The pilots African American Officers Mule Rearing doughboys with mules pilots in dress uniforms Riveters African American Soldiers 1 gas masks

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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April 10, 2018

Final fifty “WWI Centennial Memorials” announced in wrap-up of competition phase of 100 Cities / 100 Memorials 

100 Cities 150

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library announced the final 50 WW1 Memorials to be awarded grants and honored with the official national designation as "WW1 Centennial Memorials". Now the 100 selected memorial, which each will receive a $2,000 matching grant, towards the restoration, conservation and maintenance of these local historical treasures, are hard at work on bringing their respective memorials up to top condition.  Read more about the final fifty selectees, and where 100 Cities / 100 Memorials goes from here.

Memorial Hunters Club

While the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials competition is over, the job of finding and cataloging all of the thousands of World War I Memorials in the United States continues. The Commission' s Memorial Hunters Club program is designed to create a catalog of the WWI memorials around the entire country, so we can be aware of them, and help preserve them. WW1CC Intern Betsy Sheppard walks us through this great program, and shows how you can get involved here. 


"The film needed really really brilliant nuanced, convincing performances"

Journey's End

The movie Journey’s End opened widely across the U.S. in April. Journey’s End tells the story of Captain Stanhope and his British regiment during World War I. The regiment of about 120 soldiers goes back to a front line with knowledge of an enormous upcoming attack and the knowledge that they will likely be on the front to face it. The film portrays how these men waited as time tick by until the attack and the ways in which each of these individuals deals with their fear. The World War I Centennial Commission had a chance to interview director Saul Dibb on our weekly WW1 Centennial News podcast a few weeks ago about his vision for the film. Read the entire interview here.


"It was a sad but poignant tale."

Hartley

Lifelong friends Ed Nef and Doug Hartley, are both 84 years young, and they recently undertook a remarkable project -- to create a documentary film about Doug's uncle, Charles Fletcher Hartley. One hundred years ago, Charles Fletcher Hartley was an American living overseas, who left a comfortable life in order to join the British Army. He served in the trenches as an infantry officer with the famous Coldstream Guards. The film, An American Martyr, is a remarkable finished project. We caught up with Ed and Doug recently to find out more about their movie.


Pennsylvania oil and World War I

Pennsylvania Oil

A new scholarly journal tackles a dual subject - Pennsylvania oil and World War I - and outlines how the two topics were closely intertwined.  The special Oilfield Journal edition, timed to mark the 100th anniversary of America's entry into the War to End All Wars, lays out "the impact of the global war on the local region." Petroleum products, from lubricants to gasoline, played a crucial role in World War I, and nowhere was that impact more dramatic than in Pennsylvania's oil patch. Read more about the surprising connections between Pennsylvania oil and World War I here.


One Hundred Years Ago: New York City Bids Farewell to the Doughboys

77th Division soldiers

By the time German forces launched Operation Michael on the Western Front on March 21, 1918, only six full American divisions had arrived in France. Desperate to ramp up the American contribution as fast as possible, AEF Commander General John J. Pershing and French Generalissimo Ferdinand Foch agreed to increase the tempo of troop shipments across the Atlantic Ocean. It was time to send in the draftees of the so-called. The first of these divisions departed New York City one hundred years ago: the 77th “Metropolitans” and the 82nd “All-Americans”. Read more about the impact these two New York units had when they arrived "Over There" in 1918.


'Over Here' in Michigan, High School Athletes Gave to World War I Effort

Boys working Reserve

The Boys’ Working Reserve, a branch of the U.S. Department of Labor, was organized in the spring of 1917 and designed to tap into an underutilized resource to help address that labor deficiency. “Its object was the organization of the boy-power of the nation for work on the farms during the school vacation months.” In 1918, the the Michigan Interscholastic Athletic Association was grappling with the effects the war was having on the state and the nation, and in particular, on Michigan high school sports. Read more about how the conflicting priorities and competing equities were balanced, and how “the boys who last spring left their high school studies and as members of the United States Boys’ Reserve have helped the Michigan division to add $7,000,000 to the food production of the nation.”


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. NEW Now listen on Spotify.

Join the Army Air Service

Episode #66
Highlights: April 1918 Preview

April 1918 Preview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel & Katherine Akey | @ 02:50
Spring Offensive on Easter - Mike Shuster | @ 14:50
War in The Sky - Pilots and PTSD - Mark Wilkins | @ 18:30
Basketball in WWI - Dr. Lindsay Krasnoff | @ 27:05
100 Cities / 100 Memorials - Round#2 awardees announced | @ 32:50
Speaking WWI - “over the top” | @ 36:05
WWI War Tech - The Paris Guns | @ 37:15
Dispatch 4/3/18 highlights | @ 39:20
Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 41:00


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Break of Day - Poet Isaac Rosenberg

“Dawn has never recovered from what the Great War did to it,” writes Paul Fussell in The Great War and Modern Memory. This week's post explores the unprecedented notions of dawn in the WWI poetry of British soldier, Isaac Rosenberg, who died on Easter Sunday, 1918. Dawn, an almost-universal symbol for renewal, became one of the most painful times of day for soldiers in the trenches because it revealed the reality of the nightmares that battle brought them in the dark. Don't miss this post on one of the most important, prolific poets of the Great War, Isaac Rosenberg.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Army Blanket

Woolen U.S. Army Blanket

Keep warm while showing your American pride with this classic green woolen U.S. Army blanket.

