861-1934) and Mathilde Jensen (1855-1913), who had married in 1884 and had seven children together. Markus was the third sibling.

Markus was confirmed in Hørby Church in 1904, and still included in the census for Hørby Parish as being resident in "Lunden" in 1906. Being part of a large family living on a small farm, Markus soon had to make his own way of living, commencing as a worker on a larger farm in the neighboring Karup Parish.

Read more: Marcus Juul Hanson - IN APP

Charles Bellwood Bleasby

Submitted by: Robert DeSousa {Husband of granddaughter}

Charles Bellwood Beasby mug

Charles Bellwood Bleasby born around 1887, Charles Bleasby served in World War 1 with the U.S. Navy. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

 

 

Charles continued to serve in the Navy Reserve after the war, attaining the rank of Lieutenant Commander.

 

 

 

Read more: Charles Bellwood Bleasby

James Patrick Keely

Submitted by: Evelyn Hoffmann {first cousin twice removed|

James Keely image

James Patrick Keely born around April 3, 1892. James Keely served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

The front-page death announcement in the Brooklyn, New York, newspaper, the Chat, read, “Made the Supreme Sacrifice.”1 It was for Private James P. Keely, my grandmother’s cousin, and appeared the morning of his burial on Oct. 12, 1918. It misreported the young man’s age but stated he had contracted pneumonia at camp and “died as truly for his country as if he had met his death in battle.”

Suspecting a link to the influenza pandemic during World War 1, which Grandma never spoke about, I searched for records.
James Patrick Keely’s draft registration card, completed June 5, 1917, described him as age 25, tall, with blue-grey eyes and light brown hair, Caucasian, having no dependents, and not physically disabled. 2 He was residing in Brooklyn and employed as “undertaker assistant” at the Edward A. Ireland Mortuary, (a family business run by my grandmother’s brother-in-law.)

Pvt. Keely’s “WWI New York U.S. Army Card showed he enlisted April 27, 1918, and was first sent to Camp Upton in his home state. 3 There, he was exposed to all forms of infantry combat training and assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade, which processed incoming and outgoing soldiers. Less than one month later, however, on May 22, Pvt. Keely was transferred to Georgia’s Camp Greenleaf. A 1927 report of the Surgeon General’s Office of the U.S. Army described this camp as mainly for training medical officers at Fort Oglethorpe.4 News of his becoming a medical officer trainee would have been happily received as Grandma recalled word of him “writing home” and welcoming this opportunity.

Read more: James Patrick Keely

Eugene H Koester

Submitted by: Chelsy Proper l{ocal museum director}

2021 No Photo Available image

Eugene H Koester born around 1896. Eugene Koester served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

Koester was killed in action in France on November 9, 1918, just two days before the Armistice. His body was repatriated to the United States in November 1922 and was the last WWI overseas death to return to Charleston, South Carolina for burial.

 

 

Read more: Eugene H Koester

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