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Stories of Service

You can search for the name or unit and you will get a list of the stories that contain them.

Harry Ford Beatty

Submitted by: Robert Kolar {Cousin}

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Harry Ford Beatty born around 1894. Harry Beatty served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

About October 1st, 1918. Cpl. Beatty was out on a patrol in the Argonne Forest near hill 244 when he was wounded by a rifle bullet. He was shot through the hips, the bullet passing completely through his body. He was given 1st aid and later taken to the hospital where he died.

Harry's body did not come back to the states until 2 years later on September 11, 1920.

I recently visited the cemetery where Harry was buried and realized he did not have a headstone, and I worked with the VA and the local cemetery to get the appropriate military headstone.

 

Walter William Ratinski

Submitted by: Theresa Cobb, Research Volunteer, Polish American Congress

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Walter William Ratinski born around 1888. Walter Ratinski served in World War 1 with the United States Marine Corps. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Walter William Ratinski served in World War I With the United States Marine Corps. His tour of duty with the U. S. Marine Corps lasted from his enlistment on December 15, 1917 in Rochester, New York, to his death in the trenches of France on June 6, 1918.

Walter Ratinski was born in Rochester, Monroe County, New York on June 7, 1888. He was one of thirteen children of Anthony and Josephine Borowiecka Ratinski. His parents emigrated from Posen Province, a partition of Poland, specifically from the area around Wagrowicz and Margonin, probably in the late1870’s. They settled in the city of Rochester, New York, and from records available, baptized most of their children in either St. Michael’s or St. Stanislaus Kostka Parishes.

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Cyrus Ross Chamberlain

Submitted by: Patrick Mosites Employee at Minneapolis International Airport-airfield named in his honor Wold-Chamberlain Field

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Cyrus Ross Chamberlain born around 1889. Cyrus Chamberlain served in World War 1 with the Lafayette Escadrille. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

A native of Minneapolis, where his father was Chairman of the First and Security National Bank, Chamberlain joined the French Lafayette Flying Corps in June of 1917. He attended French school and was posted to Lafayette Escadrille Squad 98. Slightly older than his squadron mates, he was often more reckless than the rest.

During the German offensive in the spring of 1918, his squadron flew air superiority missions over the front lines and on 13 June, his group dove from 12,000 feet on some German aircraft. They had been lured into a trap and other German fighters attacked. Chamberlain was killed by machine gun fire from an enemy ship. He was posthumously awarded the Croix de Guerre.

Wold-Chamberlain Field - Minneapolis-St Paul International Airport was dedicated in his honor in 1923.

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Earnest Groves Wold

Submitted by: Pat Mosites, Employee at Minneapolis International Airport-airfield named in his honor Wold-Chamberlain Field

5aeb7f834f5a8 ernest g wold ca 1916

Earnest Groves Wold was born around 1897. Earnest Wold served in World War 1 with the Lafayette Escadrille. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service


Ernest Groves Wold, served as a reconnaissance pilot in France’s First Aero Squadron, the Lafayette Escadrille, during World War I. Wold’s exceptional coolness and accuracy of fire enabled him to crisscross enemy lines four times on August 1, 1918, photographing German positions and forcing down at least two of five attacking German aircraft.

After machine gun bullets riddled his arms and killed his observer-photographer, Wold piloted his disabled plane back to base, flying with his feet and knees. He died in the crash landing, but his photographs safely reached French forces.

Five years later when the primitive “Speedway Airport” in south Minneapolis was about to be expanded and used for commercial and passenger traffic, it was decided that the new name for the facility should be Wold-Chamberlain Twin City Airport in honor of two war heroes, Ernest Groves Wold and Cyrus Foss Chamberlain. He rests at Aisne-Marne American Cemetery in France.

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Reeder Miller

Submitted by: Andy A Miller {Grandson}

Reeder Miller

Reeder Miller born around 1891. Reeder Miller served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Reeder Miller entered service in Honesdale, Pennsylvania and traveled to Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina near Spartanburg. In September 1918, he deployed as the regimental sergeant major in the 4th Corps Field Artillery with the American Expeditionary Forces in France.

In late October, just as his unit was getting "into the thick of the fight", he was notified that he'd been selected to attend the field artillery officer training school at Saumur. He would spend the remainder of his time in France there.

When the Armistice was signed on November 11th, his class was kept in session and he graduated the school in January 1919. With the War over, and the need for officers and soldiers greatly reduced, his class was denied commission as artillery officers and were reverted to their previous rank prior to the officer training school. By the end of that month, he and his classmates were ordered home.