Still proudly Made in the USA by Woolrich, Inc., the oldest continuously operating woolen mill in the United States since 1830, the blankets were originally purchased by the U.S. military to supply our troops. Designed to be used by soldiers in the barracks, this Limited Edition blanket features a heat-marked “U.S.” emblem on the center and an exclusive fabric garment label commemorating the U.S. centennial of World War One. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item will help fund the National WW1 Memorial in Washington, D.C. Fabrics and Features: 66”W x 84” L; 24 oz. 65% wool/35% recycled wool. Overseamed at all four sides. Made in USA.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Donald Chapman

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Donald Chapman


Submitted by:
Tish Wells {grand-niece}

 

Donald Chapman born around 1889, Donald Chapman served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

The story of Donald Chapman

In November 1917, Donald Chapman, 28, wrote to his mother, Ella, living in Ithaca, New York, “I have not been called yet.” He was a prolific letter writer to his sister, Mildred, and his mother. 

He had expected to be drafted at any time. The Selective Service Act had been enacted on May 18th, 1917. 

In the meantime, he was working with automobiles in Detroit, Michigan, and thinking ahead. “If I do not have to go to war,” he wrote, “I can make a lot of money in the spring. Second-hand cars will sell like hotcakes, as they are cutting down on the output of new ones.”

On December 15, he’d taken advantage of an “opportunity to enlist at my trade as auto mechanic… in the Ordinance Dep.” of the Third Division.

Read Donald Chapman's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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April 3, 2018 

Pershing leads 1918 DC Parade

How the World War I could reign in President Trump’s Veterans Day parade

Veterans Day 2018, the weekend selected for President Trump’s military parade, is the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended the First World War on Nov. 11, 1918. That’s the conflict that gave birth to the national veterans' holiday and planted seeds for many of the global convulsions that have erupted since. In an extensive article, Politico magazine writes about how the timing of the parade will bestow special honor on the Americans who sacrificed in World War I, including nearly 117,000 who were killed and another 204,000 wounded. In the 1919 photo above, General of the Armies John J. Pershing led the "Welcome Home" parade for U.S. armed forces personnel down Pennsylvania Ave in Washington, DC. Will those who served be recognized again in the nation's capital to commemorate the centennial of the end of World War I? Read the entire article here, with  quotes from the Commission's Vice Chair Edwin Fountain.


Animated film 'Sgt Stubby' pays homage to America's World War I canine hero

Sgt Stubby Poster

“Sgt Stubby: An American Hero” opens nationwide on April 13, 2018. The film, endorsed by the United States World War One Centennial Commission, is getting rave reviews from premiere screenings, and is putting the spotlight on efforts to memorialize the film's title character in its home state. The computer-animated biographical family adventure war drama film centers on Sergeant Stubby, a stray Boston Terrier who eventually becomes a hero during World War I for his keen instincts and fierce loyalty, and is still recognized as the most decorated canine in American history.  To hear how kids responded to the preview premiere of “Sgt Stubby: An American Hero” check out the March 30 edition of the WW1 Centennial News Podcast here.

Man and Mutt

Stubby's home town of Hartford, CT is holding a street fair on April 8 in Stubby’s honor, featuring a World War I-era ambulance, a 1916 Model T Ford, a 1914 French Renault tank, historical re-enactors, National Guard working dogs doing demonstrations and modern military equipment. It was in New Haven where the men of Connecticut’s 102nd Infantry Regiment, 26th division, were training on Yale Field. During the drills and exercises, a dock-tailed puppy wandered onto the field and took a liking to one soldier in particular, Robert Conroy,  who named his newfound friend Stubby, after the pup’s stubby tail. Conroy became so attached to Stubby that when the 102nd shipped out to Europe a few weeks later, he smuggled the pup onto the troop ship, concealing him in a long field coat and hiding him in the coal hold. Thus, a legend was born. Read more about how Hartford is commemorating the man, the dog, and their legend here.

Stubby statue drawing

In Middleton, CT,  the city’s tranquil park that honors 65 Connecticut heroes who lost their lives in service to the country will soon include a tribute to a very special service dog. Some 25 people gathered recently at Veterans Memorial Park to reveal plans for a bronze statue to be erected this spring in the entrance way area of the Connecticut Trees of Honor to memorialize Sgt. Stubby. It took more than 30 years for the Deane family find the perfect resting place for America’s best-known military working dog,   “It really is a fulfillment of promise I made to my grandfather back in the ‘80s," said Curt Deane, grandson of Robert Conroy. "When I realized it was the centennial (of the U.S. involvement in World War I), it was the right time to do it.” Read more here about the bronze memorial that will join tributes other Connecticut heroes.


