pilots in dress uniforms gas masks Mule Rearing African American Officers The pilots Riveters doughboys with mules African American Soldiers 1

Charles C. Peterson

Submitted by: Charles David Rawls {Grandson}

no photo 300

Charles C Peterson born around 1900. Charles Peterson served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1922.

Story of Service

 

Transcription: World War I Diaries of Pvt. Charles C. Peterson

Diary 1: black notebook, sewn binding
[inscription on front page]
Pvt Charles C. Peterson
Greenville
R #3 Alabama

[start of diary]

My Army Life
By Charles C. Peterson

On July 29th 1917 I intered the U.S.N.G. I was only a kid not old enough to belong to the Army, but I enlisted anyway in the 1st Ala. N.G. Co. D. from Fort Deposit Ala. Not knowing anything about the Army, I was put in a training camp at Camp Sheridan Montgomery, Ala. for 2 weeks training. After the 2 weeks training I was trained for a soldier and was then sent back to my company and was assigned to a squad of 7 pvts. And a corporal in charge. On Aug. 5 1917 the Ala. N.G. was mustered into the Federal service and about 75 men from Co. D. 1st Ala. N.G. was transferred to Co. D. of the 4th Ala. N.G. I happened to be one of the men in the 75 that were transferred. This made Co. D. 4th Ala. N.G. 250 war strength. The company was then divided into 4 Platoons. 1,2,3,4. Later the 4th Ala. N.G. was changed to the 167th Infantry and put in the 42nd Div. which was named the “Rainbow Division.”

On August 28th, 1917 the 167th Inf. Left Camp Sheridan Montgomery Ala. for Camp Albert L. Mills Hampstead, L.I. At this camp we received our overseas training. We landed in Camp Mills early on the morning of Sept. 12th, 1917. It was raining and we had to work in it putting up our tents in which were were to stay. We soon got them up and then got something to eat. We were all proud of our new camp. We rested a few days and then started drilling. 4 hrs. in the morning and about the same in the afternoon. This was very hard on us as we wasn’t used to so much of it. About 3 days later someone took the measles and we were put under quarantine. So we were compel to stay in camp after coming in from drill. We stayed in Camp Mills 2 mo. + 3 days. And about 2 mo. Of that time we were put under quarantine. It was at this Camp I was exposed to the Mumps and later had to go to the Hospital with them. I stayed in the Camp Hospital 3 weeks before I could get out to go back to my company. Just before leaving for France we received an “Overseas Examination” which all of us pass alright.

Early on Saturday morning Nov. 3rd 1917 we got up and rolled our packs and left camp Mills for New York City. There we were loaded on a “British Ship” named the S.S. Lapland. We left New York City the same day at 2:30 pm for Halifax, Canada. Where we were to wait for the rest of our convoy. We stayed in the harbor at Halifax for 3 days. Our convoy arrives and we start out for “Liverpool, England.” We were all sea sick for the first day out but we soon got alright and was enjoying our trip fine. We sailed on and about 2 days before landing in Liverpool. We received a bunch of sub-chasers. They were to guard us from there to Liverpool, but we were lucky enough not to run across any. We landed in Liverpool on Nov 19, 1917 but stayed on board until the next morning. We unloaded on the morning of Nov 20, 1917 and loaded on a British train for camp Morn Hill Winchester, England. On our way we stopped and a place called “Birmingham, England” and was served coffee and sandwitches by the people of Birmingham. We land in Winchester about 10:00 o’clock that night and hike out about 4 miles to Camp Morn Hill, which is up hill most all the way. We got something to eat at a “British Mess Hall” and then went to our barracks for a night rest. We stayed here about 4 days. Drilling 2 of them and then left for “South Hampton, England.” At South Hampton we load on a ship for France. We sailed about 7:00 o’clock that evening. We were delayed by a storm on the English Channel which we were crossing. It certainly was a bad one too for the Whole Crew of the boat gave it up except the Pilot and he stuck to his job and saved the ship. It only takes about 8 hrs to cross this Channel, but it took us about 28 hrs as we had to anchor until the storm was over. We landed one evening and got off the next morning. Our rifles and equipment was almost missed and some of the boys lost their equipment in the time of the storm.

The place we landed was La Harve, France. We hiked out to a rest camp that morning and got dinner and supper with the British Soldiers. Then we were assigned to a tent. 16 to one tent that about 6 could sleep in good. But we were lucky because we didn’t have to stay in these tents that night. That night we loaded on a French train for 3 days ride to a place called Uruffle, France. The trip was tiresome because we didn’t have any “Pullmans” to ride in so we didn’t get in sleep for the whole trip and about half enough to eat.

We get off at a town about 15 kilometers from Uruffle, France. Of course we had to hike it without any breakfast. We get into Uruffle about 11:00 o’clock and was assigned to Barracks, and getting something to eat about 5:00 o’clock that evening. Doing without breakfast and dinner and not so very much for supper. I was put on K.P. the next day, so I got plenty to eat for that day. It was awful muddy at this place and our garrison shoes couldn’t stand the hardships. So we were issued Field Shoes which was very uncomfortable. In about a week it began to snow and we had to get up at 4:30 and dress without any fire to stand a formation called Reville. We also had to drill in this kind of weather.

We stayed here about 2 weeks and then started out for 3 days hike in the snow. At the end of the 3rd day we landed in St. Blin France. At this place we spent Xmas 1917 and had to drill in any kind of weather that might be. We were poorly fed also. This did not suit me because we had always gotten plenty to eat while back in U.S. For Xmas we had a turkey dinner, but it was so cold we didn’t enjoy it much.

We started out again on a hike (Dec 26 1917) the day after Xmas for our training camp before going into the trenches. At the end of 2 days we reached our training camp at Marac, France. We got in about 5:00 o’clock that evening and go to bed without any supper and with cold feet. We get up the next morning and get breakfast. The mess sgt. Took the names as they got their breakfast so that no man could eat twice.
The ground was covered with snow and we were poorly feed. Only getting 2 meals a day. We rested for 2 or 3 days and then started drilling and training for the trenches. Later we had to dig small trenches to train in and then go out at night a take them over, getting back to our billets about 11:00 o’clock at night. We drilled in this manner about 2 mo. And then we got orders to go to the Front (Lorraine Front).

