African American Soldiers 1 Mule Rearing pilots in dress uniforms African American Officers gas masks doughboys with mules The pilots Riveters

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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June 19, 2018

The Father of Father’s Day: American Celebration of Fatherhood During WWI

Stars and Stripes

Have you ever wondered about the history of Father’s Day? There was no federally recognized Father’s Day in America during the time of World War I. It was not until 1972, when President Richard Nixon signed a proclamation that the third Sunday in June was to be designated as the official holiday. During World War I, however, various communities in 1917-1918 did celebrate a day dedicated to fathers. WW1CC Intern Joseph Vesper explores how today's salute to America's dad's got its start in WWI, including the push led by The Stars and Stripes newspaper.


"I knew I wanted to dig deeper into this decades-long relationship."

Jenifer Burckett-Picker

Jenifer Burckett-Picker was going through a small trunk that was “cluttering the basement area” that her husband wanted to use for his hobbies, and found a treasure trove: her dad’s WWI memorabilia. In it was the revolver (with no bullets in the barrel), WWI victory medals attesting to her dad’s participation in both the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne Offensives, old maps of the Western Front in the area of Verdun, the khaki army hat and shirt, her dad’s Army discharge papers, and a small, partially disintegrated, brittle envelope with something inside. What she found inside that old envelope led her to travel to France twice, and to write a book: Dad and Dunk in the Great WarRead how her offhand discovery changed Jenifer's life, and quite literally put her into her dad's WWI footsteps.


PBS/American Experience re-airing The Great War documentary series this week

The Great War

Great news for the World War I community. The ground-breaking documentary series, THE GREAT WAR, will re-air on PBS stations across the country, with the first episode airing today, April 19.

Here is the replay schedule:

  • Episode 1 will air on June 19 at 9/8c
  • Episode 2 on June 26 at 9/8c, and
  • Episode 3 on July 3 at 9/8c.

All three episodes will be available for free streaming starting June 19 at 9 pm EST through July 30. Read more about the replay of this epic WWI documentary series this week.


Educational Poster Series Tells Story of DHS Agencies' Service in World War I

DHS

Even though the U.S. Department of Homeland Security wasn't established until 2002, the department has some real connection to World War I. As part of the ongoing commemoration of the World War I Centennial, the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library has initiated a collaborative Department of Homeland Security project to create an educational poster series, illustrating the roles of DHS’s legacy agencies during WWI. The five free posters in the series aim to raise awareness about the significant history and heritage of DHS while honoring the nation’s participation in WWI. Find out more about these great educational posters, and download your own copies.


Honoring “Detroit’s Own”: Polar Bear Memorial Association’s World War I Centennial Commemoration

339th Infantry Leaves for Russia

Polar bears are known for their ability to survive and thrive in the most adverse conditions, all while being regarded as the tundra's most fierce predator. In a similar fashion, the American North Russia Expeditionary Forces (ANREF) in Russia were revered for being as resilient as polar bears. The men of the ANREF fought the newly formed Red Army while simultaneously battling the Russian winter’s sub-zero temperatures. These men and their stories have nearly been forgotten, but because of the incredible work of the Polar Bear Memorial Association, Americans are beginning to learn more about The United States’ intervention into the Russian Civil War. WW1CC Intern Will Kaiser spoke to Mike Grobbel, President of the Polar Bear Memorial Association, about the WWI Polar Bear Expedition, about his commemoration organization, and about their activities.


WWI and WWII Tourism Marketing Grants are open again -- Up to $10,000 available

Virginia Commission

Virginia World War I and World War II Tourism Marketing Program Applications are now open! Deadline is Tuesday, August 7, 2018 by 5:00 PM. The Virginia Tourism Corporation (VTC) and the World War I and World War II Commemoration Commission (the Commission) announce that applications are now available for the Virginia World War I and World War II Tourism Marketing Program grants.The grants are intended to help facilitate programs and events that will honor WWI and WWII veterans not only from Virginia, but across the country. Read more about this WWI centennial commemoration grant opportunity here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Looking over to Belleau Wood

Episode #76
Highlights: The Battle of Belleau Wood

The Battle of Belleau Wood - Mike Shuster | @02:15

June 11 Breakthrough at Belleau Wood - Dr. Edward Lengel | @06:00

The birth of the modern US Marine Corps - Alan Axelrod | @10:05

War in The sky: The Ace who ran Pan Am | @16:45

Historian Corner: The Dept. of State in WWI - Thomas Faith | @18:25

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: San Francisco - Ken Maley | @25:55

Speaking WWI: Boot Camp | @32:00

WWI War Tech: Submarine | @34:00

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Highlights | @37:50

Social Media - Katherine Akey | @43:50


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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The Roots of Contemporary War Literature in James Joyce’s Ulysses

What do contemporary war writers discuss when they talk about WWI? James Joyce's epic work, Ulysses,of course. This week on WWrite, Afghanistan veteran, Peter Molin, lets us listen in on a conversation among some of the most important voices in war writing today. Not to miss!