NARA sets WWI Quiz & Research Portals

NARA logo

 

Test your knowledge about the role of the United States in the First World War!   The U.S. National Archives recently created a new WWI quiz for the public. The 15 questions cover U.S. involvement, the battles fought, and how the public kept up the war effort on the home front.  The National Archives also recently created a pair of remarkable portals of WWI resources and research aids. They include some rare unusual items, like digitized imagery & celebrity draft cards.These great portals can be found here:  https://www.archives.gov/research/military/ww1  -and- https://www.archives.gov/research/alic/reference/military/ww1


Free WWI Battlefield Travel Guide

Guide cover

Ronald Snip is the author of a new illustrated travel guide about World War I, which describes the area between the city Reims (Marne) to Saint-Mihiel (Meuse) as well as Moselle and Haut-Rhin. It is the only up-to-date, English travel guide that clearly describes the remnants of the First World War in these regions. Each topic covers two pages, with the GPS coordinates, address, location information and a detailed map in addition to images of the location, as well as a web page where additional information can be found. Find out more about this free guide to WWI battlefields here.


Nation's largest WWI Public Reenactment at Midway Village Museum April 7-8

Midway Village Museum logo clip

Midway Village Museum will host the 6th annual Great War event, a WWI military event that features over 225 re-enactors portraying soldiers and civilians from the United States and Europe in the museum’s historic village. Visitors engage in this unique historic, immersive experience with the opportunity to enter encampments, tour a reproduction 150 yard trench system, and watch large-scale narrated battle reenactments. For a complete listing of scheduled activities, log onto www.midwayvillage.com.


'Side by Side' - the American World War I war effort remembered in Great Britain

UK exhibit

A new exhibition marking the centenary of the United States’ role in the Great War is opening this week at the American Museum in Bath. 'Side by Side: America and World War I' seeks to tell the stories of ordinary Americans as the country joined the conflict in Europe. Centenarynews.com reporter Patrick Gregory reports on the exhibition that is presenting a snapshot of the country and its people at the beginning of what was to become the American Century. Read more about the exhibit here.


"Our beaches will blow you away!" Deadly WWI legacies on the Jersey shore

New Jersey artifacts of WWI

A century after World War I ended, discarded munitions from that and other wars continue to make their way onto beaches around the country.Items ranging from tiny fuses to full-scale mines are displaced by beach replenishment projects, sucked from the ocean floor and pumped ashore, or by strong storms that uncover them. The most recent discovery came in March 2018 when seven WWI rifle grenades were found on the beach in Mantoloking, New Jersey, which is undergoing a beach replenishment project to undo damage from Superstorm Sandy more than five years ago. Read more about how these grim reminders of the Great War still end up on the beaches of New Jersey and other states 100 years after the war's end.


Easter 1918 was bittersweet in WWI

 

Easter 1918

Easter Sunday, March 31, 1918, was a bittersweet observance, full of dark humor and gas masks on the front lines of World War I. Soldiers couldn’t help but compare their lives before the war and their current circumstances on the battlefield in a combination of hope and dread. Writing in the Temple Daily Telegram in Temple, TX, reporter Patricia Benoit gathers an assortment of reflections by American soldiers on the French battlefront on the occasion of Easter 1918, and the impending great battles. Read the thoughtful compilation here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand. NEW Now listen on Spotify.

Draftees Ship Out

Episode #65
Highlights: Draftees Ship Out! 

Update on the Spring Offensive - Mike Shuster | @02:25

America Emerges: The Draftees Ship Out - Edward Lengel | @06:20

Don’t send the boys “Dainties” by parcel post! | @11:40

Remembering Veterans: The Women’s Overseas Service League - Cathleen Cordova | @16:45

Updates from the States: Idaho Commission - K.C.Piccard and Frank Krone | @21:55

Spotlight in the Media: Sgt. Stubby Premiere | @27:35

100C/100M: Glen Carbon IL - Linda Sinco | @32:45

100C/100M: Appleton, WI - Alexander Schultz | @38:35

Speaking WW1: Tommy | @44:45

WW1 War Tech: The Little Curie | @46:20

The Dispatch Newsletter | @48:05 

The Buzz - The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:25


Doughboy MIA for week of April 2

Ketterman, William

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Edwin C. Kitterman of New Middletown, Indiana. He entered the army in September, 1917, and went to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training. Following his training, he was sent to Company K/120th Infantry/30th Division at Cap Sevier, South Carolina, with who he went to France in May of 1918. In France, the 30th Division was brigaded with the British Expeditionary Force up in the Somme River sector (along with the US 27th Division). Private Kitterman was killed in action at Bellecourt, France on September 29th, 1918 and had been initially buried in US Temporary Cemetery #636 at Bony, Department of the Aisne, France. What happened to him following is still a mystery. Doughboy MIA is awaiting paperwork to begin an investigation. 

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Poppy kits with red flower

Poppy seed pack: $64.99

Plant a garden of poppies this spring. At just over $1.00 a seed packet, this is not only a fundraiser program, but actually a reasonably inexpensive poppy seed source for your own beds.

These WW1 Poppy Kits contain 60 Poppy seed packs each.

The red poppy has become the internationally recognized symbol of remembrance for veteran sacrifice. It all began on a war-torn battlefield during World War One, when the crimson petals caught the eye of a soldier named John McCrae, inspiring the poem – “In Flanders Field”.  The flower celebrates the service of more than 4.7 million Americans who served during WW1, and honors the 116,516 who died on the battlefields of Europe. 

When assembled, WW1 Poppy Kits are 4 x 4 x 5" and feature McCrae's poem, as well as an area where you can brand the kit to your organization for fundraising, with a label you can print yourself. 