We rolled packs and hike to a town called “Rolansport France” which is about 8 kilo. From Marac. At this place we were loaded on French box cars and took a ride to the front. We loaded on about 1:00 o’clock and ride till the next morning at daylight. Then we got off and hike about 10 kilo. To a taown called “Brouville France.” We stayed here a few days and then hike up a little farther to the front to a town called “Gloville France” Here we were in reserve for the French up in the trenches. Later we were called on to relieve the French from the front. The company took over 2 strong points, G.C. 5 + G.C. 6. Our 2nd Platoon was at G.C. 5 and my Platoon (3rd Plt.) at G.C. 6. The other 2 platoon 1st + 4th were in support for us. At this time the 2nd Batallion of the 167th Inf. Was back in reserve at Glonville. My Batallion (1st Bn) was in the trenches for 10 days and then got relieved by the 2nd Bn. The 1st Batallion then moves back in reserve at Glonville.

During our 10 days in the trenches my Company (Co. D) captured 3 prisoners. The first captured without the aid of allies. The 2nd Bn. Stays in for 10 days and then gets relieved by the 3rd Bn. The 3rd Bn. Stays in 10 day and gets relieved by the French. This made a total of 30 days for the Regiment (167th Infantry).

We start back for a rest. We hiked about 20 kilo. From Glonville to the town we stopped in for rest. Here we get paid off and stay about a week and then was called back to the front. This time we go to another place on the Lorraine Front. GCR 13, 14, 15, and 16. My Plt. (3rd Plt) takes over the front of G.C. 15 located in the edge of a torn up town. The rest of the Co., 1st 2nd, and 4th Platoons, take over the other G.C.’s. We hold it for 8 days, and get relieved by the 2nd Bn. Then we go back to a town called “Vacaueville France.” The 2nd Bn. Stays in 8 days and then gets relieved by the 3rd Bn. This make each Bn. in the trenches 8 days and out 16 days. This worked fine as the Germans never gave us any trouble. We worked it in this manner for 110 days and then the 42nd Rainbow Div. got relieved by the 77th Div. from N.Y.

We go back to Vacaueville that night in the rain. The next afternoon about 7:30 o’clock we load on motor trucks (30 to the truck) and left Vacaueville for another place. We rode all that night and until the next morning at 7:00 o’clock. We unload at a town and stay for a couple of days. Then we hike over to a town about 10 kilo and we catch a train for the (Champagne Front).

We stop at a town and rest for 5 days, but we had to drill every day. One evening after coming in from drill we got orders to roll our pacs. We start out about 7:30 pm and hike all that night and until 8:00 o’clock the next morning. We stop in a town and stay until night get supper about 4:30 pm, the only meal we had gotten since the day before.
We start out again, but haven’t so far to go this time. We hiked to a camp called “Camp De Chalons” about 4 kilo. From a town called La Chappe. We stay here for about 3 days and get orders to go to the front. We start out and hike to a town called “Suippes, France” which is not far behind the lines. This was on July 4, 1918. July 14 1918 the German started their big drive at this point. We were put in support of the French up in the trenches. Our 2nd Bn. was sent up to help the French. We were among our artillery and they shelled us badly, but we had 40 ft. dugouts and was safe enough. Well we keep the Boche from breaking the lines and then we go back to La Cheppe. We stay here for dinner and supper. Were to leave that night but orders were changed so we pitched our tents and stayed until the next night. We hike out of La Cheppe about dark that night.

We hiked to a town about 10 kilo from La Chappe and stay the rest of the night. The next evening at 5:00 pm we start out for another hike to a town where we caught a train. We do not know where we are going, but we found out later that we were going to Chateau Thierry. We get off the train after about 48 hr ride and hike to a town about 20 kilo. away. Here we rested for 3 days and then get orders to go to the front. We load on motor trucks driven by (Chinks). We ride from 7:00 o’clock that evening till 8:00 o’clock the next morning. We get off and hike to a bunch of woods to rest for a while. We lay down on the ground and went to sleep.

In about 2 hours the first seargeant of my company woke us up to get ready to move. We were going to relieve the 28th Div. Who had been driving the Germans. We relieved them in the night of July 25 18. We got in holes dug by them so we would be safe from machine gun fire. Some of the boys got wounded before getting in their holes. We stay in these holes all night doing without supper and breakfast. The next day we get something to eat.

July 26-18 - 2:30 pm. We get orders to go over the top. Co. B. was in front and Co. D behind them. After advancing a little our boys began to fall 2 Lts. from my company was wounded and my Platoon Lt. + Sgt. Was killed in this battle (Ainse-Marne) and several more were killed also. We advance on until dark under heavy M.G. fire. Finally we got them on the run and they kept running, but we stop for the night and we spent most of the night in picking up the wounded. The next morning we met some of our boys we hadn’t seen since the battle thinking they had been killed.

We started out again that afternoon to advance to hill #212. On this advance we were shilled heavy. We stop out in a field and dig in for the night. The next morning we get breakfast and and continue our advance to 212 hill. We reach the foot of the hill about 11:00 am and dig in. We hold the front here for about 8 days and then thought we were getting relieved, but we only went back about 5 kilo to some woods.

We go back again to 212 hill and continue the advance for about 10 kilo farther and get relieved the same night by the 77th Div. Then we hike back about 15 kilo to some woods where we stayed for about 10 days. We get payed off and start out on a hike to a town called “Chateau Thierry.” We stopped on a hill for that night and pick up the hike the next day to a town about 4 kilo from the town of “La Ferte” (France).

In about 5 days we start out for La Ferte and caught a train for some place we did not know. We go in barracks at this place and rest for 2 days and then start drilling about 8 hrs a day. After staying here for 8 days we get orders to pack up and get ready to leave. We start out that night about dark not knowing where we were going, but we had an idea that we are going to another front. After 2 days hike we came near the “St. Mihiel” sector (Toul Front). We stop here in some woods and the next day the officers went up to look over their sectors. The next night we start up to the front.

We get up the front about 1:00 o’clock the next morning and are to start over the top at 5:00 am Sept 12 18. At this zero hour we start over the top. Our artillery had been thowing us a barrage all night. Our objective was 17 kilo and we had 3 days to make it in, but we made it in one day and 2 nights. We captured lots of prisoner and killed lots of them without loosing but a few men. I was llicky I only got a M.G. bullet in the knee of my pants not entering my knee. We reached our objective and dig in the 3rd Bn. Was in front and the 1st and 2nd in support. After 5 days we relieve the 3rd Bn. Along about this time I was put on K.P. back with our kitchen. We get relieved by 83rd Brigade (Ohio and NY) Reg’s.

