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Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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June 11, 2019

FREE World War I Genealogy Research Guide still being offered for limited time! 

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During our Fleet Week activities in New York City in May, the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission (WWICC) highlighted a new genealogical tool that has a limited-time offer attached. The World War I Genealogy Research Guide helps trace American military and noncombatant ancestors. It is provided courtesy of WWICC and the Doughboy Foundation. This guide is authored by Debra M. Dudek, with a foreword by Col. Gerald York, grandson of Medal of Honor recipient Alvin York. As well as over 100 pages of information and guidance, it features over 250 links to resources on the Web. The guide is available in PDF form, free of charge.  Click here to be among the first 5,000 people who download it FREE. After the download limit has been reached, it can be purchased in book form online or wherever books are sold. Get your copy of the WWI Genealogy Research Guide now!


National History Day WWI Webinar Series Scholarships deadline June 30

National History Day logo

National History Day (NHD) has engaged with several partners to commemorate the World War I Centennial. NHD has created resources to offer different perspectives on the war, engage students with unique primary sources, and remember those who served and sacrificed as part of the war effort. Free tuition and credit is available for two teachers from every NHD Affiliate. Through this program, teachers can earn a certificate of professional development hours or three graduate extension credit units from the University of San Diego. Applications for a scholarship will be accepted through July 30, 2019. Click here to read more about this exciting opportunity for teachers to be part of the Legacies of World War I Webinar series in the fall.


Park University to Host Valor Medals Review Program at National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City

Valor Medals Review logo small

On Wednesday, June 19, Park University will host a program “From Kansas City to Washington, D.C.: World War I Valor Medals Review,” at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Mo., starting at 6:30 p.m. Admission to the event is free and open to the public, but attendees must  RSVP. In mid-April, the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and Park University announced that they were spearheading the effort of a Congress-led systematic review of minority veterans who served in World War I who may have been denied the Medal of Honor due to race. Information on that effort can be found here on the Centennial Commission's web site. To find out more about the event in Kandsas City, and to RSVP to attend, click here.

Task & Purpose ampersand

The Task and Purpose military and veterans web site published an extensive article last week on the Valor Medals Review project. Click here to read the entire article on the Task and Purpose web site.


Kudos to the NYC Parks Conservation Team for their work on WWI Memorials

Bronx Victory Memorial

The World War I Centennial may be over, but the NYC Parks continue its mission and mandate to preserve the city's touchstones of the past, including all of the 102 World War I monuments in the city’s parks, such as the Bronx Victory Memorial at left. In the run up to Memorial Day, the NYC Parks' small but dedicated field staff were engaged in ongoing care of many World War I memorials. This work included detailed cleaning, waxing, and minor repairs. Click here for more about this effort to make the WWI memorials in NYC look their very best for Memorial Day 2019.

 

Riverdale Memorial Bell Tower Door

In related news, NYC Parks’ Citywide Monuments Conservation Program (CMCP), a public-private partnership, recently commissioned a precise replica of the severely deteriorated oak door at this landmark monument. The new door (seen at left)  was fashioned by master carpenter Tim Fagin, and reuses the original forged decorative ironwork. The project was supported in part by a $2,000 award from the US World War I Centennial Commission’s 100 Cities/100 Memorials Grant Program, with oversight by NYC Parks Art & Antiquities. Click here to read more about this remarkable restoration project for a key NYC World War I memorial.


Teaching the Great War 100 Years Later

Chris Davis

When Chris Davis (left) was asked by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro History Department what course he would like to teach for the fall of 2018, there was no hesitation in his response: he wanted "to teach a course that gave The Great War its due." In the fourth year of his Ph.D. program in U.S. History at Greensboro, Chris got his wish: not only would he be teaching a course on his favorite topic: WWI, but this course would coincide with the centennial of the war’s end. Click here to read more about the course, the content, the students, and how the results reinforced Chris' determination to "keep the public interest now that we have had the opportunity to temporarily seize it" about the significance of World War I.


New Online Exhibition: "The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I"

AFS poster

"The Volunteers: Americans Join World War I" examines the stories of the young American men and women who transformed the meaning of volunteerism in World War I. Prompted by altruism, personal ambition, a search for adventure or hope for an Allied-led redemption of a devastated Europe, these American volunteers engaged in the war before the United States entered the conflict. Click here to learn more about this digital exhibition, produced by the National World War I Museum and Memorial in collaboration with AFS Intercultural Programs, which shares the inspirational stories of these American volunteers.


World War I Memorial in Covington, Ohio honors over 250 local men who served

Covington, OH memorial

The 2019 Memorial Day festivities were like no other as the Village of Covington in Ohio honored those residents who fought in World War I with a monument. Nearly 300 Covington servicemen fought in World War I with the United States Army’s 148th Infantry Regiment in the battles to liberate Belgium in 1918. On hand to represent Belgium in paying respects for the sacrifices of the Covington servicemen who sacrificed on behalf of freedom was Lieutenant Colonel Heidi Libert of the Belgian Armed Forces. Click here to read more about this memorial, and watch video of the unveiling ceremony.


World War I veterans "will not be forgotten" as new monument is revealed in Jefferson County, Georgia

Jefferson County GA memorial

The names of 26 Jefferson County, Georgia men who gave their lives in service to their country during WWI were revealed, etched in granite, on a new monument in the newly redesigned veterans plaza on the county courthouse lawn Thursday, June 6. The WWI monument is part of a veterans plaza originally started last year by Dr. Lamar Veatch, a Jefferson County native and member of the WWI Commission who brought the idea of a WWI memorial to the board of commissioners and historical society. Click here to read more about this new Memorial in Georgia to recognize the sacrifices of the World War I veterans.


How vaccines and vigilance could have stopped the World War I pandemic

Influenza nurse Walter Reed

Just one century ago, the world was in the grips of one of the deadliest pandemics in history. At least 50 million people – 3 percent of the world's population – were killed by the Spanish influenza pandemic that swept across the planet, considerably more lives lost than in World War I, which was also occurring at the time. While much has changed since this chapter of the 20th century ended, the story of Spanish flu still holds a valuable lesson in not underestimating the pathogens we share Earth with. Click here to read about a new study which has detailed that the outbreak sharply highlights the importance of vaccination programs and the risks of complacency when it comes to communicable diseases in the globalized world.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

100 Years Ago This Week:
The Middle East 

Versailles mandates talks

May 24th's edition of the WWI Centennial News Podcast, Episode 124. Podcast Researcher Dave Kramer jumps into the WWI centennial time machine to look at the Middle East 100 years ago. A major challenge, and one that frustrates President Wilson time after time, comes from the wartime agreements between nations, oftentimes secret, that addressed short-term war needs but created long-term headaches. Click here to read the entire transcript of this fascinating look at the complex Middle East events a century ago that were the prologue for the intractable Middle East issues of today.