Each poppy seed packet contains approximately 100mg of seeds.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Wayne Miner

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Wayne Miner


Submitted by:
Sidney Malone

Wayne Miner was born around 1890. Wayne Miner served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1917.

 

 

Story of Service

The Centerville (IA) Semi Weekly Iowegian

Monday, June 23, 1919

KILLED THREE HOURS BEFORE ARMISTICE

Word has been received here of the death in action of Private Wayman Minor, colored, of this city, in France, on the morning of November 11, just three hours before the signing of the armistice.

Minor went with the first colored group of drafted men for this vicinity and crossed to France after a period of training. He took part in several battles and the irony of fate made him a victim just before hostilities ceased. 

Wayman Minor was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ned Minor, of near the Drum and Monkey mine. He also leaves a wife, she making her home with her mother in Kansas City.

Read Wayne Miner's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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March 27, 2018

Stubby promo

SGT Stubby movie partners with the Humane Society of the United States

The "Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero" movie, endorsed by the United Sates World War One Centennial Commission, marches into theaters everywhere April 13. The film is based on the incredible true story of the unbreakable bond between a young Soldier and a stray dog who, for his valorous feats, was the first dog promoted to the rank of Sergeant in the U.S. Army, remains the most decorated dog in U.S. Armed Forces history, and is widely considered the forerunner to the Army's working dog program.

Sgt Stubby mug

The movie's production company, Fun Academy Motion Pictures, has announced a partnership with the Humane Society of the United States and approximately 90 other regional and national animal organizations in all 50 states to support the release of the film through social media, contests, movie screenings, and more. The objective is to promote rescue and adoption by shining a light on the special bond between people and their pets and the amazing things animals can do when given a chance. Read the entire partnership story and find out more about the movie here.


American Women in World War I

Throughout Women's' History Month in March, 2018 we'll be featuring stories of women who served and supported the United States' war effort a century ago.

Opha Mae Johnson

In 1918, while the United States engaged in the battles of World War One and women on the home front fought for suffrage at home, the US Marine Corps enlisted its first woman. WW1CC intern Yasmin Chaudhary writes this week about how Opha Mae Johnson (right) was the first woman to enlist in the US Marine Corps. Prior to enlistment she worked as a civil service employee at the headquarters of the Marines. Like most women enlisted in the Marine Corps, Johnson’s job consisted mainly of typing and military office work. Nevertheless, her place as the first female in the Marine Corps broke barriers for the future. Read more about Opha Mae Johnson's groundbreaking enlistment here.

Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman (left), the first African American and Native American pilot in the world, was inspired to become an aviator by listening to the stories of her barbershop clients in Chicago who were veterans of World War I. Their reminisces of wartime aviation started her dreaming of finding her place in the cockpit. But Coleman had to leave the United States to bring her dreams to reality. Read more of Bessie Coleman's story, inspirational and thrilling at first, but ending in tragedy, here.

Patricia Fara

In her new book, A Lab of One’s Own, author Patricia Fara (right) shows how World War I, one of the bloodiest conflicts in human history, which led to the deaths of nearly 20 million people, also gave some women the chance to emerge from the shadows and show their mettle as scientists, whether by digging experimental trenches to research trench foot, x-raying wounded soldiers on the battlefront, or inventing explosives. Read Fara's entire interview with National Geographic.

Lieutenant Edith Smith

Lieutenant Edith Smith (left) was the first woman ever given a commission in the U.S. Army as a surgeon. Her picture is part of the National Archives "Unwritten Record Blog" article "The Women of World War I in Photographs." The article features photos of women serving in Military Organizations, Civilian Organizations, and in Industry. The article also looks how World War I had a profound impact on the women’s suffrage movement in the United States. Read the entire article and see the photos here.


Rhode Island's Doughboy Roadshow

Matthew McCoy

There was a Doughboy Roadshow event in Rhode Island! Created by Rhode Island World War I Centennial Commission Commissioner Matthew McCoy, this remarkable event was designed to introduce the public to historical appraisers and experts, who could help them correctly identify, and appraise, their World War I-related artifacts and documents. There were also genealogists and archivists who helped people with their research on the World War I veterans in their family tree. The event, similar to a combined “Antiques Roadshow” and “Genealogy Roadshow,” two popular PBS television shows, was held on Saturday, March 10, at the Rhode Island Historical Society. People from all over the area brought World War I-related items for identification, and a free informal, non-binding, appraisal. We talked to Matthew McCoy about the event, and about his efforts with the Centennial Commission in Rhode Island.


Coin Design Contest: African American WWI Hero Sgt. Henry Johnson 100th

Sgt. Henry Johnson

One of the nation's oldest rare coin shops is seeking artists from across the nation to design a silver coin-shaped medallion honoring African American World War I hero Sgt. Henry Johnson. Ferris Coin Co. of Albany, N.Y. is offering two prizes of $1,000 each to the winning designs for the obverse and reverse sides of a 1.5 in (39 mm) coin-shaped silver medallion. The deadline for submissions is April 17, 2018. "It is our hope that through this competition and the medallion it produces, more Americans learn the story of Sgt. Henry Johnson and his sacrifices to this nation," said Geoffrey Demis, co-owner of Ferris Coin. "With humility, we contribute to the efforts of generations who have worked tirelessly to keep Sgt. Johnson's legacy alive and to see his valor given the recognition due." Read all about Sgt. Henry Johnson and the design competition here.