In about 3 days the 83rd Brig. Gets relieved and we start out hiking. We hiked at night and rested in the day. Finally we came to the “Argonne Forests.” When we got under shell fire we were shelled heavy until we reached the forests. We stop a the foot of a big hill about 5 kilo from the front for 1 day and then hike up closer to another big hill. At this hill we stayed 3 days and then the 2nd Bn. starts on drive. The 1st B. was to help them if they didn’t succeed, but they made it all O.K. and we go up and relieve them. After holding the front for several days I was taken sick with the “Flu” on Oct 21 18 and was sent to the 168 F.H. Later I was sent to an evacuation hospital and from there to base 80 at “Beaune France.” In about a week I get well and start back to my outfit. I was sent to the replacement camp at “Clermont” and was at this place when the Armistice was signed Nov 11 18 5:40 A.M.

In 2 weeks I am off again to find my outfit. Myself and 2 Corp. from my co. were together. We were sent to the 5th Div. Causal Camp. Later we were attached to the 7th Inf. 5th Div. for food. One night we decided to run away so we did and hiked to a town where we found the 117th supply train (42nd Div.) They were leaving the next day for division ration dump so we stayed overnight and left with them. This was about 4 kilo from where the 167 Inf. was stationed. So we hiked over and found our outfit in a small town in “Luxemburg.” This was about 2 days before “thanksgiving day.” We spent Thanksgiving here and on the 1st day of Dec. 18 we started on a long hike to Germany. At the end of 9 days hike we stopped in a town called “Dries Germany” for a 4 day rest. After the rest we started again for a 3 days hike at the end of the 3rd day we landed in (Lohndorf Germany) Dec 16 18. At this place we expect to stay for 2 or 3 months.

We spent Xmas 1918 here and New Year Day 1919. Later we dug a pit for a rifle range to practice on. On Jan 17th we pulled of a stunt which was much like the sure thing of going over the top. A movie was taken of it. Only one accident occurred. A soldier was killed by a stoker-motor. On Feb 1919 some of us boys got a leave to take a trip up the Rhine River which was a nice trip.

On Feb 23 19 our Bn. adjutant died of the “Flu” and was buried at Neunarker Germany. We all regretted his death as he as a fine Lt. The U.S. Gov taken over a big theatre at Neunarda and put in a YMCA and we would get leave to visit the shows at it. Mar. 27-19 we had a little snow in Lohndorf. On Apr. 6 19 (Sunday) we started on our long trip to the US. We got on the train and rode for 80 hours to Brest, France (Landed Brest Apr. 10 19).

Early on Apr. 14 19 we got up and hiked down to get on the boat. We loaded on the USS North Carolina that day and sailed the next Apr 15 19 6:00 AM. Some of the boys got sick, but I never did. We had a few intertainments on board the ship and movies most every night. Early on Apr. 25th 19 we pulled in the harbor at Hoboken NJ and docked at 3:00 pm. We were served a lunch by the Salvation Army ladies.

We catch a train for Camp Merritt NJ a distance of about 18 miles. After getting to camp we were run though a delousing plant getting to bed about 2:00 o’clock. At this camp I decided to reenlist again. So I was discharged and reenlisted in the Coast Artiller Corps and received a 30 days furlough to visit home.

June 2 1919 I returned to Camp Merritt and reported to recruit Co. …. Bn.

June 10 I was transferred to 3# Prov. Co. and later trans to Motor transport Co. #408. I stayed here about 1 month and was put back in the 3# Prov. Co. My work as a job in a delousing plant for the soldiers coming back from overseas. After all the troops had landed back, we were given another job moving and beginning to tear up the camp.
Oct 12 19 I got a furlough to go home. This was Sunday and I got home Wednesday night about 12 o’clock. I stayed in town the rest of the night and went out home the next morning even early enough for breakfast. My father works in town. So I went back to see him. The next day I visit Georgiana Ala. about 16 miles south of Greenville. I went back that afternoon and spend the night a home. The next day (Sat) I go again and return home Sun. afternoon. Monday morning I go to the (Court house) to get marriage licence. Tuesday I go to Georgiana again and was married Oct 21 1919 at 3 P.M. The day after my wife and I went to Greenville. We enjoyed our visit very much only it was raining. We spent the night with my Father and Mother and returned next day to Georgiana. My mother came with us. She spent the night with us and returned back next day (Oct 24 19) on #6. I stayed in Georgiana until Jan 19 1921. Came to Greenville on that day.

Jan 22 20 I reported for duty at Recruiting office of Montgomery Ala. after being absent that long. They sent me out to a R.D. #3 and I was placed under confinement. Stayed under confinement from then until Apr 2 20. On that day I was given a summary court martial and released from the Guard House ona fine of $60.00. I stayed at this place until May 4 20 going home every week if possible. On May 4 20 I was transferred to the Coast Defense of Mobile at Fort Morgan Ala arriving there May 5 20 at 6:30 P.M. and reported for duty the next day and was assigned to 2nd Co. C.A.C. I worked around until May 14 20 when I was put on permanent guard duty doing 5 hours out of every 24 hours. Dances are given at this place every other Thursday night and a movie show every other night. On June 4 20 I got a pass and went home returning to Fort Morgan June 25th.

July 11th Pvt. Klingman + myself takes a hike up the beach AWOL. I get home 2 days following and return to Ft. Morgan with my wife July 22 1920. Was confined Aug 2nd and released Aug 18th. We began housekeeping the later paurt of Aug 1920 in a small house across the sea wall.

The list of countries I have been in:
1. United States - 1900-17
2. Canada - 1917-1917
3. Scotland - 1917-1917
4. England - 1917-1917
5. France - 1917-1918
6. Belgium - 1918-1918
7. Luxemborg - 1918-1918
8. Germany - 1918-1919
U.S. - 1919

List of states in U.S.
1. (Alabama) home
2. Georgia
3. South Carolina
4. N. Carolina
5. Virginia
6. Pennsylvania
7. Maryland
8. New York
9. New Jersey
10. Long Island (Prop of N.Y.)
11. Deleware

Katie Ethel Peterson was born the 23 of Dec. 1920 on Thurs.
Charlie Claire Peterson was born on the 20 of Dec 1922 on Wed.

Thurs.
1. active
2. greatly
3. questions
4. exchange
5. desire
6. consider
7. interest
8. entire
9. include
10. common
11. obey
12. group
13. relation
14. husband
15. respect
16. daughter
17. stronger
18. cousin
19. consist
20. union

Pvt. Charles C. Peterson
Aviation Repair Depot #3
Montgomery, Ala.

Pvt. Charles C. Peterson
2nd Co. C.A.C.
Fort Morgan, Ala.

Pvt. Charles C. Peterson
3# Prov. Co.
Camp Merritt N.J.
U.S.A

Pvt. Charles C. Peterson
Co. D. 167th U.S. Inf.
42nd Div. France
A.E.F.
Via New York

Pvt. Charles C. Peterson
Co. D. 1st Ala. N.G.
Montgomery
Ala.
Camp Sheridan

Diary 2: Black notebook, spiral binding

My Army Life

I left home on July 29th 1917 for Montgomery, Alabama to enlist in the Army. I was only 15 years of age, but feeling like I was a man and wanted to fight for my country. I enlisted in the 1st Ala. N.G. and was assigned to Company D. on July 29 1917.