Events:
"Votes for Women"
Exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. with Dr. Kate Clarke Lemay

Dr. Kate Clarke Lemay

In May 24th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 124, host Theo Mayer interviewed Dr. Kate Clarke Lemay, a historian at the National Portrait Gallery in downtown Washington, D.C. Dr. Lemay curated the new "Votes for Women: Portrait of Persistence" exhibit at the Portrait Gallery. Click here to find out more about the exhibit, the history of the women's suffrage movement, and how the movement intersected with World War I.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Classroom 1919

Episode #126
Teaching & Learning WWI

Host - Theo Mayer


Lafayette, Here We Go Again -  Host | @ 02:15
Killing the Angel of Peace
- Mike Shuster | @ 07:15
War Memoirs From WWI: “Siegfried Sassoon”
- Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 11:30
Updates From The States: Hawaii
- Col. Arthur Tulak (ret.) | @ 17:20
Education in 1919
- Host | @ 25:15
WWI Educator’s Tool Kits
- Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein | @ 28:15
Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
- Ron Nash | @ 36:25


Literature in WWI This Week

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“They were mortal, but they were unconquerable.” Willa Cather and the WWI Memorial in Washington

By Mark A. R. Facknitz

What does it mean that Willa Cather 's words from her novel, One of Ours, "They were mortal, but they were unconquerable,"will join Woodrow Wilson, Archibald MacLeish, and the American nurse Alta May Andrews on the future WWI Memorial in D.C.'s Pershing Park?

That two of the four whose words will be immortalized in stone are women is remarkable, representing the maturation of our sensibilities as we grasp more completely that the long-term consequences of wars transcend gender. As WWI literary specialist and historical advisor to the WWI Commission, Mark Facknitz, explains in this post, they also exceed the usual limits of class, region, and literary prejudices. Discover Willa Cather's impact on war and literature by reading “They were mortal, but they were unconquerable.” Willa Cather and the WWI Memorial in Washington at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

A sister mourns for her younger brother, killed just days before his 22nd birthday -- his body never found. Read more at "The Unreturning."


Doughboy MIA for week of June 10

Arthur Wylie

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week  is Private First Class Arthur Wylie. Born at Forsyth County, Georgia in March, 1899, the only son of James and Ida Wylie, Arthur C. Wylie enlisted in the Georgia National Guard at Atlanta on 23 July, 1917 and was assigned to Company K, 5th Infantry, GNG. Stationed at Camp Wheeler, at Macon, Georgia, the year before this unit had been federalized for duty on the Mexican Border as Company K, 122nd Infantry. Following the declaration of war in 1917, the 122nd had been assigned duty with the 31st ‘Dixie Division’ which would go overseas as a replacement division in September, 1918.

By that time however, then Private First Class Wylie had received machine gun training with the 122nd before sailing for France aboard the troopship Elpenor on 20 June, 1918 as a member of Company #1, Camp Wheeler June Automatic Replacement Draft, which had been drawn from Camp Wheeler trainees. Ten days later he landed in France and a week after that he had been assigned to Company B, 150th Machine Gun Battalion, 42nd ‘Rainbow’ Division. He was with them but a short time when, on 18 July, 1918, he was killed in action, having been in France barely 18 days.

PFC Wylie is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. Nothing else is known about his case at this time.

Want to help shed some light on PFC Wylies’s case? Consider making a donation toto Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. It takes only a moment and your tax deductible contribution can be as large as you want or as small as $10.00 on our ‘Ten for Them’ program. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget jacket

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.



Guy E. Golterman, Sr.

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Guy Golterman, Sr.

 

Submitted by: Ed Golterman {Grandson}

Guy E. Golterman, Sr. was born around 1879. Guy Golterman served in World War 1 with the American wartime industry supplying the armed forces. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

Story of Service

As Director of the Nation’s Forum, Guy Golterman produced the most important series of recordings in US History, led by Pershing’s Address from the Battlefields. Mr. Golterman marshaled the recording and radio industries to the war effort, and to capture all the major statements leading up to the elections of 1920.

Pershing’s was the first recording of a General made on a battlefield in history. The Forum did its job well a century ago and we have the voices today.

Read Guy E Golterman Sr.'s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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June 04, 2019

National World War I Memorial moves ahead with Pershing Park plan

Memorial corner

The Architect's Newspaper, an authoritative architectural publication that covers the United States in monthly printed issues and online, recently published an in-depth article on the progress and status of the new National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. The article features thoughtful comments from the Memorial's designer, architect Joseph Weishaar, and sculptor Sabin Howard. Click here to read the entire article on where the approval process for the Memorial stands now, and when construction is planned to begin.

TV in Bingamton, NY

Elsewhere, the Memorial project received broad television coverage throughout the nation last week via Nexstar Media, the second-largest television station owner in the United States (after Sinclair Broadcast Group) with 171 television stations across the U.S. The chain broadcast a Memorial Day article on progress of the National WWI Memorial. Click here to watch the video as it appeared on NewsChannel 34 in Binghamton, New York last week.


2019 Fleet Week New York is a Wrap! 

Fleet Week logo

2019 Fleet Week New York is one for the books. Now in its 31st year, FWNY is the city’s time-honored celebration of the sea services. It is an unparalleled opportunity for the citizens of New York and the surrounding tri-state area to meet Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen, as well as witness firsthand the latest capabilities of today’s maritime services. This year was unique in that Fleet Week New York was also a celebration of a tradition of service. Fleet Week 2019 had a special World War I theme, and as such, included a number of activities -- concerts, exhibits, events, ceremonies, etc. -- to tell the story of World War I, and remember its heroes. Click here to read the entire article about how World War I was the Fleet Week focus in 2019.