World War I Centennial activities will highlight the EAA AirVenture 2018

EAA

Activities at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 commemorating the centennial of the final year of World War I will feature historic and replica aircraft from the era and flying and other activities that look back at the Great War that concluded with the armistice of 1918. Among the aircraft expected to be on display is a newly restored Dayton-Wright DH.4 Liberty Plane being reconstructed by EAA members and high school students in Tennessee. WWI commemoration activities will take place throughout the week, with a special emphasis on Friday, July 27. Many of the aircraft that will be on display are also connected to the 100th anniversary of the Royal Air Force that is also part of AirVenture week. Read more about the WWI Centennial Commemoration at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 and the Liberty Plane here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, PodbeanTuneIn, Stitcher Radio on Demand.

NEW Now listen on Spotify!

Rags was a mixed breed terrier who served with the U.S. 1st Infantry Division in WW1

Episode #64

Spring Offensive Launches

Highlights:

Spring offensive in the media | @01:50

Operation Michael Overview - Mike Shuster | @10:10

3rd Division, 6th Engineers grab a gun and go - Dr. Edward Lengel | @14:05

‘Women’s Voices In Letters” exhibit - Lynn Heidelbaugh | @20:10

US Army Women’s Museum - Dr. Francoise Bonnell | @25:30

Book “Paws of Courage” - Nancy Furstinger | @31:45

Journey’s end director - Saul Dibb | @38:00

NC State 100C/100M project - Thomas Skolnicki, Benny Suggs and Commissioner Jerry Hester | @44:30

Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @53:20


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

“When the great war broke out,” Vera Britain writes in her memoir,Testament of Youth, “it came to me not as a superlative tragedy but as an interruption of the most exasperating kind to my personal plans.” This week's WWrite blog post takes a look at Britain's disembarkment from post-Victorian ladyhood to WWI field nurse, where she discovers not only the horrors of war tragedy but also the power of feminism. Don't miss this compelling post!


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Otto Vernon Taylor

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Private Otto Vernon Taylor of Alexandria, Indiana. Drafted in April, 1918, he was sent to Camp Taylor, Kentucky for training. Eventually assigned to Company K/339th Infantry, on July 14th, 1918, his deployed to Archangel, Russia as part of a multinational force sent there to protect allied interests. He was killed in action on October 16th, 1919, and reported buried at Kadish, Russia, 400 yards from the Onega River. That spring, the Onega over ran its banks, producing severe flooding along much of its length. In the ensuing inundation, Private Taylor's grave was washed away. 

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Flag At Legion Headquarters

Full size WWI Centennial Flag for Memorial Day: $49.95

Fly this large 3'X5' WWI Centennial Commemoration flag this Memorial day to honor those who served a century ago!

This handsome flag is made of durable nylon and has the iconic Doughboy centennial log screened onto it. It attaches with two strong brass grommets and fits standard flag poles.  

Adorn your post, chapter, City hall, cemetery, lodge, university or school in commemoration of the 2018 centennial this year.

Order now to avoid shipping rush charges. Made in the USA.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Minnie Frances Antrim

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Minnie Frances Antrim


Submitted by:
Mary Rohrer Dexter, Local County History Project
 

Minnie Frances Antrim was born around 1886, Minnie Antrim served in World War 1 in the manner described below 

Story of Service

Minnie Antrim was from a well-known Miami County family.  Her paternal grandfather had been born in Clinton County, Ohio and at some unknown date had migrated to Cass County, Indiana. When her father, the esteemed Nott Nobel Antrim, was ten-years old he was orphaned.  Nott lived with an older brother for two years and then, striking out on his own, worked his way through school and became a lawyer.  Later he was elected to the state legislature. 

Nott married Minnie’s mother, Marilda Adkisson, in 1875.  Minnie’s brother, Nott W, was born in 1881 and Minnie was born in 1886.  Tragically in 1894 Marilda Antrim died. Nott Nobel remarried and the children were raised by their step-mother, Ida Bell Armstrong Antrim. 

As a young woman, Minnie taught music while living in her father’s Peru Township home.  Her involvement in civic affairs is first noted in June of 1917 when she is listed as one of the two officers who were registering women to vote in Miami County Indiana. 

But by 1918 the St Louis City Directory lists Minnie as employed as a stenographer with Mallinckrodt Chemical Works. The Peru paper, in September of that year, when reporting of the upcoming event involving the Liberty Bond Airplane, refers to Minnie as being “stationed at St Louis”.   At this time, no proof of a military involvement has been found for Minnie.  So, what was she doing in St. Louis at the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works?

Read Minnie Frances Antrim's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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March 20, 2018 

USS Cyclops

The mystery of the vanished Navy ship USS Cyclops unsolved 100 years later 

Cyclops clipping

One hundred years ago Wednesday morning, March 14, the USS Cyclops, a massive American World War I transport ship hailed as a "floating coal mine," should have been docked in the waters off Baltimore, fresh off a journey from Brazil. But the vessel -- reported to be the Navy's biggest and fastest fuel ship at the time -- and the 309 men onboard it never pulled into the Chesapeake Bay on March 13, 1918, and its whereabouts to this day remain unknown. "In terms of loss of life and size of ship, it's probably the last great mystery left unresolved," James Delgado, an underwater explorer, told the Baltimore Sun. Read more about the missing ship, and how recent discoveries of historical shipwrecks are renewing hopes amongst the scientific community of finally finding the Cyclops.