Doughboy MIA for week of June 18

Doughboy Grave Silhouette

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Pvt. Frederick Bullers, born in What Cheer, Iowa in March, 1894 and enlisted at Jarbridge, Nevada on 7 September 1917. He trained as part of the 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. Thereafter he was then transferred to the 164th infantry, 41st Division with whom he went to France in December, 1917. In France the 41st Division was used a replacement pool and Private Bullers was sent to Company D, 26th Infantry, 1st Division. He saw considerable action with the 26th throughout all of 1918, including that famous first fight at Cantigny and the St. Mihiel Offensive. Going into combat with them again on 1 October 1918, this time into the Meuse-Argonne to replace the wrecked 35th Division, Private Bullers was Killed in Action two days later in the heavy fighting northeast of the little town of Apremont. The army was unable to locate any relatives of his save for one brother, Charles. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help solve the case of Private Bullers? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandis

Hat

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA hat. The poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. The Navy hat with white Doughboy embroidery is a 100% cotton, structured with contrasting pancake visor, sweatband and taping, and pre-curved bill. The velcro closure features U.S. flag emblem. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. Order your Doughboy Commemorative hat here.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  Proceeds from the Official WWI Centennial Merchandise help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.


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Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Douglas Mellen Burckett 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Douglas Mellen Burckett

 

Submitted by: Jenifer Burckett-Picker {daughter}

 

 

Douglas Mellen Burckett born around 1895, Douglas Burckett served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

My father, Douglas Mellen Burckett, was born in Brooklyn in 1895 and grew up in Montclair and Somerville, New Jersey. After finishing high school, plus a couple of years of military academy, he enrolled in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the fall of 1915 to study electrical engineering.

After his sophomore year, in the fall of 1917, he enlisted in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). He was in Wagon Company #3 of the 23rd Engineers Regiment and spent his first almost five months at various training camps in Maryland (Camp Meade, Camp Glen Burnie, and Camp Laurel). At Camp Meade, he met his lifelong friend, George W. Duncan “Dunk”, from Missoula, Montana.

Dad and Dunk shipped over from Hoboken, NJ to Brest France in early April 1918 on the U.S.S. George Washington. They spent just over a week in Brest at Camp Pontanezen, before entraining to Nevers in central France, where they spent the next almost four months working on the most important American railroad project in France in WWI – unheard of and forgotten today, but of vital strategic importance to the war effort – the Nevers Cut-Off (or as the French called it “La ligne americaine”).

Read Douglas Mellen Burckett's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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June 12, 2018

Amazing Collection of Digitized WWI Newspapers at Library of Congress 

Newspaper

There is an amazing new set of World War I newspapers that are now available digitally from the Library of Congress. This vast online collection of World War I era newspaper clippings is from a single unique source: the 400-volume, 80,000-page set, World War History: Daily Records and Comments as Appeared in American and Foreign Newspapers, 1914-1926. Beginning with the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 and extending to the November 11, 1918 armistice and years after, the clippings yield significant information about the political, social, cultural, and economic impact of the war as it is taking place and its aftermath. The clippings cover far beyond the valuable contemporary news reports and contain war-related editorials, features, cartoons, photos, maps, and more. Read more about this incredible collection, and how it survived a near-death experience to find a permanent home at the LOC.


2,641 "poppies" at National Museum of the Marine Corps honor  Marines killed in WWI

USMC Poppies

This week, the National Museum of the Marine Corps hosted a number of community activities in commemoration of the centennial of the Battle of Belleau Wood, during World War I. During the week, visitors to the museum "planted" 2,641 poppies in honor of all of the Marines killed during World War I. Each poppy includes the name of a Marine, his home of record, and the date and place of death. In addition, the Museum hosted a full day of WWI-themed educational activities. Read more about the Museum's World War I commemoration activities here.


"I wanted the reader to feel like they too were following their ancestor through the war."

Andrew Capets

Even though the Great War ended one hundred years ago, families across the country continue to uncover complex military pasts of their families. The World War One Centennial Commission is proud to endorse author Andrew Capets’ book, Good War, Great Men, which was inspired by his grandfather’s exploits in the 313th Machine Gun Battalion in France. Using the harrowing accounts from letters and diary entries of the 313th Battalion, Mr. Capets’ book immerses readers in the trenches with the men of the 313th. In a recent interview with the author, WW1CC intern Will Kasier had the chance to ask Mr. Capets for more details about his newly released book.


Los Altos History Museum features exhibition on local families during WWI

Los Altos

The Los Altos History Museum highlights material seldom on display in its latest exhibition, “Right Here: Our Local Stories,” which runs through July 1. The display focuses on World War I artifacts and stories of local families affected by the war. The exhibition features personal letters, original newspaper stories and posters promoting patriotic messages that mobilized the nation to war. In conjunction with the exhibition, a panel discussion – “World War I: Lessons Learned?” – is scheduled 2-4 p.m. June 17 at the museum, featuring, among others, Kim Cranston discussing the interest of his father, the late U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston, in the political aftermath of WWI. Read more about this California WWI commemoration event here.


"I realized the story of the retreat was a book I must to write"

Nancy Cramer

Nancy Cramer, author and long-time volunteer at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, is publishing her 5th book on WWI, "Retreat to Victory," about the Serbian army retreating and not surrendering in WWI. It is a story unknown to most Americans, but noteworthy for its heroism, courage, determination, and hardships. Many Serbs died in their efforts to reach safety, with only about half of them surviving. They recuperated, and went to northern Greece, and alongside the Brits and French, defeated the Bulgarians who surrendered in October, 1918. Nancy writes about how the book came to be written and published; read the story here.