Blue Lake, CA man who died in World War I honored in New York’s Fleet Week

USS San Diego

The story of how a Humboldt County native’s name, alongside those of five other U.S. Navy sailors, ended up on a memorial plaque in New York City on Tuesday begins in 1918 — the final year of World War I. In July of that year a mine laid by a German U-boat off the coast of Fire Island, New York, detonated against the hull of the USS San Diego. One of the sailors who perished that summer day in 1918 was 24-year-old Blue Lake native James F. Rochat, born in 1894  in Humboldt County. On May 28, the WWI Centennial Commission and the Navy hosted the memorial plaque unveiling in Times Square in honor of the six men who lost their lives - among them, Engineman 2nd Class James Rochet. Click here to read more about the cascade of events large and small that led to California-born Rochat's WWI death on the nation's East Coast, and the 21st Century honor for he and his fellow sailors who died in the only capital ship the Navy lost in WWI.


Who are the vets on the WWI Bremerton Memorial and why are some missing?

Elisabeth Demmon

Twenty bronze plaques on a chunk of concrete. It seemed a simple enough assignment for researcher Elisabeth Demmon as she copied the names of 11 soldiers, five sailors and four Marines off a memorial for those who “fought and died” in World War I at Bremerton’s Evergreen-Rotary Park. Her mission: learn who these men were. “I thought it was going to be a straightforward project,” said Demmon, a library research associate at Kitsap Regional Library working on her master’s degree in genealogical studies. “I had no idea what I was in for.” Click here to read how an apparently simple assignment turned into a remarkable odyssey of surprises through 100-year-old history in Washington state.


'Polar Bear' memorial in Troy, MI marks largely forgotten mission in WWI Russia

Polar Bear

The Polar Bears were some 5,000 soldiers of the American North Russian Expeditionary Forces, most of them from Michigan. They fought the Bolsheviks with guns and cannons in Russia's frozen northern reaches for seven deadly months after the November 1918 armistice that ended World War I. Their mission was unclear, their president reluctant, and their weaponry ill-suited for the conditions. Largely forgotten outside Metro Detroit, they were remembered on Monday, May 27 in the 90th annual WWI Polar Bear Memorial Service in Troy. Click here to read more about the remembrance a century later for the only American soldiers to ever battle Russians.


Construction set to begin on new World War I Memorial in West Duluth, MN

Duluth Memorial

A $60,000 construction project is set to begin in June for a new World War I memorial at Memorial Park to honor more than 20 West Duluth soldiers. A new concrete surrounding and a flag pole will be installed in the park on the corner of Central and Grand Ave. The memorial will also pay tribute to over one hundred fifty World War One Gold Stars members. Click here to read more and watch video about this new Midwest memorial to replace an original lost to time and vandalism.


New USS Kansas City crew attends Memorial Day ceremonies at National World War I Museum & Memorial

USS Kansas City

Crew members from a brand new U.S. Navy ship, the USS Kansas City, paid their respects at last Monday's Memorial Day public ceremonies at Liberty Memorial. It`s always a sacred time when thankful Kansas Citians gather to thank their military heroes. However, this year's gathering was unique. This year's guests of honor included the crew of the forthcoming USS Kansas City, a U.S. Navy vessel that`s due to be commissioned next year. Click here to read more about the new ship, and the Memorial Day Services at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City.


Once World War I enemies, Minneapolis musicians shared bond over French horn left on battlefield

French Horn Friendship

With all its brass curves, a lost French horn wound up in what the 1927 Minneapolis Daily Star called “the center of one of the most amazing coincidents … " Wilhelm Muelbe and Fred Keller were born nearly seven years and 4,300 miles apart in the late-1800s. They wound up fighting — and playing in military bands — on opposite sides of World War I a century ago. In the chaos of the American Saint-Mihiel offensive in northeastern France in 1918, Muelbe had to abandon his treasured Cruspy French horn as the German Army retreated. Nine years later, the horn reappeared under the most amazing circumstances an ocean away. Click here to read the entire remarkable story of men, music, and the mysterious ways that Fate can move.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering Veterans: Luca Angeli on Italian-born Doughboys 

Back Over There menu

In May 17th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 123, host Theo Mayer spoke with Luca Angeli about his project commemorating Italian-born Doughboys who died fighting for the United States. A native of Italy, Mr. Angeli has spent time working in the United States, following in the footsteps of his great-grandfather. His research about his great-grandfather led him into the stories of the many Italians who went "back Over There" as members of the U.S. Army in WWI, and died in their native land on behalf of their new nation. Click here to read the whole interview, and learn stories sparked an amazing research project that now spans two continents and two web sites a century after World War I.

100 Years Ago This Week: The League and Treaty as Viewed In America

Wilson

May 17th's edition of the WWI Centennial News Podcast, Episode 123, World War I Centennial News researcher and writer Dave Kramer explores the story of the Paris Peace Conference not only as it played out in the halls of Versailles, in Germany's Weimar, in the United Kingdom's parliament, but also here in America's Washington, DC.  Click here to read this rich report recalling the raucous political battles in America that ultimately sent the Versailles Treaty down to defeat in the United States Senate a century ago.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Womens Suffrage Storefront

Episode #125
The Century of Suffrage:

Host - Theo Mayer

Making Peace: Who Will Save Armenia? -
Mike Shuster | @ 03:00

War Memoirs From WWI: “Ernst Jünger”  -
Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 07:10

100 Years Ago: Women’s Suffrage, The Cliff Notes -
Host | @ 11:50

Raising Money for the Memorial -
Phil Mazzara | @ 19:40

Introducing the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission -
Rebecca Kleefish | @ 28:40

Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch -
Host | @ 37:45


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

"Zone Rouge" and "The Land Remembers"

By Amalie Flynn
Amalie Flynn, author of the memoir Wife and War: The Memoir, the story of she tells of surviving 9-11 and her husband's 15-month deployment to Afghanistan, shows in her poems "Zone rouge" (red zone) and "The Land Remembers" that her experience also belongs to a universal history of war, including WWI. "Zone rouge" is the French name for the almost 120,000 hectares of battlefields that incurred major physical damage to the environment during WWI. Read Flynn, who has also published in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, and TIME, as she brings a contemporary poetic eye to France's battle-torn landscapes at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Winifred Letts enlisted as a Volunteer Aid Detachment nurse and worked in military hospitals through much of the First World War. Her poem "Spring the Cheat" contrasts the season of regeneration and rebirth with the devastating losses felt by those on the home front.