American women in World War I

Throughout Women's' History Month in March, 2018 we'll be featuring stories of women who served and supported the United States' war effort a century ago.

Women in WWI education resources

Women have played important roles in all of America’s wars. However, World War I marked the first time women directly participated in the war effort on a wide scale. Their contributions helped win the war, and also helped them make major strides towards equality. The World War I Centennial Commission Education Department has published extensive lessons and resources to help you you to teach/learn about the contributions of American women in the war. Check them out!

Julia Hunt Catlin Park Depew Taufflieb

 Julia Hunt Catlin Park Depew Taufflieb (right) was no ordinary American socialite with six names. WW1CC intern Yasmin Chaudhary writes this week about  how, during the Great War, Taufflieb turned her huge French mansion into a 300-bed military hospital for the Allies. Taufflieb operated the hospital for four years, often under fire, and completely at her own expense. In honor of her actions, Taufflieb was the first American woman to be awarded the Legion d’honneur and Croix de Guerre by the government of France. Read more about Taufflieb's remarkable service here.

Reconstruction Aides

The American Physical Therapy Association is commemorating the 100th anniversary of the first physical therapists in the United States: the reconstruction aides who were civilian employees of the Medical Department of the US Army during World War I. Marguerite Sanderson (left) oversaw the first reconstruction aides, or "re-aides," in the newly created Division of Physical Reconstruction. Mary McMillan was appointed the first re-aide in February 1918 and organized the Physiotherapy Department at Walter Reed General Hospital. Read more about this innovative addition to military medical care in WWI that has become an integral part of American health care a century later.

Katherine Hannan

The Johnson & Johnson Corporation remembers the heroics of their employee, nurse Katherine Hannan, who put her nursing skills to use on the front lines during World War I. The only known female Johnson & Johnson employee to have volunteered for military service during that time, Hannan was first sent to General Hospital #6 at Fort McPherson in Georgia, where she was quickly promoted to head nurse and superintendent, overseeing 100 nurses. A few months later, Hannan was sent to Vladivostok, Siberia, to serve with the American Expeditionary Forces as chief nurse of the Evacuation Hospital, where she and fellow nurses treated wounded soldiers and those suffering from the flu. Read more about this remarkable nurse and how her legacy of service is important to Johnson & Johnson and America.

Edith Wharton

What writers like to do most is to write — ideally in a quiet place, and most often, by themselves. So what motivated four famous woman authors — Edith Wharton, Agatha Christie, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, and Enid Bagnold — to leave their comfortable homes and writing desks, and get involved in war efforts, as nurses and refugee and relief workers? Each of them, two Brits and two Americans, has a unique story of their involvement in World War I, in Britain and France. Read more about their motivations and contributions here.


"ONE: Man, War, Hundred Years" exhibition paints personal WWI story

Wilson painting snip

Michael Wilson is a visual artist, and a military veteran, who has created a remarkable new WWI-themed art exhibit, inspired by the service of his Great Uncle Herb, which will be showing at the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Cedar Rapids Iowa from September 15 – December 30, 2018. This show is entitled "ONE: Man, War, Hundred Years", and the project is endorsed by the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission, and the Iowa WWI Centennial Committee. We had the opportunity to ask Michael some questions about his upcoming exhibit; read his thoughtful answers here.


The Chicagoans who served in WWI

Chicagoans

A century ago, Lt. Arthur Keating, who hailed from Van Buren Street on Chicago’s West Side, led an infantry platoon in a raid on enemy-held trenches in northern France. “Hey Arthur, don’t you know me?” one of the captured Germans said in the English of a Chicago street-corner boy. The two of them had been schoolmates at Austin High School. When World War I had begun in 1914, Keating’s prisoner returned to Germany, where he had been born. Keating joined the U.S. Army.

Military historians observe that all wars, whatever their scale, are essentially composed of myriad clashes between small units — like the one Keating described in a letter to his wife, written from a field hospital where he was recovering from his wounds, in November 1918. Keating’s wife passed his tale on to the Chicago Tribune newspaper, where it appeared among the daily dispatches chronicling the Great War. A century later, the Tribune takes a look back at the memories and experiences of the Chicagoans who served.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Sgt. Stubby publicity shot with girl

Episode #63
Death and Taxes:

Federal Income Tax in 1918 | @02:15

Casualty List Controversy | @05:20

America Emerges - 26th Yankee Division and rats - Dr. Edward Lengel | @07:35

War In The Sky - Personal account of Paris air raids | @13:30

US anti-war activism in 1918 - Mike Shuster | @16:10

Euro WWI Commemoration events - Dr. Monique Seefried | @21:05

Dog Tags reunited with Doughboy - James Shetler | @30:15

Spotlight in the media 1: Sgt. Stubby - Jacy Jenkins | @36:45

Spotlight in the media 2: Journey’s End - Trailer clip | @42:35

100C/100M in Ogden Utah, Terry Schow | @44:55

Speaking WWI - Penguin | @51:10

WWI Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @52:45


Doughboy MIA for week of March 19

Francis William Neidlinger

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Francis William Neidlinger, of Indianapolis. He enlisted in the regular army on August 7th, 1917 and served with the Ambulance Service before being reassigned to the 342nd Infantry/86th Division, with whom he went to France in September, 1918. Once in France, the 86th was skeletonized and sent its men to combat divisions as replacements. Neidlinger was sent to the 56th Infantry/7th Division. He is known to have been killed in action on November 7th, 1918 at Preney Ridge near the Moselle River. He left behind a wife, Hazel.