The Necessity of Intervention: A Foreign Policy Analysis of the U.S. and WWI

President Wilson

Kyle Amonson writes in Small Wars Journal that "Foreign policy often implores the inquiry, is war necessary to solve foreign policy challenges? It is not; however, the capability to wage, and win, conflict is necessary. War is often the insurance plan in the periphery of successful foreign policy, ready to be called upon when foreign policy no longer suits national interests or effectively ensures security. Prosperity and principles are essential, but security is the ultimate objective of foreign policy, and nations achieve security and peace through power." Read Amonson's entire essay examining the U.S. transition from unilateral policy and neutrality, to involvement in WWI as a case study on war as a tool of foreign policy here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Interior of a WWI era German U-Boat

Episode #75
Highlights: War Comes to U.S. Shore! 

100 Years Ago This Week: German U-boats on the Eastern seaboard | @01:30

War In The Sky: First American Ace | @07:30

A million men in France - Mike Shuster | @`12:30

Machine gunners at Chateau Thierry - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:45

Commission Armistice Centennial Plans - Meredith Carr | @21:10

CBS News Radio at Pershing Park - Chas Henry | @27:15

WWI at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum - Dr. Peter Jakab | @29:50

New Mexico in WWI - Jeff Laudermilk | @36:10

100C /100M: Hawaii’s Memorial Natatorium - Donna Ching | @43:00

Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:25


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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PTSD

WWI helped psychoanalyst, Sigmund Freud, revolutionize his understanding of dreams. By analyzing the dreams of WWI combat veterans, he gained insight about what happens to the unconscious, invisible wounds of war during sleep. This week, through the work of literary theorist, Cathy Caruth, WWrite looks at WWI's early investigations into what we call today, PTSD


Doughboy MIA for week of June 11

Leonard Aitkens

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is is 1st LT Leonard Charles Aitken.  Born in Reno, Nevada on 10 June 1897, Leonard Aitken grew up in Califonia, where he joined the California National Guard at 18 years of age. When the trouble broke out with Mexico, he reported for duty in June, 1916 and served along the border with the hospital corps, attending elements of what would, a year later, become the 160th Infantry, 40th Division. Following America’s declaration of war on Germany, on 7 April 1917, Aitken reported to the Officers Training School at San Diego and upon graduation shipped to France in August, 1918 as a 2nd lieutenant with the 158th Infantry, 40th Division. There, on 20 October 1918, he was sent as a replacement officer to the 372nd Infantry, 93rd Division, then holding a section of the line in the Alsace sector near Hill 607. On 7 November, while leading a squad of men on a night patrol, they captured several prisoners but unknowingly walked into the line of fire of a German machine gun nest, which opened up on them, killing or capturing all but two enlisted men of the patrol and freeing the prisoners. Without hesitation Lieutenant Aitken immediately advanced against the position with the intent of eliminating it, but he was shot twice in the chest and killed in the endeavor. His date of death is given as 8 November 1918. Following the Armistice, it was learned that German officers had seen that Aitkens was buried with full military honors in the church yard of the tiny hamlet of La Paive, some 40 miles east of Epinal, France. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help solve Lt. Aitken’s case? Why not Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Honoring the Doughboys: Following My Grandfather's World War I Diary 300

The Great War may have ended 100 years ago, but the ways in which it influences and affects the generations today are diverse and fascinating. Upon receiving the diary of his grandfather, a World War I veteran, writer and photographer Jeffrey Lowdermilk was inspired to honor the memory of George A. Carlson by traversing the same journey he took across Europe, reliving the experiences by visiting the towns, battlefields, and landscapes described in the diary. He has since published a book, Honoring The Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s WWI Diary, describing his journey,  with contemporary photographs of the places he visited as well as diary excerpts. In addition, Mr. Lowdermilk has donated several copies of Honoring the Doughboys to be sold as Official Centennial Merchandise to benefit the Centennial Commission’s Memorial Fund.  Order your own very special copy of this landmark book now for $49.00, and help build the national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Kenneth M. Meadows

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Kenneth M. Meadows

 

Submitted by: Benjamin Woodard

Kenneth M. Meadows born around 1891, Kenneth Meadows served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service 

Kenneth M. Meadows was born Jan 21, 1891, at Upper Green Bottom, West Virginia, to F.M. and Cora Meadows. 

He lived in Huntington, West Virginia, and worked with his brother, Azel, in the real estate business. His wife was Blanche C. Meadows. 

He enlisted on Jun 15, 1918, and was sent to the automobile mechanic school at Morgantown, West Virginia. He trained their two months and graduated with a card proving that he was the fastest driver of the 75 mechanics in training.

Read Kenneth M. Meadows's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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June 5, 2018

North Carolina and Ohio highway gardens honor World War I Centennial

Poppies OH NC

On Memorial Day Weekend in Columbus, the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) unveiled its World War I Red Poppy Remembrance Garden at the Interstate 70 eastbound rest area in Madison County, in honor of the Centennial of WWI. The Ohio garden joins  the award-winning wildflowers blooming along North Carolina’s highways to commemorate WWI veterans. This past year, the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) Wildflower Program planted 240 acres of poppies in remembrance of those who gave their lives during World War One. Read more about the ODOT and NDOT poppy plantings here. 

Want to plant poppies yourself to honor those Americans who served in WWI? Check out the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission's Poppy Program here.