Not knowing anything about the Army I was put in a training camp at Camp Sheridan Montgomery, Ala. for 2 weeks and then I was trained and assigned to a squad of 87 men and 1 corp in my Company. On Aug. 5th 1917 the Ala. N.G. was mustered into the regular service and a bunch of men from the 1st Ala. N.G. was transferred to the 4th Ala. N.G. Company D. of the 1st Ala. N.G. was sent to Co. D. of the 4th Ala. N.G. making the companys 250 strong. The company was divided into Platoons. 4 Platoons to a co. 1,2,3,4. I was assigned to the 3rd Platoon. Later the 4th Ala. N.G. was changed to the 167 U.S. Infantry, 42nd Div. We were treated very nice at this new organization.
On Aug 28 1917 the 167th Inf. left Camp Sheridan Montgomery Ala. for Camp Albert L. Mills Hampstead L.I. being on the train 2 days and nights and signing the Pay Roll the last day on board the train. We landed in Camp Albert L. Mills on Sept 1st it was training and we had to work in it putting up our tents. We soon got them up and we were all ready again in a new camp.

We rested a few days and then started drilling morning and evening something like 8 hours a day which was very hard drilling too.

In a day or two some one took the measles and we we put under quarantine so we were compel to stay in camp after coming in from drill. We stayed in Camp Mills 2 months and 3 days and during that time we were under quarantine except the last 3 days. Some of the boys got passes to go to New York, but I was always unlucky to get one. About a week before leaving for France we were examined for oversea service. I don’t see why they examined us for I think all of the boys pass the examination.

Early on Saturday morning Nov. 3rd 1917 we got up rolled packs and left camp for New York. There we were loaded on the S.S. Lapland the same day and sailed at 2:30 that evening for Halifax Canada. We landed there 2 days later and stayed there 3 days on board waiting for the rest of the convoy. There we received a pay day for October. The people of Halifax would come out to the board in gasoline lauches [?] with fruit and candies to sell us. I bought it by the box and sold it on board the ship.

Our convoy arrives and we start out for Liverpool England. We were all sea sick for the first day or two out, but we soon got over it and was enjoying our trip fine. We sailed on and about 2 days before landing in Liverpool a bunch of sub-marine destroyers met us to guard us from sub-marines. We landed in Liverpool on Nov 19th and unloaded on the 20th of Nov.

We were to unload on the 19th, but the board was crowded and we all couldn’t get off in the same day so we unloaded the following day. We unload and load on a British train for Camp Morn Hill, Winchester England a ride of about 18 hours. On the way we stopped at a place called Birmingham there we were served coffee by the women of that city.

We land in Winchester about 10:00 o’clock that night Nov. 20th 1917 and hike out about 4 miles to Camp Morn Hill. We got something to eat at the British Mess Hall and then went to bed in our barraks. We stayed here about 4 or 5 days drilling about 2 of them. Then we left for South Hampton England where we loaded on a boat for France. We got on the boat about 6:00 o’clock that evening and sailed about 7:00 o’clock. We were delayed by a storm on the English Channel. It certainly was a bad one too. Even the captain gave up the board, but the pilot stayed to his post and saved the ship. The trip can be made across the channel in 6 or 8 hours, but it took us about 18 hours on the account of the storm. We landed one evening and got off the next morning. Our rifles and equipment was almost ruined, but we were lucky to land safe ourselves. This place was La Harve France. We hiked out to a rest camp that morning and got dinner and supper with the British soldiers. Then we were assigned 16 to a tent that about 6 could sleep in good, but we were lucky because we didn’t have to stay there that night. We loaded on a French train for a 3 days ride to a place called Uruffe France. The ride sure was tiresome too because we didn’t have any sleep for the whole ride and about half enough to eat. Hard Tacks and corn beef. We get off at a town about 15 kilo. from the place we were to go to. Of course we had to hike it without any breakfast. We get into Uruffe about 10:30 o’clock. We were assigned to barracks and getting somehitng to eat about 5 o’clock that evening doing without breakfast and dinner and not so much for supper either. I was put on kitchen police the next day so I got plenty to eat. Here it was muddy and our Russetts shoes wasn’t suitable for it so we were issued hob nailed shoes which was very uncomfortable.

In about a week it began to snow and we had to get up about 4:30 without any fire and stand Revielle. We also had to drill in this kind of weather. We stayed here about 2 or three weeks and then started out for a 3 days hike in the snow. At the end of 3 days we ended up in St. Blin, France. At this place we spent Xmas 1917. We had to drill like we did in Uruffe only more of it and sometimes while it was snowing. We were poorly fed also and that did not suit us because we was always use to plenty to eat.

The boys didn’t like this much so that would miss all the drills they could. For Xmas we had a fairly good dinner of turkey and other good things but that was the last of it. We started out again for a hike on Dec 26 17 the day after Xmas for our training camp before going in the trenches. This place was Marac France. It took us 2 days to make the hike from St. Blin to Marac. We got into Marac about 4:30 one evening. Some of the boys just did hold out to make it in because the ground was covered with snow and they had bad shoes. We get in and go to bed with cold feed and without any supper. We get up the next morning and get breakfast. The mess sgt took the names as they got their breakfast so that no man could eat twice. The ground was covered with snow and we only got two meals a day. We rested for 2 or three days and then went to drilling and training for the front. Later we had to dig trenches to train in and then go out and take over the trenches at night getting back about 10:00 o’clock and night. We drilled in this manner about 2 months.

Orders came to go to the front (Lorraine Front). We roll packs and hike about 8 kilo. to a town called Rolanport France where we were loaded on French box cars and take a ride to the Front. We load on about 1:00 o’clock and ride till the next morning at daylight. We get off and hike about 10 kilo. to a town called Brouville. We stay here a few days and the hike a little farther up to the front to a town called Glonville, France. Here we we in reserve for the French up in trenches. Later we were called to relieve the French.