Doughboy MIA for week of June 3

Fred Allison

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Fred M. Allison, born in 1894 at Savannah, Georgia, the son of John H. and Maria S. Allison and one of four children. A carpenter’s helper by trade, he enlisted in the Regular Army on 15 May, 1917 at the Army Recruiting Station in Savannah. He was sent to Fort Logan, Colorado for training where he was assigned to Company A, 2nd Engineers on 22 May, 1917. This unit would eventually be integral to the 2nd ‘Indian Head’ Division. He departed for France aboard the SS Carpathia on 10 September, 1917 and once in France was quickly promoted to Private First Class (in December, 1917) and Corporal (in April, 1918). During the heavy fighting that summer, Corporal Allison fought through the battle of Belleau Wood and all the fighting that came after, where the 2nd Division wrote its way into history. On 19 July, 1918 Corporal Allison was killed in action. Today, he is memorialized on the Tablets to the Missing at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery at Belleau Wood. Few other details are known of his case at this time.               

Want to help shed some light on Corporal Allison’s case? Consider making a donation' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Black Pique Polo Shirt

Black Pique
Polo Shirt

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA polo shirt. An informal term for a member of the U.S. Army or Marine Corps, “doughboys” especially used to refer to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War One. Largely comprised of young men who had dropped out of school to join the army, this poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago.

Shirt features: Navy with white doughboy embroidery. 100% combed cotton pique, 6.2 oz. pre-shrunk fabric. Shirt has 3 wood-tone buttons, and side seam design for shape retention. Mens’ sizes available S – 2XL.

Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.



Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette

 

Submitted by: Thomas, "T.J." Cullinane {Town Historian}

Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette was born in 1890. Louis Paquette served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

A Derry Shoemaker in the Coast Artillery

Few portraits in the Derry, New Hampshire Great War Soldier’s Album are more compelling than that of Louis Arthur Paquette, late of Battery A, 71st Coast Artillery Corps. Upright and earnest, the handsome young Paquette proudly displays his New Hampshire War Service Medal and First Army artillery patch. “Slip,” as he was popularly known, was born in Derry on December 30, 1890. The town records state that the industrious shoe maker enlisted at age 26 on March 8, 1918.

Like many New England soldiers, he would begin his Army career with recruit training at Fort Slocum, New York. This post was located on David’s Island at the southern end of Long Island Sound in the city environs of New Rochelle.

Soon after completing his training, he was given serial number 402214 and assigned to Battery A of the 71st Coast Artillery Corps. At this juncture, Slip was destined to spend the war manning a huge coastal artillery battery in Boston Harbor’s Fort Strong. This was not to be however, as there was an urgent need for heavy mobile artillery in the American Expeditionary Force deployed in France.

Read Louis Arthur "Slip" Paquette's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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May 28, 2019

Fox & Friends

World War I remembrance is focus at Fleet Week New York 2019 events

World War I was a persistent theme throughout Fleet Week New York 2019, which wound up yesterday. The scale model maquette of the sculpture for the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC took center stage on Fox and Friends as the big event kicked off last week, and was also featured at the Navy's opening reception. Click here to watch the Fox and Friends video. Click on the links below for image galleries of these and other Fleet Week events where America's WWI veterans were remembered.

John J. Harvey

With the help of the historic fireboat John J. Harvey, painted in World War I "dazzle" camouflage pattern, the U.S. WWI Centennial Commission welcomed the U.S.S. New York as she led the parade of ships into New York Harbor to kick off Fleet Week New York. Click here to see striking photos from New York Harbor.

de Blasio at reception

The United States World War I Centennial Commission joined Admiral Christopher W. Grady, Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and other Sea Service leaders, and city officials, for a special reception to mark the start of Fleet Week New York. Among the attendees was New York Mayor Bill De Blasio, who had a chance to see the Memorial maquette. Click here to see photos from the reception, which included a performance by cast members of the "Hello Girls" Off-Broadway musical.

Sawyer the Sea Dog

The American Kennel Club Museum of the Dog in New York was the site of two World War I events: the dedication of the Sergent Stubby sculpture, with remarks by Commission Dr. Libby O'Connell, and a visit from Sawyer the Sea Dog (left), mascot of the U.S. Navy Museum in Washington, D.C., who appeared in his own unique World War I Navy uniform, along with several WWI Navy Living History Reenactors.

USS San Diego plaque

The U.S World War I Centennial Commission unveiled a new memorial plaque honoring the crew of the U.S. Navy WWI heavy cruiser USS San Diego during Fleet Week. Commission Vice Chair Edwin Fountain helped unveil the plaque, and spoke at the event in Times Square. The plaque will be permanently placed in Ocean Beach, N.Y. later this summer to honors the USS San Diego, sunk by enemy action off the coast of New York's Fire Island , and the six U.S. Navy sailors who were lost in the tragedy. 

The 369th Experience, sponsored by the World War I Centennial Commission, was all over town during Fleet Week, with performances at Rockefeller Center (below) as well as at Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem, and leading the annual Brooklyn Memorial Day Parade. Click here for more images of the 369th Experience at Rockefeller Center.

369th Experience at Rockefeller Center

Special Memorial Day Mass in Baltimore for AEF & Polish-American 'Blue Army' WWI vets

Polish Army in France

The Maryland Catholic War Veterans (CWV) and Auxiliary hosted the Maryland “Catholic War Veterans Centennial World War I Memorial Mass” this past Sunday, at Saint Casimir Church, Baltimore, Maryland. The Services honored the veterans of World War l, as well as the veterans of General Joseph Haller’s 'Blue Army' Volunteers of WWI. In the ceremony, the American Legion's General Joseph Haller Post 95 was recognized on its 100 Anniversary.  Click here to read more about these services specifically to honor those forgotten heroes of World War l.


KU rededicates WWI memorial ‘Victory Eagle’ in new location on campus

KU Victory Eagle

For the third — and likely final — time, the University of Kansas on Monday dedicated “The Victory Eagle” statue in honor of the Douglas County residents who lost their lives fighting in World War I. “Monuments like this ‘Victory Eagle,’ commissioned to honor those from Douglas County who answered their country’s call, makes this world history our local history,” said Lorie Vanchena, who is a KU associate professor of German Studies. “Eighteen of the 68 individuals whose names appear on the plaque were KU students and alumni. So this monument makes this world history our university history.” Click here to read more about the many flights on the Victory' Eagle's journey to a permanent place of honor at KU.


St. Louis threw a homecoming party for the ages in 1919 for the 138th Infantry

St. Louis Parade 1919

St. Louis' own 138th Infantry Regiment returned from World War I with a parade through the city on May 9, 1919. Coinciding with  the first meeting on American soil of the veterans of World War I who created the American Legion, the massive celebration included the 138th's soldiers marched through cheering mobs, via pillars erected by the city to make 12th Street a "hall of honor" for the veterans returning from the Great War. Click here to read more about the big celebration for which the 138th had paid dearly in WWI.