New Commemorative Pathway in Corcieux, France to Honor Lafayette Escadrille Airmen

 

Christian Cael

A new commemorative path, with a series of informational panels, is being constructed to tell the story of the Lafayette Escadrille, of American aviator Norman Price, and of the American Expeditionary Forces aviation activities at the Corcieux aviation field nearby. The panels will summarize the American activity at that former airfield from 1915 to 1919. Read more about how Christian Cael (right), the mayor of this small French town, is making this tremendous transatlantic tribute happen here.


An army marches on its stomach, but a rolling kitchen helps keep it filled

Alan Crane

Imagine that you are a Doughboy and have just finished a 20 mile march in the rain. You feel frozen, tired, and hungry. Thank goodness your company’s rolling field kitchen accompanied you on this long trek and tonight you will be well fed with a warm meal. The rolling kitchens of World War One were capable of feeding over 200 men at a time. The inspiration behind them was to have a fast warm meal ready to fuel the immense amount of calories burned per day while simultaneously boosting morale amongst the troops. In Norwich, Connecticut, Alan Crane (left), a WWI history enthusiast, reenactor, and manager of the 26th Yankee Division WW1 Living History Group, has created the iconic and well welcomed sight for many a hungry modern-day Doughboy. We had the opportunity to ask Alan a few questions about his recently constructed World War I rolling kitchen.


National WWI Museum seeks partners to display names of 1918 war casualties

Jonathan R. Casey

The National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, MO is inviting organizations across the United States to take part in a national - and international - commemoration and education project. For the first time the names of the WWI dead from the United States and other combatant nations will be witnessed one by one: American, Canadian, British, French, German, Belgian, Italian, Turkish, Australian, Slovenian, New Zealand, the British Indian Army and the Chinese Labour Corps. Each name is displayed in the 100th year after death. Each name is programmed to appear on an exact day, hour and minute allowing viewers to find at www.theworldremembers.org the moment that any name will appear. Jonathan Casey of the Museum (right) has more about how communities and organizations can help link Americans to their nation’s history as well as to the history of other nations with this nationwide project.


Heartland Men’s Chorus Presents WWI-themed Events in Kansas City

Music

The Heartland Men’s Chorus joins forces with the National World War I Memorial and Museum for their summer concert "Indivisible" in which the world premiere of "We, The Unknown", will occur on June 9th at 8pm and June 10th at 4pm at the C. Stephen Metzler Hall of the Folly Theater, downtown Kansas City, MO. They will be joined by the U.S. Army Soldiers' Chorus. This project is an official Commemorative Partner of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission. On June 6, 2018, at 6:30pm,  composer Timothy C. Takach, co-librettists Pat Daneman and Rob Hill, and historian Dr. Jason Crouthamel, will participate in a discussion at the Museum of the creative process behind  "We, The Unknown." Read more about these two commemorative events in Kansas City here.


"Not to include World War I with the memorials to other 20th century wars in Washington would be wrong."

Carillon Richmond, VA

Writing on the Richmond Times-Dispatch newspaper's richmond.com web site, columnist Marsha Mercer writes emphatically about what she sees as "A Capital disgrace": "When you’re in Washington, you can visit memorials to veterans of Vietnam, Korea, and World War II — but you won’t find one for the veterans of World War I." Noting that "almost every city and county in Virginia has a memorial to the local men and women who served in the First World War," she points out the 240-foot tall Carillon in Richmond’s Byrd Park (right), the State of Virginia’s "memorial to the 3,700 Virginians who died in or because of World War I." Says Mercer: "Washington once again could learn from the people in cities and towns around the country, who gathered together to honor their World War I dead."   Read Mercer's entire thoughtful editorial here.


Conscientious Objectors and Draft Registration: A Timely Lesson from WWI

conscientious objectors

Cynthia Wachtell writes on the Tikkun Magazine web site that "One hundred years ago my paternal grandfather, Benjamin Wachtell, was conscripted into the United States Army during World War I. He was a conscientious objector, but there had been no way for him to signal this on his required draft registration card. So, when he faced his draft board, he stated, “If you put a gun in my hands, I will shoot myself before I shoot another man.” One hundred years later, the problem persists for conscientious objectors, according to Wachtell: "Today, there still is no way for conscientious objectors to declare their convictions in the compulsory draft registration process, and that needs to change." However, says Wachtell, "there is a simple fix" which also dates back to WWI, and could be implemented today as it was by President Wilson then. Read more about how America's WWI experience offers a solution for a 21st Century problem.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Belleau Wood

Episode #74
Highlights: June 1918 Overview

Highlights: June 1918 Overview

June 1918 Overview roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @01:35

Not all quiet on the western front - Mike Shuster | @15:30

National Memorial Day Parade | @19:55

369th Experience Memorial Weekend concerts | @22:05

East Indians in WW1 - Tanveer Kalo | @25:35

Belgian Children’s “Thank You” - Nancy Heingartner | @32:15

100C/100M in Bismarck, ND - Susan Wefald | @39:25

Speaking WW1: Cantonment | @44:50

WW1 War Tech: FlammenWerfer | @46:15

Dispatch Newsletter Highlights | @48:45

The Buzz: Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:40


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier

How much do we know about the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier? Much less than we might think, Patrick K. O'Donnell shows us in his new book, The Unknowns: The Untold Story of America's Unknown Soldier and WWI's Most Decorated Heroes Who Brought Him Home. This week on WWrite, O'Donnell gives us a glimpse into the epic story that sheds light on the Unknown Soldier and the eight WWI heroes who brought him home. Not to miss!