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Edward Babb Cutter

Submitted by: Aaron Bahe, American Legion Post

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Edward Babb Cutter born around 1887. Edward Cutter served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1906 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

On May 1, 1887 in Anoka, Minnesota, Edward Bab Cutter (Nicknamed 'Ned') was the youngest of three born to the family of Oscar and Mary Cutter. Completing his high school education and with his mother's permission, Ned joined Company B, 3rd Minnesota Volunteer Regiment on 22 June 1906. By 1909, his fellow comrades had elected Ned 2nd Lieutenant.

While majoring in Law at the University of Minnesota, Ned joined the Cadet Corps Program (forerunner to the ROTC) and was officially recognized as an officer in the U.S. Army National Guard. Upon completing his studied on 5 June 1911, he received promotion to 1st Lieutenant.

Following graduation, Ned briefly relocated to Thief River Falls where he worked on his elder brother's newspaper. Due to the distances involved, Ned considered resigning his commission but no record of it exists and it is believed his Commanding Officer, Major Arthur Caswell, found an alternative solution.

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Oran O. Sutton

Submitted by: Douglas Frye {Cousin}

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Oran O. Sutton born around 1897. Oran Sutton served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Oran O. Sutton was born on September 24, 1897 to Wilken B. Sutton and Amelia Lowe Sutton in Clay County, Indiana.

Per his tombstone in Eagle Point National Cemetery, Oregon, he served with Wagr Btry C 63 Arty CAC.

 

 

 

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A Tradition of Service Logo 75Sam Mazzara

Submitted by: Sam Mazzara {Grandson}

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Sam Mazzara was born around 1896. Sam Mazzara served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Sam Mazzara was born on March 6, 1896 in Monte San Guiliano Sicily. He immigrated to the United States in April of 1913 and lived in Detroit. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and inducted on Sept. 22, 1917 in Detroit. He was assigned to the 85th Infantry Division (the Custer Division), 339th Infantry Regiment Company H and took his basic training at Camp Custer in Battle Creek, MI.

After basic training, he was assigned as a cook. This regiment was destined to be known as the Polar Bears (as well as Detroit's Own) and fight in Russia in a little known piece of the United States World War I history.

On July 14, 1918, he left Camp Custer with his unit. They were ordered overseas for duty. He arrived at Camp Mills, Long Island on July 15th, 1918. From there, his unit departed for England on July 21, 1918 and arrived in Liverpool, England on Aug. 3, 1918. They thought they were going to fight in Europe, however, once they reached England, they were told they were going to Russia at the request of the British government.

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John Joseph Quinn, Jr.

Submitted by: Dave Quinn {Grandson}

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John Joseph Quinn, Jr. was born on 09/21/1894. John Quinn served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Headquarters, 79th Division, Am. E. F. France. 8th May,. 1918
General Orders : No. 29:. E X T R A C T.

Par. 3 For gallantry in action and meritorious services, the following citations are published for the information of the command.

(On Sept. 27, 1918) Sergeant John J. Quinn, Medical Detatchment, 314th Infantry.

Sergeant Quinn remained alone in a dressing station near Montfaucon and gave first aid to all wounded men, and arranged for the evacuation of same, which was executed under heavy shell fire. Sergeant Quinn completed the task regardless of safety to himself. (Silver Star).


On September 29th, 1918, near Nantillois, he remained at a first aid station, while being shelled by German artillery, performing his duty under continual artillery fire until all patients had been given first aid and evacuated.

 

Charles Hollopeter

Submitted by: Allen Phetteplace, VFW post, and by Walter F. Johnson

5ada1123d8cf0 hollopeter face

Charles Hollopeter born around 1896. Charles Hollopeter served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Charles Hollopeter was born at Amsworth, Nebraska, Jan. 1, 1896. Son of Curtis and Josephine Hollopeter.

Enlisted at Stanley, Wis., on July 8, 1917, in Co. L 128th Inf. Sailed for France Feb. 20, 1918. Participated in all the battles of the 32nd Division. Promoted to the rank of corporal.

Was killed in action in the Meuse-Argonne, Nov. 7, 1918. (Burial at Riverside Cemetery, Ladysmith.)

 

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Willmar Albert Bathke

Submitted by: Allen Phetteplace, VFW post, and Walter F. Johnson

5ada102ff26f3 bathke face

Willmar Albert Bathke born around 1895, Willmar Bathke served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

Willmar Bathke- Born at Springfield, Minn., June 22, 1895. Son of Fred and Sean Bathke, of Tony.

Before entering the service, he was engaged in farm work, assisting his parents.

Entered the service July 5, 1918. Assigned to 109th Co. Engineers, 28th Division. Sailed for France Sept. 12, 1918. Participated in the battle of St. Mihiel. Was gassed at Thincourt, Nov. 2, 1918.

Suffered an attack of bronchial pneumonia which resulted in his death, Nov. 9, 1918. (Burial Riverside Cemetery, Ladysmith).

Read more: Willmar Albert Bathke

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