Can you spare just ten dollars? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Memorial flag on grass

8" x 12" Memorial Flag $7.95

Memorial Day is not that far away! And it is a traditional all over the country to mark our veterans' graves with flags on this day to remember their service. This is a special year, that calls for a special marker flag. A WWI Centennial Marker Flag!

We will sell out - so this year get your order in early. That is why we are reminding you now.

This WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 8 inches x 12 inches and is secured on a 15.75" wooden dowel with a decorative ball on top.  Order them to mark your centennial soldiers on this special centennial year!

Best of all - with every flag you purchase, a portion of your purchase price will go to build America's WWI Memorial in Washington DC. Honor your doughboy and salute them all with this memorial flag.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Mabel Munro

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Mabel Munro

 

Submitted by: Mary Rohrer Dexter, Local County History Project

Mabel Munro born in 1884. Mabel Munro served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1919.

 

Story of Service

Mabel Gray Munro was born October 28, 1884 in Detroit, Michigan. Her father was from Canada and the son of Scottish immigrants. Her mother was an Irish immigrant. Her father was an engineer on the rail road. There were four other children in her family. Two of her brothers would become dentists, the third brother worked in sales and her sister would join her in the profession of nursing. One of her brothers would also serve in WWI.

 In 1888 the family moved to Chicago, but just prior to Mabel’s sophomore year the family moved to Peru, Indiana. Mabel became a graduate of the 1901 class at Peru High School. After Mabel finished high school, her father sent her to Indiana University. She attended classes there starting in 1902 and continuing through 1904, returning for more classes the summer of 1907. While living in Peru, she taught school for seven years. She began in “the country school” where she taught for one year and then moved on to “the grades” where she taught for two years. After that she taught mathematics at Peru High School.

Read Mabel Munro's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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March 13, 2018

My journey with Captain Alfred Swenson

Captain Alfred Marcy Swenson

The American Army dog tags were a gift to James Shetler in appreciation for his research on American World War I veterans for a Dutchman. Previously purchased on eBay, Alfred Marcy Swenson's WWI dog tags had passed through several sets of hands before ending up with Shetler. As he researched Captain Swenson, Shetler found that there were actually many things he had in common with the WWI soldier who was a fellow Minnesotan. Read more about the tale the dog tags helped to tell, and the journey they led their researcher on from France to Minnesota..


American Women in World War I

Throughout Women's' History Month in March, 2018 we'll be featuring stories of women who served and supported the United States' war effort a century ago.

Hello Girls helmets

The commander of the American forces, General John J. Pershing, needed a way to quickly transmit urgent military information. The telegraph messages were too slow getting to the front lines and radios were large, bulky, and difficult to haul about. Pershing decided he wanted civilian trained telephone operators, such as those from the Bell Telephone company, who could speak both English and French. Their job would be to transmit communications via telephone, while serving in the Army Signal Corps near the front lines of battle. These women, referred to as the “Hello Girls,” put through over 100,000 calls a day while operating their switchboards under difficult conditions. They often performed translations of English and French during inter-communications. Many were exposed to the dangers of war by being within a few miles of the combat. Read more about the "Hello Girls" and why their services should be remembered here.

Jane Arminda Delano

WW1CC intern Yasmin Chaudhary writes this week about  nurse Jane Arminda Delano, who played a played an vital part in the war effort through organizing the mobilization of American nurses. In 1909 she became Superintendent of the US Army Nurse Corps, then President of the American Nurses Association and Chair of the National Committee of the Red Cross Nursing Service. By uniting the work of these three services, Jane created American Red Cross Nursing. When the US entered the Great War, she had eight thousand nurses ready for duty.  Throughout the war, over twenty thousand of her nurses had served. Read more about the remarkable service of nurse Jane Arminda Delano here.

Sandelius

Montana author and veteran Ed Saunders is detailing in a forthcoming book the stories of Montana women who went overseas serving in uniform as nurses in World War I. While the historical narrative is not yet ready for publication, Saunders has found details of heroism in many of the women’s stories, including those of Harriet O’Day Nielsen of Laurel, and Elizabeth “Sandy” Sandelius (left) from Cokedale, just two among the 206 Montana women who entered military service in WWI. Read more about the outstanding service that brought official citations for heroism in France to O'Day and Sandelius here.