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Aubrey Woolsey

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Pvt. Aubrey Woolsey, born on 26 May 1890 in Linn Creek, Missouri. He was inducted into the army on 11 December 1917 and trained as a member of Company K, 354th Infantry, 89th Division. He shipped to France on 24 April 1918 as member of a casual detachment of the 3rd Division and once ‘Over There’ was assigned to combat duty with Company G, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. During actions at Soissons, on 20 July 1918 Private Woolsey was killed in action by rifle fire. He was first interred in a shell hole grave that same day. Doughboy MIA did an investigation into Private Woolsey’s case in November, 2017 and discovered that on 16 August 1918 his remains were moved from that battlefield grave to Temporary Cemetery #36, and following that his remains were moved at least two more times. During one of these moves – almost certainly the third one – the identification of his remains was lost and Private Woolsey now lies in a grave marked as ‘Unknown’ at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood, his name commemorated on the Wall of the Missing there.

How did we get this far with Private Woolsey’s case? Investigation! But that kind of investigation takes funding. Would you like to help us solve cases? Then consider giving ‘Ten for Them’; a tax deductible donation of ten bucks to Doughboy MIA. We are non-profit and committed to making a full accounting of the 4,423 missing American servicemen from WW1. Please visit… and give today, and remember 

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Laura Pepper Poster

Laura Pepper WWI Poster: $12.50

Laura Pepper, an English artist living in the UK, was moved to produce this commemorative image to mark the historic First World War Centenary (originally an oil on canvas but a complete departure from her usual genre).

The spirit of the time is conveyed by the use of sepia tones. However, it is foremost a symbolic painting which she hopes the viewer will find both atmospheric and poignant, connecting with the present generation as they reflect on the battles fought by their relatives and the human cost involved, personal reflection encouraged by national and international commemorative events over this centenary period.

To this end, some nineteen key battle names are mentioned in the entanglement of barbed wire and the five poppies are symbolic of those five years of war in which a generation was lost.

As she wanted the image to resonate with the widest possible audience, the lone soldier is not specific to any particular regiment and is intentionally not wearing a steel helmet (first introduced to British soldiers in 1915), as she wanted to accentuate the vulnerability of the men on the battlefield in such basic uniform.

The destiny of the lone soldier walking a path where so many soldiers have trodden before him is for the viewer to decide - is he symbolic of the survivors of battle or of the fallen?

The role of the Royal Flying Corps in reconnaissance and artillery observation is acknowledged. The fractured cartwheel in the bottom right-hand corner of the picture represents in particular the role of the horse and mule in WW1, used mostly to transport ammunition and supplies to the Front, they sustained heavy losses in appalling conditions.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


H. (Henry) Stuart Hotchkis 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org 

H (Henry) Stuart Hotchkiss

 

Submitted by: T. J. Cullinane, community historian

 

H. (Henry) Stuart Hotchkiss born around 1878, He served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

H. (Henry) Stuart Hotchkiss, a prominent and successful manufacturing executive, served as a commissioned officer on the Bureau of Aircraft Production both in Washington D.C. and France during the First World War.

Hotchkiss was born in New Haven, Connecticut on October 1, 1878 to Henry L. and Jane (Trowbridge) Hotchkiss. A graduate of the prestigious Phillips Academy (Class of 1897) he went on to earn a Bachelor of Philosophy degree from Yale in 1900. 

Hotchkiss gained his first bit of military experience while serving in the Connecticut Naval Reserve from 1899 – 1901. He began his career in the manufacturing industry by joining L. Candee & Company, a subsidiary of the United States Rubber Company in 1901. He would remain with the firm for 29 years, advancing to position of vice-president.

Read H. (Henry) Stuart Hotchkiss's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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May 29, 2018

Pie Truck trim

In DC Memorial Day Parade, Copperthite pie company heir recalls efforts which provided ‘Dough for the Doughboys’

At first glance, the black Model T box truck – replete with it’s creamy-white “Connecticut – Copperthite Pie Company” lettering – may have seemed hopelessly out of place. Why would a century-old delivery van be included in Washington, D.C.’s Memorial Day Parade? After all, Memorial Day is a time set aside to commemorate our fallen military heroes. Pies are for the post-parade picnics – a pleasant by-product of the late-spring holiday.

Pie Truck side

It may have surprised spectators at the parade to learn that the pristine Model T – and hundreds of others just like it – actually played an important part in helping the Allied forces win World War I. Writer Anthony Hayes in the Baltimore Post Examiner tells the amazing World War I history behind the quaint pie truck and its owners.

Float

The 2018 Washington, DC Memorial Day parade was sponsored in part by the United States World War One Centennial Commission, which had a float and numerous other WWI-related vehicles and units in the parade.


Experience the 369th Experience in NYC Memorial Day weekend via new gallery

369th Experience Gallery

For the 369th Experience concert series in NYC over Memorial Day weekend, we created a new kind of ONLINE experience on our web site as well. We pulled together social media posts from Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube all tagged with #369Experience. All the pictures and video come together on the Commission website at ww1cc.org/369th-experience-gallery.html to provide a wonderful social media story that spans history, the concerts and the experience of the participants. Check out the photo gallery here.