Through her eyes: Exhibit offers glimpse of WWI through Hatfield woman's diaries

Marian C. Billings

Around a century ago, Marian C. Billings left her family’s tobacco farm on Main Street in Hatfield, MA at the age of 37 to join the Red Cross as a canteen worker during World War I. Of the 103 people from Hatfield who enlisted to serve in “the war to end all wars,” she was the only woman. A new exhibit curated by the Hatfield Historical Society shares stories of Billings’ time nursing and feeding soldiers from 1918-1919 in France, as well as presenting stories pieced together about the town’s WWI soldiers. Click here to read more about this remarkable exhibit.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Living History Crew from the USS Olympia at Fleet Week New York 2019

USS Olympia Living History

In May 17th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 123, host Theo Mayer interviewed Kevin Smith and Laura Adie of the Cruiser Olympia Living History Crew. Kevin and Laura both attended Fleet Week in NYC to share World War I Naval History with visitors. Click here to read on and learn more about the work of the Living History Crew, the story of the Olympia, and more. 

Education: Teacher Suzan Turner and her Award-Winning Students 

National History Day logo

In May 3rd's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 121, host Theo Mayer interviewed Suzan Turner and a few of her students from Nashau, Iowa. Suzan's students produced an award-winning documentary for Who They Were, a National History Day program that encourages students to engage with World War I. The students received the Loren Horton Award for Local History, and were honored by the Governor of Iowa for having the outstanding youth project in local history in the State this year. Click here to read the transcript of an absorbing interview with some remarkable young students of World War I.

The Curtiss NC-4 and the First Transatlantic Flight 

Glenn Curtiss

In May 10th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 122, host Theo Mayer recounted the story of the first transatlantic flight. American Navy pilots flying a Curtiss NC-4 made several stops on a trip that ultimately took several weeks before landing in Lisbon, Portugal. It was harrowing journey that marked a major achievement for the Navy, the nascent aerospace industry, and the United States as a whole. Click here to read the transcript of this enthralling podcast about aviation history.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

map of ottoman empire

Episode #124
Highlights:The Imperial Hubris of Mandates

Host - Theo Mayer

100 Years ago: The Imperial Hubris of Mandates -
Host | @ 01:55

The Fate of The Ottoman Empire -
Mike Shuster | @ 09:45

War Memoirs From WWI: “Edmund Blunden”  -
Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 13:55

Commission News: Fleet Week Update -
Host | @ 19:45

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence -
Dr. Kate Clark-Lemay | @ 21:10

Erie County WWI Remembrance -  
Mary Jane Koenig | @ 28:40

Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch -
Host | @ 34:35


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

How to Remember Your Ancestor's Names

By Drew Pham

When WWrite asked veteran The Wrath-Bearing Tree editor, Drew Pham to contribute a post, he composed a poem that traces his Vietnamese heritage by looking at WWI and beyond using experimental techniques with language and style.

Pham, who was sent to Afghanistan with the 10th Mountain Division, has published fictional and non-fictional work in Time Magazine, The Daily Beast, Foreign Policy, Columbia Journal, and The Brooklyn Review. Read Pham's innovative poem "How to Remember Your Ancestor's Names" at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

For many Americans who fought in the First World War, their journey on a military transport ship was highly memorable: it was the first time they’d ever left the country.

Pittsburgh native Frank L. Armstrong wrote the comic verse “Going Over”; it uses humor to cope with the disconcerting strangeness of crossing an ocean for war service.


Doughboy MIA for week of 5/27

James G. Mason

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is PFC James G. Mason. Born 10 December 1897 in Dublin, Georgia, James Griffing Mason was the son of James D. and Cassie G. Mason, the youngest of three children. He was one of the first from Dublin to enlist in the ‘Macon Volunteers’ for Border service on 20 June, 1916 into Company B, 2nd Georgia National Guard. Upon the unit’s return following the US declaration of war, they were sent to the newly formed Camp Gordon to be federalized in August, 1917 as Company B of the 151st Machine Gun Battalion, 42nd ‘Rainbow’ Division. A conscientious and popular soldier, Private Mason was soon promoted to Private First Class. The 42nd went to France in November, 1917 and was in the thick of it almost from the beginning, eventually seeing 264 days of combat.

It was on 29 July, 1918, that PFC Mason was killed in action near Villers Sur Fere (Sergy) during the drive from Chateau Thierry to the Vesle River. He was 20 years old. While little is known of his case at this time, there is evidence that the temporary cemetery he was buried in contained several bodies buried without markers. PFC Mason may have been one.

                There is a private memorial to him in a family cemetery at Dublin, Georgia, and a military provided marker at Detrick Cemetery at Shenandoah County, Virginia.             

Want to help shed some light on PFC Mason’s case? Consider making a donation to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. It takes only a moment and your tax deductible contribution can be as large as you want or as small as $10.00 on our ‘Ten for Them’ program. Your contribution helps us make a full accounting of all 4,423 US MIA’s from WW1 and keeps these lost men from being forgotten.  Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.

Remember: A man is only missing if he is forgotten.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Commemorative Hat

Commemorative Doughboy Hat

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA hat. The poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. The Navy hat with white Doughboy embroidery is a 100% cotton, structured with contrasting pancake visor, sweatband and taping, and pre-curved bill. The velcro closure features U.S. flag emblem. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. Order your Doughboy Commemorative hat here.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  Proceeds from the Official WWI Centennial Merchandise help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.



Frank J. Dunleavy

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Frank J. Dunleavy

 

Submitted by: Ellen Kazimer {Granddaughter}

Frank J. Dunleavy was born around 1889. Frank Dunleavy served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

My grandfather, Frank J. Dunleavy, was drafted in April of 1918. He was 29, and by the time he arrived at the front, the war was over. French soldiers informed him, but he didn’t believe it until he reported to the front.

Frank Dunleavy worked in the Central Records Office in Bourges, France compiling the service records of every soldier in the American Expeditionary Forces. For six months there were 6000 soldiers and five to six hundred women from Great Britain’s auxiliary army corps working in the records office.

My grandfather sent an amusing letter to his family detailing a week of leave touring the Rivera on seven dollars. He slept on the baggage rack of the train, went to a dance where he said the French danced fairly good, toured museums, and watched Charlie Chaplin at the movies.