Towns passed on way to Brest: Metz - Vitryville - Le Mans -

All the non coms go up first to look over the front, and later the rest of the company goes up and takes over the front holding 2 strong points, G.C. 5 and G.C. 6. 2nd Plt. At G.C. 5 and 3rd Plt. At G.C. 6 the rest of the company 1st and 4th platoons in support. At this time the 2nd Bn. 167 Inf was back in reserve at Glonville. The 3rd Bn. back at Brouville. The 1st Bn. stayed in the front line for 10 days and then was relieved by the 2nd Bn. The 3rd Bn. then moves up to Glonville and the 1st moves back to Grouville.
The 2nd Bn. stays in for 10 days and gets relieved by the 3rd Bn. who stays in 10 days, making a total of 30 days for the 167 Inf. While the first Bn. was in company D. captured 3 prisoners being the first captured by U.S. troops without the aid of allies. At the end of 30 days the 167th gets relieved by the French and we start back for a rest. We hiked back to a town about 20 kilo. from Grouville. Here we stop for a rest and get paid off. We stay here for about a week and then was called back to the Front.

This time we go to a different place on the Lorraine Front G.C.’s 13, 14, 15, and 16. My Plt (3rd Plt) takes over the front at G.C. 15 the rest of the company taking the other G.C.’s. We hold it for 8 days and then got relieved by a Plt. From the 2nd Bn. Then we go back in reserve at a place called Vacqueville France. The 2nd Bn. stays in 8 days and then get relieved by the 3rd Bn. Then the 1st Bn. goes in again and stay for 8 day. This making each Bn. in the Trenches 8 days and out 16 days. This worked very fine as we didn’t have any trouble. We work this way for 1 hundred 10 days and then the 4nd Division got relieved by the 77th Division from New York. We go back to Vacqueville that night in the rain.

The next afternoon about 7:30 we loaded on motortrucks (about 30 in a truck) and left Vacqueville. We rode all that night and until 7:00 o’clock the next morning. We unload at a town I disremember the name where we stayed for a couple of days.

Then we hike over to a town about 10 kilo. where we catch a train for the Champagne Front. We unload at a town and rest for about 5 days but it wasn’t very much rest for we had to hike about 5 kilo. to drill every day and poorly fed also. After hiking in from drill on the fifth day we get orders to leave. We roll our packs and start out about 7:30 after drilling all day. We hike all that night until 8:00 o’clock the next day. Then we stop in a town and get a billet to rest until night. We go to bed and get up about 4:30 for supper. (The only meal we get that day). Then we roll our packs and start out again, but we don’t hike so far this night. We hiked to a camp (Camp De Chalons) about 4 kilo. from a town called La Cheppe. We stay here for 2 or 3 days and get orders to go to the front. We start out and hike to a town called Suippes which is not far behind the lines. We stay here that day and start to the front that night. The Germans are going to try to break the lines so we were put in support of the French who were in the front line. This was on July 4th 1918. On July 14th 1918 the Germans start their big appearance. Our 2nd Bn. was sent up in the front line to help the French out. This was the biggest offensive that had ever been known. We were back in support among the artillery and they shelled us badly, but we were in dug outs about 40 ft. deep and was safe from all danger. Well we keep the Boche from breaking the lines and then we go back one morning about 5:00 o’clock to La Cheppe. We stay here for dinner and supper (not getting any breakfast) and think we are leaving that night, but orders change and we stayed overnight until the next night about dark.

We hike out of La Cheppe about dark that night and hike to a town about 12 kilo. from La Cheppe. Here we stay for the remainder of the night and until the next evening about 5:00 o’clock. Then we start out for another hike to a town where we catch a French train. We ride on not knowing where we are at or where we are going, but we found out later that we were going to Chateau Thierry. We get off the train after about 48 hours ride and hike to a town about 20 kilo. away, here we rested for 2 or three days. Then we get orders to go to the front.

We load on motor truck driven by Chinks (who were very rough drivers) about 7:00 o’clock one night and ride all night and until about 8:00 o’clock the next morning. We get off and hike to a bunch of woods to sleep for a while. We get there and unroll our packs and make a place to sleep. In about 2 hrs. after we had gone to sleep I heard a whistle. It was the First Sgt. waking us up to move to the front. We get up and roll packs and start out again. We were going up to relieve the 28th Div. who had been driving the Germans back. We get up and relieve them about 7:00 o’clock July 25th, 1918. We get in holes dug by the troops we had relieved so we would be safe from machine guns. Some of our boys got shot before getting into their holes. We lay in our holes doing without supper and breakfast the next day. We get something to eat around 11:00 o’clock July 26, 1918. About 2:30 o’clock we get orders to go over the top. We start over. Company B. of our Reg. was in the front wave, and Company D. behind them. After advance a little piece our boys begin to fall. 2 Lieut’s from my company was wounded and my Platoon leader and Sgt. was killed. Also several more non-coms and privates were killed. We advance on until dark under heavy M.G. fire and then we fall back to a road about 300 yds back where we dig in for the night. I spent the most of the night carrying wounded from the battlefield to the dressing station.

The next morning we meet our friends which we hadn’t seen since the day before, thinking they were killed. We also gets something to eat and then start out walking over the battlefield hunting for souverniers. The Germans having retreated to 212 hill. We start out that afternoon about 1:00 o’clock to advance to 212 hill. On our advance we were shelled badly. We stopped out in a field about dark and dig in for the night. We get something to eat the next morning and continue our advance to 212 hill. We reach the foot of the hill about 11:00 o’clock that day, and did in.

The 165th Inf. was on our left trying to capture a town which they failed to hold it after gaining it twice, but the 3rd time they held it. We hold the front here for about a week and then think we are getting relieved, but we only went pack about 5 kilo. behind the front and spend the night and then go back to the front. We take 212 hill and continue the advance. We advance on about 10 kilo. in the rain, and reach our objective about dark. We get relieved that night by the 77th Div. and we hike back about 15 kilo. behind the front to some woods where we spend the night. We get something to eat the next morning about 9:00 o’clock. We stay here for about 10 days getting a pay day and then start out on a hike to the town of Chateau Thierry. We spend the night on a hill and pick up the hike the next day to a town about 48 kilo. from La Ferte. We stay here about 5 days and the go to La Ferte to catch a train for a town where we can rest for a while. We go in barracks out from town a little piece and rest for a day or two and then start drilling about 8 hrs. a day.

We stay here for about 10 days and start out one night about dark. We do not know where we are going, but we have and idea that we are going to another front. We hike on that night and stop in a town that morning about daylight. We start out again the next night and hike all night. We keep this up until we become near the Toul Front (St. Mihiel). We stop in some woods for the night. The officers going up to the front the next day to look [?] over their sectors. The next night we start up to the front to go over the top the next morning. We get up to the front about 1:00 o’clock that night after hiking through mud and water over our shoe tops. Sept 12 1918 about 5:00 o’clock we start over the top. D. Company in the lead. Our artillery was throwing us a nice barrage to advance behind. Our objective was 17 kilo. and we had 3 days to drive them back that far. We advanced on that day capturing lots of prisoners and only loosing a few men. I was lucky. I only got a bullet hole through the knee of my pants. We stop about 4:00 o’clock and dig in for the night.