POLITICO title

POLITICO Magazine article offers in-depth look at current status of new national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC 

POLITICO Magazine published a broad-ranging and insightful article on May 28 that takes a hard look at the obstacles facing  progress of the new national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC, and the opportunities which may emerge  to move forward on the project in the coming months. Writer Blake Paterson presents all sides in the current situation, and looks at the challenges which must be overcome  for the Memorial to progress. Click here to read the entire article.


“Incomparable bravery” gave U.S. Marines victory at Belleau Wood

Marine Corps Marker at Belleau Wood

Tony Perry, long-time reporter for the Los Angeles Times who made multiple trips to Iraq and Afghanistan during his writing career, takes a thoughtful look at the Battle of Belleau Wood, which began on June 1, 1918, in an exclusive article for the US World War Centennial Commission web site. Perry notes that "historians have concluded that, from the beginning, the (German) High Command knew that the significance of Belleau Wood was not which side could capture and hold terrain. The significance was whether the Americans, whose numbers were rapidly increasing along the front, could face the Germans as equals." Read how the Marine Corps answered that question definitively in 1918 here.

Schoonover

The Defense Media Network also writes about Belleau Wood this week, pointing out how pivotal the battle was for the entire war. Noting that in 1918 the Allied armies "having been bled white and wracked by mutiny after three horrific years of trench warfare, were at the breaking point,"  and the "last hope" for victory were the American forces which were starting to arrive, writer Dwight Jon Zimmerman says that "The question on both sides of the trenches was not if the growing number of American units would fight, but rather how well? Only combat would answer that question."  Read the entire DMN article.


Lowdermilk book aims to "shine the light of awareness" of WWI for next generation

Lowdermilk

The Great War may have ended 100 years ago, but the ways in which it influences and affects the generations today are diverse and fascinating. Upon receiving the diary of his grandfather, a World War I veteran, writer and photographer Jeffrey Lowdermilk was inspired to honor the memory of George A. Carlson by traversing the same journey he took across Europe, reliving the experiences by visiting the towns, battlefields, and landscapes described in the diary. He has since published a book, Honoring The Doughboys, Following My Grandfather’s WWI Diary, describing his journey, accompanied with contemporary photographs of the places he visited as well as diary excerpts. In addition, Mr. Lowdermilk has donated several copies of Honoring the Doughboys to the Centennial Commission’s Memorial Fund. We asked him a few questions about his donation as well as the journey in his book, 


"There But Not There" silhouettes honor WWI fallen, support military charities

There but Not There

A new nationwide campaign to commemorate the centenary of World War One and raise funds for military charities was launched across the United States this week. The campaign is called ‘There But Not There’ and all across the United States, six foot tall, life size Soldier Silhouettes have sprung up to remind people of the great contribution made by U.S. and allied forces 100 years ago. The campaign is a U.S. World War 1 Centennial Commission Commemorative Partner. Members of the public are being encouraged to buy 10 inch versions of the poignant silhouettes, made by veterans, to raise funds for U.S. and British military charities. Read more about the program and how you and/or  your organization can be involved.


Monument honoring famous WWI war dog SGT Stubby dedicated in CT

Stubby group

A new monument in Connecticut honors service animals -- with a statue of one of the nation's most famous war dogs. The sculpture, "Stubby Salutes," was unveiled Saturday in Veterans Memorial Park in Middletown. US World War One Centennial Commission (WW1CC) Commissioner John Monahan (on right in photo at right) was among the notables participating in the dedication ceremony. SGT Stubby was a Boston-terrier mix that traveled to Europe with the U.S. Army's renown 26th "Yankee Division" during World War I. His story was the subject of a major animated movie last month, "Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero"  which was endorsed by the WW1CC. The new bronze sculpture, created by artist Susan Bahary, is the culmination of a three-decade effort to create a memorial, spearheaded by the family of Robert Conroy, the army corporal who adopted Stubby during training. Read more about the sculpture and the ceremony here.


High school activities in Puy-de-Dome, France remember U.S. troops in WWI

Puy-de-Dome program

In the Commission office, we hear about various education and commemoration projects happening this year from all over the United States, as well as some happening in other countries. We are thrilled to hear of such activities, because this is how the stories of our WWI veterans will be remembered and passed on. We recently received word of a remarkable efforts in France's Puy-de-Dome region, that we wanted to share, because of its truly unique scope and location. Entitled “Remembrance and Commemoration”, it is a two-part project that includes long-term research, and a series of commemoration events from 2017-2019. The program is being led by Eddy Oziol, History Department Professor at the academy of Clermont-Ferrand. Professor Oziol is a noted historian, and collector of objects and documents regarding WWI and conflicts of the 20th Century. We had a chance to talk to him about their upcoming Memorial Day commemoration event, and the ongoing research efforts, as his students made Memorial Day preparations.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Munition worker at the National Shell Filling Factory, Chilwell, England

Episode #73:
A lotta shelling going on!