Read Frank J. Dunleavy's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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May 21, 2019

Fleet Week New York 2019

Commission activities honor America's World War I Vets during Fleet Week 2019

UPDATED Navy Centennial Logo

The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, in partnership with the U.S. Navy, will host a number of cultural activities, and commemorative events, during the U.S. Navy's upcoming Fleet Week New York, from 22-27 May 2019. A full list of the WWI-related activities can be found at ww1cc.org/fleetweek. These events will help tell the story of the 4 million American men and women -- many from the greater New York area -- who stepped forward to serve during World War I, 100 years ago. Click here to read more about the World War I -related activities taking place during Fleet Week 2019 this week.

369th Experience

The 369th Experience Band, sponsored by the Centennial Commission, will be making several appearances during Fleet Week, including at Rockefeller Center on Saturday, May 25; at Liberty State Park in Jersey City on Sunday, May 26; and leading the the annual Memorial Day Parade in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn on Monday, May 27. Click here to find out more details and times for these performances by the fabulous 369th Experience.

Stubby AKC clip

In the run-up to Fleet Week in New York City this week, The American Kennel Club's Museum of the Dog will unveil the official bronze statue of Sgt. Stubby, a distinguished World War I war dog, which will be housed permanently at the AKC Museum of the Dog. The sculpture will be unveiled on May 23. Commissioner Dr. Libby O'Connell of the United States World War I Centennial Commission will perform the unveiling.  Click here to read more about the sculpture, the sculptor, and how Stubby earned his recognition at the Museum of the Dog.


Fall start envisioned for WWI tribute; concept for monument in D.C.‘really coming along,’ says Arkansas designer 

Memorial Detail 5192019 Arkansas Gazette

The Arkansas Democrat Gazette newspaper this week published an update on the progress of the National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. The article noted that "supporters of the new World War I Memorial say they’re hopeful they can break ground this fall." “We’re getting close to wrapping up the design. We’re about 75% of the way through,” said Joseph Weishaar, the project’s architect and a Fayetteville native. “It’s really coming along.” Click here to read the entire article in the Arkansas Democrat Gazette newspaper.


In search of Roman’s ‘lost boys’ of WWI

Wolfe

Roman Catholic High School in Philadelphia, PA was founded by Irish immigrant Thomas Cahill in 1890, and was the first free Catholic high school in the country. By the time the United States had entered World War I in 1917, the school was already more than a quarter-century old. Yet many alumni, including writer Chris Gibbons, had long assumed that there was no commemorative plaque for World War I because no Roman alumni had died in that war. However, as Gibbon's interest and knowledge of the Great War deepened over the years, he began to doubt this assumption. After he read James Nelson's book The Remains of Company D, Gibbons resolved to finally learn the truth regarding World War I and the lost boys from Roman. Click here to read how this search unfolded, and how the names of the lost boys of Roman are being rediscovered and honored 100 years after the end of World War I.


Filmmaker Daniel Bernardi and his historical documentary series for the National Cemetery Administration

Daniel Bernardi

Daniel Bernardi is a remarkable young filmmaker, and a very busy person. He is a Navy Reservist, a professor of film at San Francisco State University, and he manages a film production company specializing in documentaries. Daniel's current project, as a filmmaker, is a series of pieces for the National Cemetery Administration (NCA), which manages the nation's veteran cemeteries across the United States. These National Cemeteries are amazing historical sites, and are home some of America's greatest military heroes. -- In fact -- The Centennial Commission worked with the NCA for the Wreath Laying Ceremony for World War I heroes buried in NYC's Cypress Hills National Cemetery on May 2nd. Daniel's biggest film of this series, the WWI-themed WAR TO END ALL WARS, premiered recently at the National World War I Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, and will be screened there during Memorial Day Weekend. Much of the new video work done by Daniel and his team can be found on their YouTube channel. Recently we took some time to talk to Daniel about his work, and hear his thoughts on why these stories are important; click here to read the entire interview.


Indiana exhibit to highlight World War I veterans' shrine rededication

Indiana exhibit snip

An exhibit chronicling World War I will be one highlight of this year's Memorial Day weekend rededication of Fort Wayne's Veterans National Memorial Shrine and Museum in Indiana. The Shrine is a recipient of a 100 Cities/100 Memorials grant. Info on the restoration project for this memorial can be found here. 100 Cities/100 Memorials is a joint program of the United States World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library. Click here to read more about the Shrine and the "The Great War: From Ration Lines to the Front Lines" traveling exhibit curated by the Indiana Historical Society.


Gone but no longer forgotten: At long last, these four World War I veterans receive a memorial service

No Longer forgotten

The cremated remains of four World War I veterans were transported in a horse-drawn carriage, accompanied by Patriot Guard Riders and a police escort, to their final resting place at the Roseburg National Cemetery Annex in Douglas County, Oregon last week. The veterans’ remains were forgotten on a shelf at a local mortuary before being rediscovered through the painstaking research of Douglas County Veterans Forum member Carol Hunt and retired Roseburg National Cemetery technician Gigi Grimes Shannon. What the two women found was one of the largest groups of unclaimed veterans remains ever to have been recovered in the state. Click here to read this extraordinary story of a dogged pursuit for justice for these four World War I veterans.


Fort Des Moines exhibit honors African-American men who served in WWI

Des Moines

Over a century ago, the first African-American officers trained at Fort Des Moines. On May 4, local members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity unveiled a display honoring members who received their commissions there in 1917 and served during World War I. The Fort Des Moines training camp was the first and only established for African-American officers and non-commissioned candidates. What began as a simple question  — "Did Phi Beta Sigma have any members who were commissioned here" — turned into a three-year project that uncovered 20 men from the fraternity who served in WWI, including nine who received their commissions at Fort Des Moines. Click here to read the entire story about the search, the ceremony, and what the fraternity learned about its World War I heritage as a result.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Events:
Richard "Corky" Erie and Beth Baker
on Fleet Week 2019 in NYC 

Fleet Week 2019 logo

In May 10th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 121, host Theo Mayer interviewed Richard "Corky" Erie and Beth Baker about Fleet Week New York. Richard is the director of Fleet Week New York, and Beth is the Director of Public Affairs for the Navy in the Mid-Atlantic and Fleet Week New York. The two of them have plenty to say about the logistics, scale, operation, and impact of Fleet Week on the city- as well as how this year's event incorporates World War I. Click here to read the entire interview, and get an inside look at what it takes to bring "12 to 14 Navy and Coast Guard ships carrying upwards of 2,600 Sailors, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen to all five boroughs of New York City, executing over 130 events in six days."