We start out the next morning and reach our objective about noon Sept. 13 1918. The 3rd Bn. in the front and the 1st and 2nd in support. We did in and hold the front this way for about 5 days and then the 1st Bn. goes up and relives the 3rd Bn. The 1st Bn. holds the Front about 8 days and then we got relieved by the 83rd Brigade of the 42nd Div. Then we hike back that night to the rear. We stop in some woods about 12:00 o’clock and pitch tents for the night. We stay here about 3 days getting a pay day.

The 83rd Brigade gets relieved and we start out hiking again. We hike at night and rest in the day time until we come to another place on the front called the Argonne Forests. We stop about 8 or 10 kilo. behind the front for about 4 days and then start up to the front. We hike up to the front one night. We were shelled badly on the way, but we reached the front safely. We stop at the foot of a big hill about 5 kilo. behind the front. Here we stay for 1 day and then hike up closer to the front of the foot of another big hill.

Here we stay for 2 or 3 days and then the 2nd Bn. makes a drive on the Boche. If they didn’t succed in taking a hill the 1st Bn. was to go up and help them, but the took it all O.K. and we go up and relieve them after making the drive. We take over the front and hold it. After holding it for several day sin the rain and mud I took sick with the Influenza and go back to the Hospital. This was on Oct. 20, 1918. I am sent to Base Hospital 80 in the city of Boune France. I am well and on my way back to my outfit in 2 weeks. I am in the replacement camp at Clermont France when the armistice was signed. This was Nov-11-1918 at 5:40 A.M. After about 2 weeks in the replacement camp I was sent back to my outfit. Myself and 2 corp. from my company was together. We were sent to a 5th Div. Casual Camp. Later we were attached to the 5th Div. for food. One night we decide to run away and go back to our own Div., because we thought that we was going to be transferred to the 5th Div. We slip out one night about 7:00 o’clock and hike over to a town about 6 kilo from the 5th Div. Here we stay the rest of the night and start out the next morning to our outfit. We hike until dinner to a town where the 117th Supply Train (42nd Div.) was. This was about 50 kilo. form the Div and they was leaving the next day for the Div. We stay all night here and get on the trucks and rid to the Div. ration dump. This was about 4 kilo. form the 167 Inf. so we hiked over and found our outfit in a small town in Luxemburg. This was about 3 days before Thanksgiving Day 1918. The outfit had been here about 5 days. We spend Thanksgiving here and pull of parades.

On Dec 1st 1918 we leave this town on a long hike. We were starting to Germany. We hike for 9 day straight stopping on the 9th of Dec. in a town called Dries Germany. Here we stay until the 14th of Dec. Then we start out again on the morning of the 14th Dec. We hike for 3 days more. Landing in Lohndorf Germany on the evening of Dec. 16 1918. Here we expect to stay for a long time. We spend Xmas 1918 here. There wasn’t any calls on Xmas day. We got pork and other good things to eat. We have about 2 or 3 day off and we start drilling again.

We spend New Years Day at this place. Later we start digging a pit for a target range where we could practice shooting. We get it dug and we start practicing on it. On Jan 17th 1919 we pulled off a stunt which was something like sure enough war. It was advancing up a hill. Machine guns and stokes-motors were throwing the barrag and then they stopped and we took up the fire with rifles and auto-rifles. A moving picture was taken of it. There was only one accident. One man was killed.

On Feb. 19 1919 a bunch of us boys got a pass to go on an excursion boat on the Rhine River which was a very nice trip. We went about 35 kilo. down the river and then turned around and started back. We got back about dark.

On Feb 23 1919 our Battalion Ajutant 1st Lt. Melaski died of the Flu and was buried in Niuniarhr Germany on Feb 24th. We certainly did regret his death for he certainly was a good man.

On Mar 1st 1919 I got a pass to visit the city of Neumarhr Germany. At this place the YMCA has taken over a large theatre and shows from the Division are shown here also movies. The YMCA also puts out doughnuts and hot chocolate upon your arrival at the theatre, and at 11:30 they start feeding. Which is much better than what we get at the Company. A movie show is also shown at 10:30 AM each day and a show at 2:15 PM.

The distance from the town we stay in to Neunarder is about 6 kilometers, but we have trucks to take us there and they bring us back after the show is over after supper which is about 10:30 whien it is over. About 10 days later I got another pass to go over to the same place.

On Mar. 21st we got a pay day of which I got payed for two months (January + February) on Mar 27 we signed the pay roll for March.

Mar. 27th 1919 We had a little snow in Lohndorf.

On April 6 1919 (Sunday) we started on our long trip to the U.S.A. Box cars (45 men each) We got two meals a day on board the train being on about 80 hrs. On Apr. 10th we unloaded at Brest, France and hiked out to a camp about 4 kilo. from the town. Here we were billeted in squad tents. On Apr. 11th we got a pay day for the month of March. On Apr. 12th we had a pack inspection by the S.O.S. officers of the camp of which we passed O.K.

Early on Monday Morning Apr.-14-1919 we got up and rolled packs to go to the boat. We started about 6:00 a.m. and hiked to Brest (4 kilo.) We got to the Docks at Brest about 8:30 and loaded on a tug boat which taken us out to the U.S.S. North Carolina. We stayed on board all night and left the next morning a 6:30 a.m. for the U.S.A.
Apr. 15 1919 The first day out some of the boys got pretty sea sick, but that was soon over with.

On Apr. 21st 1919 at 2:30 P.M. we had on board a Boxing Bout and minstrel shows also movies most every night. Early on Apr. 25th 1919 (Friday) we pulled in the harbor at Hoboken N.J. WE anchored in the habor and docked at 3:00 P.M. We unloaded and was served a bunch by the Salvation Army. We get on a ferry boat and go up the Hudson River to another point in New Jersey and catch a train.

We ride about 18 miled to Camp Meritt New Jersey. The camp is about 1 mile from where we unloaded. We hike out and get in our Barracks. Then we get some supper. About 8:00 o’clock we was run through a delousing plant where we got our clothes sterilized and a bath. We get to bet about 2:00 o’clock that night. The next day we went to a big theatre and was given a lecture by governor --- and Col. Screws. A number of Alabamians was present whom had come to meet us but they arrived the day after we did. Colonel Screws’s wife was also present at the lecture.