100 years ago this week: Drafting the young and the “idlers” | @01:15

War in the Sky: From Signal Corps to US Army Air Service | @07:40

Cantigny: AEF on the offensive - Mike Shuster & Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:15

Great War Channel: The Fightin-est Marine - Indy Neidell | @17:15

369th Experience in NYC memorial weekend | @18:25

The Moralis: New Woodrow Wilson Book - Prof. Patricia O’Toole | @21:15

Update from the States: Artillery, dissenters and shells - Michael Hitt | @27:15

Remembering Vets: PTSD and Trauma - Dr. Jason Crouthamel | @32:45

Speaking WWI: Some onomatopoeia -Whizzband, Crump and Dud | @39:35

WW1 War Tech: The bicycle in WW1 | @41:15

Weekly Dispatch: Article highlights from the newsletter | @44:25

The Buzz: Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @46:25


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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I Never Saw Him Drowning: Great-Uncle Charlie
and the Great War

By Philip Metres

American WWI soldier, Charlie Fitzpatrick, seems to have died two times. In 1918, he was pronounced dead to his sister, Sheila. In 1968, fifty years later, Sheila received a letter from the VA reporting the recent death of her brother. This week on WWrite, Philip Metres tells the story of his Great-Uncle Charlie, of his veteran father, and of his own exploration of war through writing and poetry. Don't miss this moving Memorial Day post!


Doughboy MIA for week of May 28

Blyth

A man is only missing if he is forgotten. 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Verne Blythe, born in Marshall, Indiana on May 28th in 1892. Blythe was working as a telegraph operator in Danville, Illinois before the war for what would eventually become AT&T when he enlisted in early June, 1917. He received his training at Jefferson Barracks in Missouri and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas before embarking for overseas duty on February 19th, 1918 as a member of Company C, 5th Field Signal Battalion which was part of the 3rd Division. During the second battle of the Marne – where the 3rd would gain everlasting fame as the ‘Rock of the Marne Division’ – Private Blythe was severely wounded by artillery fire on July 15th, 1918, and died soon thereafter. Little more of his story known at this time, but it is currently believed that he may have later been buried as an Unknown. 

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Key Chain

“Nothing Stops These Men” – Custom Key Tag: $9.95

Still one of the favorite commemoration items this handsome key tag is a great addition to your keys!

Inspired by an original World War One poster, this key tag features the dramatic image of a bayonet advance on the enemy, with the United States flag in the upper corner.

A functional way to show your patriotism, this  1-1/4” long, custom key tag has a bright gold finish, with color-fill, and is offered exclusively through the World War One Centennial Commission.This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Mohan Singh

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Mohan Singh

 

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

 

 

Mohan Singh born around 1884 or 1885, Mohan Singh served in World War 1 in the manner described below.. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service 

Mohan Singh was in Amballa Cantt, British India in either 1884 or 1885 to Heera Singh. He immigrated to the United States on December 13, 1913 from Southampton, England. Singh settled in Stockton, California. Mohan Singh attended the University of Utah and University of Minnesota for medicine. He is listed in the University of Minnesota's 1918-1919 student directory. The University of Utah has his student record.

Singh enlisted at ERC Fort Douglas, Utah on November 19, 1917. He was assigned to the Student Army Training Corps at the University of Minnesota.

Read Mohan Singh's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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May 22, 2018

WWI Centennial Commission to Feature Special World War I Tribute in DC's National Memorial Day Parade 

Parade

The National Memorial Day Parade is coming to Washington DC on Monday, May 28th. This parade is our nation’s largest Memorial Day event, drawing hundreds of thousands of spectators to the National Mall to pay tribute to those who have served. This year's parade will be huge -- including marching bands, flags, celebrities, veterans of all ages, 300,000 cheering attendees, and TV cameras that will broadcast the parade across the country. New for this year, the parade will feature the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission's special tribute to the American veterans of World War I. This special tribute will include several World War I-era military & support vehicles -- and for the first time ever -- a parade float to emphasize the centennial of WWI and America’s National WWI Memorial slated for Washington,  DC.  Read more about the parade, and how you can watch it live, on television, or online.


WWI Centennial Commission sponsors 369th Experience jazz events in New York City during Memorial Day weekend

369th Logo

The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, along with the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum Complex, are proud to sponsor performance by The 369th Experience during the Memorial Day Weekend.  The 369th Experience is a historic series of national and international programs and musical events depicting the African American and Puerto Rican experience in World War I through the eyes and ears of the 369th U.S. Infantry Regiment. We invite the public to join us on Memorial Day Weekend -- and to enjoy the classical Jazz stylings of the 369th regimental band as a part of New York City’s annual “Fleet Week” Celebrations. Read more about where and how you can catch The 369th Experience in NYC this weekend.


The New Yorker magazine interviews Sabin Howard about national WWI Memorial at Pershing Park in DC

The New Yorker magazine

In an article titled "There’s No First World War Memorial on the National Mall?" and subtitled "The sculptor Sabin Howard is jumping through hoops to right an art-historical wrong," reporter Anna Russel of The New Yorker magazine travels to Howard's Tribeca studio to see the sculptural maquette, and get the inside story on the creative process for the national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. Read the entire New Yorker magazine article here.


Pennsylvania WWI Symposium at US Army History and Education Center

Quilt

Betsy Anderson is the WW1CC's Volunteer Coordinator, and she manages the contributions from our various friends, who help us with event planning, social media writing, photography, partnerships, and administrative issues. Betsy recently had the pleasure of representing our Centennial Commission at a WWI Symposium sponsored by the Pennsylvania WWI Centennial Committee at the US Army History and Education Center in Carlisle, PA. We were thrilled that she was able take a few moments to talk about what she saw at the Carlisle event, including attendee Carol Sones' story quilt of her Doughboy grandfather (left). Read the entire interview here.