Centennial News Now:
Tom Frezza on the USS Recruit 

Tom Frezza

In May 3rd's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 121, host Theo Mayer interviewed Tom Frezza, Director of Education at the National Museum of the US Navy. Mr. Frezza spoke in-depth about the USS Recruit, a full-scale battleship replica built in New York City in 1917 to encourage people to join the Navy -- and they were able to recruit over 25,000 men into service! Click here to read the entire story about the great wooden "land ship" that sent sailors all over the planet while never leaving Manhattan.

100 Years Ago This Week: The Tragic Death of James Reese Europe

James Reese Europe

In May 3rd's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 121, host Theo Mayer reviewed some of the most important headlines from this week, 100 years ago. Among them was the death of James Reese Europe, the legendary African American band leader of the 369th Infantry Band. Already famous as an innovator and an advocate for Black musicians in New York, he's often credited for bringing Jazz to France with the 369th.  He was tragically murdered in an altercation with a bandmate. Click here to read the contemporary story of the death of a military and musical legend 100 years ago.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Hello Girls Cast Album

Episode #123
Highlights: Remembering WWI Veterans

Host: Theo Mayer

Germany Agrees to Sign Peace Treaty - Mike Shuster | @ 02:15

100 Years Ago: The Treaty and the League as Viewed in America - Host | @ 06:50

War Memoirs From WWI: “Will Bird”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 13:10

Back Over There: Italian Immigrants Serving in WWI - Luca Angeli | @ 18:50

Fleet Week New York 2019: The Site, the Events and the Social Media - Host | @ 27:15

Living Historians from the Cutter Olympia - Laura Adie & Kevin Smith | @ 28:10

“The Hello Girls Musical” Releases Cast Album - Cara Reichel, Peter Mills & Ben Moss | @ 37:15

Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | @ 46:50


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Waking Up to History: John Dos Passos, the Cut-up, and World War I

By M.C. Armstrong

When M.C. Armstrong traveled to Iraq as a war reporter, he took with him the work of WWI volunteer ambulance driver and American novelist, John Dos Passos. Like Dos Passos did in 1919, Armstrong came back and began to assert his own theory of war writing based on lessons learned.

In this post, Armstrong analyzes language as a weapon in war through the ways Dos Passos criticizes journalism using fiction. Read Waking Up to History: John Dos Passos, the Cut-up, and World War I, which discusses the war propaganda machine and Dos Passos' signature "cut up" technique at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

Over 1.7 million American doughboys were sent to Europe to serve in the First World War.

Read one soldier’s account of the loneliness men felt on over-crowded ships as they headed towards the Great War. The writer, John Allan Wyeth, is considered one of the finest American combat poets of the war.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Lest We Forget jacket

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library 

As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the Unites States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned ― including posters from nations involved in the conflict ― and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. It serves as a lasting reminder that our world ignores the history of World War I (and the ensuing WWII) at its peril ― lest we forget.  Proceeds help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


John A. Dean

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

John A Dean

 

Submitted by: Elmer J Bott, Jr. {Legion Post Adjutant}

John A Dean born around 1893, John Dean served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

Story of Service

 

John A. Dean was born about 1893, his mother Anna (Kelly) Dean and William Dean were residents of Butler.

John A. Dean enlisted August 31, 1917 in the Ambulance Co #33, which trained at the Van Wyck estate bordering on Lake Apshawa. He then traveled to Syracuse, New York, Allentown, Pennsylvania and lastly Camp Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina for further training.

At Camp Greene his company was incorporated into the 4th Division Regular Army. They left the United States for service overseas on May 13, 1918. In whole or part he served at Belleau Wood, Chateau Thierry, and the Aisne-Marne offensive, St. Mihiel, the Meuse Argonne in France and in the Army of Occupation in Germany.

Read John A. Dean's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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May 14, 2019

National Football League donates
$1 million for National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. 

NFL logo

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission announced today that the National Football League (NFL) has contributed $1 million to the construction of the first-ever National World War I Memorial in Washington D.C. The NFL is now one of the lead donors to the Memorial, along with  the Pritzker Military Museum and Library, the Starr Foundation, General Motors, FedEx, Walmart, the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, the Lounsbery Foundation, and several other corporations and foundations. Click here to read more about the NFL's generous donation to help "provide a site that will tell the world of the sacrifices these men and women made for our liberty a century ago."


WWI Centennial Commission announces Fleet Week New York 2019 Events

UPDATED Navy Centennial Logo

The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, in partnership with the U.S. Navy, will host a number of cultural activities, and commemorative events, during the U.S. Navy's upcoming Fleet Week New York, from 22-27 May 2019. These activities will help tell the story of the 4 million American men and women, many from the greater New York area, who stepped forward to serve during World War I, 100 years ago. Click here to read more about the schedule of World War I related activities taking place during Fleet Week.

As part of the Fleet Week activities, there will be special performances by the 369th Experience Band at Liberty State Park in New Jersey on Monday, May 27. The band is made up of musicians from a collection of Historically Black Colleges and Universities that pay homage to the contributions of African-Americans and Puerto Ricans in World War I through the eyes of the 369th U.S. Infantry Regiment, also known as James Reese Europe’s “Harlem Hellfighters.” Click here to read more about all the events in Liberty State Park, including a certified 5K Run.


Memorial Day Weekend Events Honor Nation’s Heroes at the National WWI Museum and Memorial in Kansas City

NWWIM&M with flags

As the commemoration of the Centennial of World War I (2014-19) continues, the National WWI Museum and Memorial serves as a fitting place to honor and recognize the men and women who sacrificed their lives while serving their country during Memorial Day weekend. Admission to the Museum and Memorial is free for veterans and active duty military personnel, while general admission for the public is half-price all weekend (Friday-Monday, May 24-27). The Museum and Memorial offers a wide variety of events during the weekend for people of all ages.Click here to read about the entire great schedule of Memorial Day activities.


AKC Museum of the Dog honors Army's Sgt. Stubby, celebrated WWI service dog

Stubby

He was the "goodest boy" of them all. As one of the first U.S. Army service dogs, bull terrier mix Sgt. Stubby endured mustard gas and shrapnel from grenades during his time in World War I France. The long-treasured mascot's bravery and service will be honored with an unveiling of a bronze statue in his likeness at the AKC Museum of the Dog in Manhattan on May 23, where it will be housed permanently. Click here to read more about the ceremony, and why Gen. John J. Pershing awarded the four-legged fighter a medal for his bravery.