[Poem, written on loose pages in back of diary]

I will tell you of my Army Life,
Which was greater than I thought.
Of course it was a long, long strife,
For it was the Hun we fought.
In November we sailed on a British ship
And landed in England you know
Then later went to France with
Then went to France with a ship
Where there is nothing but rain and snow
In France we learned to fight
And it sure was hard to do
But when we seen a Hun in sight
We gave him more than he could Chew.
Some were large and others small
And they were old and young
But we were answering our country’s call
And all the Huns got stung.
At last we conquered the Hun and returned to our native land
Back where we can see the sun
To give our Friend a hand.

 

Green Memorandum Notebook

“My Army Career”

By Charlie C. Peterson, U.S. Army

First Enlistment
7-29-17:
Enlisted at Camp Sheridan, Montgomery, Ala. and assigned to Col. “D,” 1st Inf., Ala. N.G.

8-5-17:
Transferred to Co. “D,” 4th Inf., Ala N.G., which was changed in a few days to Co. “D,” 167th U.S. Inf. and was part of the 84th Brigade, 42nd (Rainbow) Division.

8-28-17: Left Camp Sheridan… Camp Albert L. Mills, Long Island, N.Y.

8-30-17: Arrived at Camp Mills and put up camp in the rain.

8-30-17 to 11-3-17: Usual garrison duties preparing for overseas service, drilling morning and afternoon, about 10 hrs a day. I spent 3 weeks of this time in the Camp hospital with the Mumps.

11-3-17: Left Camp Mills for New York City and went aboard the British Ship (SS Lapland), sailing at 2:30 pm same day.

(Dates obscured) Halifax, N.S., Canada … here 3 days waiting for convoy to concentrate, then sailed for Liverpool, England

11-19-17: Arrived at Liverpool, England

11-20-17: Went ashore and boarded a train for Camp Morn Hill, Winchester, Eng. Passed thru Birmingham, Eng. And were served sandwiches and coffee. Arrived at Winchester about 10:00 pm same night, unloaded and hiked about 4 miles up hill to Camp Morn Hill. Very much upset the remainder of the night trying to get supper and … but finally got settled for the night and managed to get a couple of hours sleep. Stayed at Camp Morn Hill about 4 days, drilling, etc. then proceeded by rail to South Hampton, Eng. Where we boarded a small boat used to transport cattle across the English Channel. Sailed from South Hampton sometime during the early part of the night and about midnight encountered and awful bad storm. We almost shipwrecked … some of our personal equipment, and was sick as hell. After about 28 hours we arrived at La Harve, France, and boarded a train for “Somewhere.”

Riding for 3 days cramped up in a small compartment with scarcely enough to eat, we stopped, unloaded, and hiked about 10 or 12 miles to a small village called “Uruffe” France. Stayed here about 2 weeks, drilling and working in the snow, then hiked for 3 days over rocky muddy roads, spending each night in some Frenchman’s hay- (word obscured). At the end of the 3rd day we arrived at a place called “St. Blin,” France. Here we had Christmas, dinner (cold turkey), and drilled and worked in all sorts of weather.

12-26-17: Started on another hike for “Somewhere.”

12-28-17: Arrived at Marac, France. Here we received Trench warfare training under the supervision of French officers. We dug trenches for this purpose and would go out and have sham battles at night. After doing this for about 2 months we received orders to roll packs and proceed to Rolanport, France, about 7 miles away. Here we loaded no a train in box-cars (40 to a car) for a ride to the front. Unloaded the next morning at daybreak at a point behind the front. Here we could hear the Artillery in action and saw an enemy plane being shelled by anti-aircraft guns. Hiked about 10 miles to a place called Brouville, France. Stayed here a few days and then moved up in reserve for the French, who were in the front line trenches, to a town called Glomville, France. A few days later we moved up to the front and relieved the French, taking over 2 strong points, G.C.’s 5+6. Half of my company (2nd and 3rd platoons, 3rd being my platoon) held these points, while the 1st + 4th platoons supported us, the 2nd Battalion being in reserve for us at Glomville. After 10 days in the front line trenches, we got relieved by the 2nd Battalion and move back to Glomville in reserve. 2nd Battalion stayed in 10 days and got relieved by the 3rd. 3rd Battalion stayed in 10 days and got relieved by the French. This made a total of 30 days for the whole regiment at these point. After the regiment was relieved we hiked back about 15 or 20 miles to a town for a rest. A rumor got out that we were going back to the United States, but later proved to be untrue. Got paid here and at the end of a week we got called back to the front. This time my company took over G.C.’s 13, 14, 15 + 16 (Lorraine Sector), my platoon (3rd) taking over G.C. 15 located on the edge of a wrecked deserted village. After 8 days here we are relieved by the 2nd Bn. and move back to a town called Vacqueville, France. The 2nd Bn is relieved at the end of 8 days by the 3rd Bn., at the same time we move up in support for them. At the end of the next 8 days we relieved the 3rd Bn. and they moved back in reserve at Vacqueville. Working in this manner, we were in reserve 8 days, in support 8 days, and in the front line 8 days. This kept up for 110 days, being under shell-fire, or within range of enemy Artillery at all times. We got relieved by the 77th Div. N.A., and left the next morning by truck (40 to a truck) for some other place. Rode until the next morning and unloaded at a town where we stayed for a couple of days. Then we hiked to another town about 10 miles away and caught a train for the Champagne Front. Stopped at a town about 5 days to rest, but drilled every day. One afternoon after coming in from drill we got orders to roll packs and stand by. Started out about 7:30 P.M. and hiked all night and until 8:00 a.m. Stopped all day and started out again the next night. Hiked to a camp called “Camp De Chalons,” about 4 miles from a town by the name of “La Cheppe.” Stayed here about 3 days then got orders to go to the front.

7-4-18: Hiked to a town called “Suippes,” France, which was not far behind the lines.

7-14-18: Germany started a big drive at this point and we were put in support for the French who were already in the front line. The 2nd Bn. was sent up to help them. We were among our Artillery and got shelled badly, but the 40 foot dug-outs saved us. The Germans failed to accomplish their mission for they failed to break our lines. We got relieved after it was all over and hiked back to La Cheppe. Left La Cheppe about dark the following night, hiked to another town about 10 miles away and spent the remainder of the night. Left here the next afternoon about 5:00 pm and hiked to a town where we caught a train for “Somewhere.” After riding for about 48 hours, we stopped, unloaded, and hiked to a town about 15 or 20 miles away. Stayed here for 3 days, then got orders to proceed by truck to the front. The trucks were driven by Chinks. Started about 7:00 pm in the evening and rode until the next morning at 8:00 am. Got off and hiked to some woods to rest for a while. That afternoon we got orders to move up and relieve the 28th Division who were in the Chateau Thierry Sector.