NY Guardsman Henry Johnson fought for his life with a knife on May 15, 1918

Henry Johnson square

He was 26 years old, 5-foot-4, weighed 130 pounds and came from Albany, New York. And on the night of May 15, 1918, Pvt. Henry Johnson, a member of the all-black 369th Infantry Regiment, found himself fighting for his life against 20 German Soldiers out in front of his unit's trench line. He fired the three rounds in his French-made rifle, tossed all his hand grenades and then grabbed his Army-issue bolo knife and started stabbing. He buried the knife in the head of one attacker and then disemboweled another German soldier. By the time what a reporter called "The Battle of Henry Johnson" was over, Johnson had been wounded 21 times and become the first American hero of World War I.  Read the entire article about Johnson's epic solo struggle here.


Proceedings due soon from "LaFayette U.S. voilà!" academic conference in Paris

LaFayette U.S. voilà!: The American Engagement in France, 1917-1918

The French Society of Cincinnati and the Sorbonne University organized an international history conference in recognition of the U.S. entry into World War I, "LaFayette U.S. voilà!: The American Engagement in France, 1917-1918" during November, 2017 in Paris. The symposium producers will publish the conference proceedings in the French language in October, via the Presses of the Sorbonne. The proceedings will be published a few months later in the English language, with a university in the United States. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the significance of the U.S. entry into World War One and how the this contributed to reviving the old friendship between France and America.  Read more about the conference and the upcoming proceedings here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

US Submarine Chasers of WWI

Episode #72
US Submarine Chasers of WWI

The 1918 Sedition Act | @01:35

Darkest before the dawn - Mike Shuster | @07:45

America Emerges - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:445

Memorial Day Parade | @15:50

Hunters of the Steel Sharks - Todd Woofenden | @17:05

Remembering Major Raoul Lufbery - Raoul Lubery III | @24:40

Centenary News website - Peter Alhadeff & Patrick Gregory | @31:20

Speaking WWI - “I’m in a flap” | @38:15

Highlights of the Dispatch Newsletter | @39:30

The Buzz: The commemoration in social Media - Katherine Akey | @41:45


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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How to write a war poem

Have you ever tried to write a war poem? This is Faleeha Hassan’s question for WWrite this week. This Iraqi-American poet and war refugee shows it’s no different for her than it was for the poets of WWI. Don’t miss this eye-opening, startling post about the process of writing war poetry.


Doughboy MIA for week of May 21, 2018

Dailey

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Howard Dailey.  Born June 10th, 1894 in Scottsburg, Indiana, Corporal Howard Jackson Dailey was a farmer before joining the pre-war army seeking to be part of the ‘adventure’ of chasing Poncho Villa down on the border. He enlisted August 5th, 1916 and trained at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. Assigned to Company M, 16th Infantry Regiment, he got something of his wish and his first duty station was at Eagle Pass, Texas. Following the declaration of war he cooled his heels in Texas while waiting for orders. Eventually sent to New York, he embarked for overseas duty in November, 1917. Once in France he was transferred to Company C of the 30th Infantry (3rd Division) and was killed in action on July 20th, 1918 in the heavy fighting at Soissons. He was buried near the Paris-Soissons road, but his remains were never located 

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

tote bag

Canvas & Leather Tote
$58.95

Function and style are combined in this lightweight and compact Canvas & Leather Tote. You can show your American pride while carrying this Made in the USA dark khaki tote. Plenty of room for keys, wallet, tablet and documents. A distressed “U.S.” imprint is prominently displayed on the bag and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorates the U.S. Centennial of World War One.

Tote features: Constructed of touch dyed canvas and lined with 400 denier nylon. Handles made of 6 Oz. top grain oil tanned leather, backed with 1” webbing. Handle is attached to bag with distinctive “X” tacks. Dimensions: 18.5” W (seam to seam) x 13.5”H x 5.0” T-bottom style gusset. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the national WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Fred Meyers 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Fred Meyers

 

Submitted by: Pat Roblewsky {grandson}

Fred Meyers born around 1896, Fred Meyers served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

 Enlistment

Fred Meyers, a 20 year old farmer from Britton, South Dakota, enlisted in the Army on April 18, 1917. Fred Meyers was assigned to the 59th Depot Brigade 1st S. Dakota Cavalry. In September of 1917 Fred was sent to Boot Camp at Camp Dodge, Iowa. Sometime in October of 1917, he was sent to Camp Cody near Deming in New Mexico for training. Fred Meyers was there until June 1918. In June he traveled to France by way of England to be among the first combat troops to fight in the war with Germany. 

Training

Sometime around September 14 or 15, 1917 Fred Meyers left Britton, South Dakota for Boot Camp at Camp Dodge in Iowa. His travel took him to Omaha, Nebraska. Fred probably arrived at Camp Dodge on or about September 17, 1917. It is not known how long he was at Camp Dodge, but it can be assumed that this was his basic military training. He probably learned Military Order and Discipline, i.e. bed making, marching, rules and etc.

Read Fred Meyers's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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