Teacher to eulogize WWI soldier from Wild Rose, Wisconsin who died in 1918

Joseph Nowinski

Pvt. Sylvester Mushinski was married and the father of three children when he died during World War I. He was a farm boy who grew up in Wild Rose, moved to the Chicago area and then enlisted in the Army in June 1917, then became one of the 116,516 Americans who died in military service during the war. Now, a century after Mushinski's death, an Almond-Bancroft High School social studies teacher Joseph Nowinski will deliver the soldier's eulogy in France, as part of a program offered through National History Day and sponsored by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum & Library. Click here to read more about educational journey that Nowinski and 18 other teachers will take to France in June to pay homage to the heroes who died in the war.


Remarkable photos of African-American soldiers who fought bravely shoulder-to-shoulder with white comrades in WWI

369th

The Daily Mail newspaper in the UK has published what it terms "Incredible images from the end of the First World War show brave African-American soldiers as they keep up morale in France – and the infamous Harlem Hellfighters as they return to New York after 191 days at war. The remarkable shots, which were taken in around 1918, depict a proud father holding up eleven stars, one for each of his sons serving; a soldier entertaining his comrades in Orleans, France; and rapturous crowds welcoming the Harlem Hellfighters home." Click here to read more about the 369th, and view the remarkable collection of photographs chronicling their World War I service.


Belongings of Burlington WWI soldier return to American Legion Post 273

Leonard Millican bible

When Claire Lohr was in her 30s and helping her grandmother, Mildred Parker McAleer, clean out her Washington, D.C., home, she rummaged through many items that had familiar names of family members she knew. But there was one item, a leather military Bible, that caught her eye. She opened it and saw a name scribbled inside. “Who’s Leonard Millican?” she asked her grandmother. Click here to read the unexpected World War I story that her grandmother's answer to the question provided about a Burlington hero in the Great War.


Iowa's WWI 'Soldiers in White' honored with special ceremony at State Capitol

Iowa nurses memorial

On May 5, Iowa's 'Soldiers in White' were honored again, with a special tribute to the women who served during the Great War. A new bronze plaque was dedicated to those nurses next to the World War II Memorial at the State Capitol. The original dedication ceremony to those soldiers was held in 1921. At the time, 10 birch trees were planted near this spot to honor them. Those trees have since been replaced with white oaks, but the bronze plaque is meant to be a lasting symbol for generations to come.  Click here to read more about the ceremony and the new, permanent memorial to the nurses for their service in World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

100 Years in the Making:
National Memorial Lead Designer
Joe Weishaar

Joe Weishaar

In April 26th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 120, host Theo Mayer spoke with Joe Weishaar, the lead designer of the National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. Joe has been dedicated to bringing the memorial to fruition for nearly four years, from the design competition up through the present day. In the interview, Joe catches us up on the status of the memorial as it goes through both the design and regulatory processes. Click here to read a transcript of the program, and learn where the Memorial's progress stands now.

Animals in World War I with Leah Tams

Slug

In April 26th's edition of the World War I Centennial News Podcast, Episode 120, host Theo Mayer interviewed Leah Tams, a Program Associate based at the University of Mary Washington in Virginia, about a very interesting animal contributor to the American war effort. We've all heard about dogs like Sgt. Stubby, and horses, and many mascot animals. But click here to read the transcript of the entire program to find out how even invertebrates played important roles as the Americans slugged it out with the Germans in WWI.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo New

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

US Navy NC-4 arrives in Lisbon Portugal

Ep. #122
Highlights:US Navy
NC-4, first to fly Atlantic

Host - Theo Mayer

100 years Ago: US Navy NC-4, first to fly Atlantic - Host | 02:06

Ultimatum to Germany: Sign or face renewed war - Mike Shuster | 16:35

War Memoirs from WWI: “Hervey Allen”  -
Dr. Edward Lengel | 29:35

FREE WWI Genealogy Research Guide -
Host | 26:00

Fleet Week New York 2019 -
“Corky” Erie and Beth Baker | 27:25

Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch -
Host | 39:30


Literature in WWI This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

The Debt of WWII Resistance Fighters to WWI Veterans

Part 4. Marc Bloch, a History Lesson

By Jennifer Orth-Veillon

On June 16, 1944, ten days after the Americans landed in Normandy on D-Day, the Gestapo massacred 29 French Resisters. Among them was Marc Bloch, one of the world's most important historians.

This was not the first time Bloch, a Jew from Alsace and Professor at the Sorbonne, had taken up arms against the Germans.

In this post, WWrite Curator Jennifer Orth-Veillon discusses Bloch's incredible trajectory from Legion of Honor WWI leader to WWII French Resistance hero.

Read about Bloch and the ways in which WWI shaped his pathbreaking approach to history at WWrite this week!

Behind Their Lines

behind their lines

In 1914, America’s Poetry magazine sponsored a “War Poetry Competition.”

The magazine received over 700 entries and selected 14 poems to be published.

Read one of the winning poems ­—Alice Corbin Henderson’s “Fallen”—and learn more about America’s early response to the war in this post on Behind Their Lines.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Memorial flag on grass

8" X 12" WWI flags for Memorial Day

The WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 8 inches x 12 inches.  It sports the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and is secured on a 15.75" wooden dowel with a decorative ball on top .  

It also features "Double Honors", because a portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for the America's National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park, in Washington DC.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Sanco Thompson, Sr.

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Sanco Thompson, Sr.

 

Submitted by: Sonya R. Grantham {Granddaughter}

Sanco Thompson, Sr. served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

 

My grandfather Sanco Thompson, Sr. from Columbia, South Carolina. He was a member of the 371st Infantry Regiment 93rd Division Colored, WWI and I have found service records for the 369th Harlem Hell Fighters.

My grandfather is buried in the Childs Cemetery in Richland County, South Carolina. The cemetery is located on the grounds of a former manufacturing plant. The site was also the former Wade Hampton Plantation. The Llysander D. Child's purchased the plantation during the Reconstruction Era.

I have restored and documented people that are buried in the cemetery-for nine and have for years - solo. I'm proud to be the granddaughter of a WWI Soldier.

Read Sanco Thompson, Sr.'s entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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