7-25-18: Relieved the 28th Div. at night and lost several men before getting in to safety. We took cover in holes in some woods and spent the remainder of the night going without supper.

7-26-18: No breakfast, but had a little dinner. Started driving the enemy back about 2:30 PM. Advanced on until dark under heavy machine gun fire, our losses being heavy. Finally they began to retreat and we stopped for the night. Spent most of the night picking up the wounded and taking them to the dressing station. Got some breakfast the next morning and started out in the afternoon to advance to hill #212. During this advance we were shelled heavy. Stopped for the night in a wheat field and dug some holes to sleep in. Ate breakfast the next morning and continued our advance to hill #212. Reached the foot of the hill about 11:00 am and dug holes to get in. We held the lines here for about 8 days and then got relieved and moved back about 5 miles to some woods. The next afternoon we go back again and continued the advance about 10 miles beyond hill #212. Got relieved that night about 9:00 PM by the 77th Div. Hiked back about 12 miles to some woods where we stayed about 10 days. We got paid here and hiked to Chateau Thierry. Stopped on a hill that night and continued on the next day stopping about 4 miles from the town of “La Ferte,” France. Stayed here about 5 days, hiked to La Ferte, and caught a train for another place. We go in barracks at this place and rest about 2 days, then start drilling 8 hours a day. Done this for about 8 days. Then we got orders to pack up and move out. Left one night about dark not knowing where we were going, but had an idea we were going back to the front. After 2 days of hiking we stopped in some woods near the St. Mihiel Sector. The officers went up to the front to look over their sectors. The next night we started up to the front arriving about 1:00 am the next morning.

9-12-18: Started over the top at 5:00 A.M. The Artillery had been putting over a barrage all night. Our objective was about 15 miles and we had 3 days to make it in. We made it in one day and two nights. Killed and captured quite a few of the enemy on this drive, losing but a few of our own men. A bullet went thru the knee of my pants not touching the knee.

A few days after reaching our objective we were relieved by the 83rd Brigade (165th + 166th Inf.) In about 3 days they got relieved and we all start out hiking. Hiked at night and rested in the day. Finally we came to the “Argonne Forests.” Stopped at the foot of a big hill for a day about 5 miles behind the lines. The next day we moved up closer to the front at the foot of another big hill and stayed about 3 days.

The 2nd Bn started a drive and after it was over we went up and relieved them. Here we held the front for several days.

10-21-18: Taken sick with the Flu and sent to the 168th Field Hospital. From there I was carried to an evacuation hospital and later to Base #80 at “Beaune, France.” In about 10 days I was considered cured and was discharged from the hospital to return to my outfit. I was sent to a replacement camp at “Clermont, France,” and was at this place when the Armistice was signed and hostilities ceased, 11-11-18 - 5:40 AM. In about 2 weeks, 2 corporals and myself were sent to the 5th Division Casual Camp and was later attached to the 7th Inf. 5th Div. for rations and quarters. They were following up our outfit.

We decided to leave one night and try to find our company. Hiked to a town where we found the 117th Supply Train (42nd Div.), who were leaving by truck, the next day for the Division Ration Dump. We stayed overnight and went with them.

Upon arriving at the Dump, we found out that our outfit was about (number obscured) miles from there. So we hiked over and found them. This was in “Luxenburg.” Spent Thanksgiving here and on Dec. 1, 1918, started on a hike to Germany. At the end of 9 days we arrived at a placed called “Dries, Germany.” Stayed here 4 days and started out again. Arrived in Lohndorf, Germany Dec 16, 1918. Spent Christmas, 1918 + New Year’s Day, 1918 here. This was near the Rhine River, and we often got passes to take boat rides up the river. The Government took over a large theater in Neunarhr, Germany near Lohndorf, and put in a Y.M.C.A. We were granted passes to visit this place and see the shows.

On April 6, 1918 (Sun.) we left Londorf for Brest, France. After riding for about 80 hours, we arrived in Brest. Apr. 10, 1919 Here we were paid off and got ready for the journey back to the U.S. Early on Apr. 14, 1919, we got up and hiked down to get on a boat. We boarded the “USS North Carolina” that day and sailed the next day (Apr. 15, 1919), at 6:00 a.m. Had a few entertainments on board the ship and movies most every night. Docked in New York at 3:00 p.m. April 25, 1919 (Friday). We unloaded and caught a train for Camp Merritt, N.J. Here we were put thru a delousing plant and given some new cloths. Discharged at Camp Merritt, N.J. May 2, 1919.

Second Enlistment

Reenlisted at Camp Merritt, N.J. May 3, 1919, for 3 years, Coast Artillery Corps, unassigned. Granted a 30 day furlough May 3, 1919, and left Camp Merritt the same day for Greenville Ala. to visit my mother + father. Arrived in Greenville 2 days later. Also visited my brother in Birmingham, Ala. for a few days. Reported back for duty June 2, 1919, and assigned to the Recruit Company, Casual (word obscured) at Camp Merritt.

June 10, 1919. I was trfd [?] to the 3rd Prov. Co., same station, and started working in the Camp delousing Plant. Worked at this for a while and then started tearing down the camp and doing other odd jobs around the Post.

Oct 12, 1919 (Sun) I left Camp Merritt, AWOL. Arrived in Greenville Oct 15th (Wed). Went to Georgiana, Ala. Fri. Oct 17th and again Saturday 18, returning Sunday 19th. Married Miss Ethel Rogers Tuesday, Oct 21, 1919 at Georgiana, Ala.

Went to Grenville the next day (10-22-19) and returned to Georgiana the following day (10-23-19). Left Georgiana Jan 19, 1920 and went to Greenville. Turned myself in to the Recruiting Office in Motg’ on Jan 22/20 and was sent out to ARD #3 (now Maxwell Field) and placed in the conf. Tried by Summary Courtmartial Apr 2/20 and got a $60.00 fine and released from Conf.

Transferred to Coast Defenses of Mobile, Fort Morgan, Ala. May 4, 1920. Arrived at Fort Morgan May 5/20, 6:00 PM. Reported for duty the next day and assigned to 2nd Co. C.A.C., C.D. of Mobile. Went AWOL June 4/20. Returned June 25/20 and put on K.P. for about 10 or 15 days. AWOL again July 11/20 Returned July 22/20 bringing my wife with me. Confined Aug 2/20 and released Aug 18/20.

About Family Ties Button

Stories of Service Button 250

 

submitservice revise

Documenting Doughboys 260

donateartifact revise

RollofHonorSideButton

genealogicalresources revise

Navy Log Button 250

"Pershing" Donors

Founding Sponsor
PritzkerMML Logo


Starr Foundation Logo