Stretchers

One hundred years ago, a powerful strain of the flu swept the globe, infecting one third of the world’s population. The aftermath of this disaster led to unexpected social changes, opening up new opportunities for women and in the process irreversibly transforming life in the United States. The virus disproportionately affected young men, which in combination with World War I, created a shortage of labor. This gap enabled women to play a new and indispensable role in the workforce during the crucial period just before the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted women suffrage in the United States two years later. Read more about how the worker shortage caused by the flu and World War I opened access to the labor market for women, and how in unprecedented numbers they took jobs that were previously held exclusively by men.

Doughnuts

A simple fried pastry delivered to American troops in the trenches of World War I provided not only a sweet treat for soldiers, but helped change a nation's attitude to war.  By looking through the lens of history it is possible to understand the true impact of this minute and often overlooked point of change. Read more about how doughnuts were first delivered to the trenches in 1917, during World War I, through the inspiration of American Salvation Army Officers Helen Purviance and Margaret Sheldon, who were assigned to the front line in France.


On Idaho Day, state remembers WWI vets like Hansen, Neibaur, and Buckles

Leland Hansen

“Idaho Remembers” was the 2018 theme for Idaho Day — March 5 this year — honoring members of the armed forces from Idaho who served during World War I. Writing on the Idaho Statesman web site, former member of the Idaho House of Representatives Linden Bateman remembers Thomas Neibaur, the first person born in Idaho to be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor; Leland Hansen (right), who each year would visit history classes at Bonneville High, dressed in his World War I uniform, and tell stories of sacrifice and heroism he witnessed while serving in France; and Frank Buckles, the last surviving Doughboy, who died in 2011 at age 110. Read Bateman's thoughtful and evocative remembrance of those who served their nation in WWI here.


Educational Resources for Teaching about African American WWI Soldiers

Lawson

Paul Larue, a teacher in Washington Court House, a small town in rural southern Ohio, always likes to connect classroom content locally, when possible. Serving as a member of Ohio's WWI Centennial Committee, he helped create educational resources to assist educators in teaching the story of African American WWI Soldiers. In the process, Larue discovered that whether at  the local American Legion Post #653, named after Homer Lawson (above), or exploring in the local cemetery, the rich history of African American service in the Great War is everywhere waiting to be discovered. Read more about the Ohio study guides here.


Five Tech Inventions of WWI and the Scientisists & Engineers Behind Them

Hertha Ayrton

Hertha Marks Ayrton (left), a British mathematician, engineer, physicist, and inventor, worked in WWI to research vortices that could push poison gas back and expel it from a trench. She developed a fan made of cane and canvas; over 100,000 of Ayrton's gas-repelling fans were eventually issued to soldiers on the Western Front.  Ayrton is one of a number of engineers and scientists whose work changed the world then and now.  Read more about World War I technological advancements and the invention of weapons still widely known today here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Dan Dayton speaking on Signal Corps Field Telephone

Episode #62
The Signal Corps in WW1

The founding of the US Army Signal Corps @ |01:30

The Signal Corps in WW1 @ |04:25

War In The Sky - Signal Corps Connections @ |09:00

Alvin York’s crisis of conscience w/ Dr. Edward Lengel @ |13:30

Germany’s starts big push w/ Mike Shuster @ |20:25

Women in the AEF w/ Dr. Susan Zeiger @ |25:15

The Hello Girls w/ Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs @ |32:05

100C/100M in Worcester MA w/ Brian McCarthy @ |40:35

Speaking WW1 - Shody @ |46:15

Social Media Pick w/ Katherine Akey @ |48:15


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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This week's post features writing by Josephine Lehman Thomas, a “government girl” in Washington DC during World War I: a determinedly modern young woman who relished the wartime excitement of the nation's capital – with its soldiers, movie stars, and international celebrities. 

She kept a detailed diary from 1917 until the late twenties, when she was a researcher and ghostwriter for Lowell Thomas. Don't miss this post– a lively record of city life during WWI in the US provided by Thomas' daughter, Margaret Thomas Buchholz!


Doughboy MIA for week of March 12

Curtis Dye

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Curtis Dye, Company B, 313th Machine Gun Battalion, 79th Division.

Private Dye was killed in battle on October 6th, 1918. He was buried on the battlefield with another soldier of his unit in a shellhole grave. When GRS later went to recover his remains, they encountered some difficulty in locating the exact position. Upon further investigation, it was determined that the graves may have already been excavated and that Private Dye could be among the Unknowns buried in France, although there is much room to speculate that his remains were not, in fact, recovered and he still lies on the battlefield. Doughboy MIA has launched an investigation into this case to attempt a determination and believes his remains were NOT recovered. (Thanks to volunteer team member Ben Woodard for the picture of Private Dye!)

Do you wish you could help in Private Dye's case? You can!  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Decal Cropped  

U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal - $3.95

Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  

bumper sticker cropped

 

"They’ve Earned Their Own Memorial" – Bumper Sticker - $3.95

On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site. The World War One Centennial Commission will coordinate events and activities commemorating the U.S. Centennial of The Great War. It is the Commission’s goal to build the memorial.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for this endeavor. You can show your support, and help promote the efforts, by proudly displaying your custom bumper sticker. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial. 


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Linda Konover Meirs

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Linda Konover Meirs

 

Submitted by: Ann Meirs Honadle Van Hise

 

 

Linda Konover Meirs served in World War 1 with the Red Cross. The dates of service are: Known 1916-1919.

Linda Konover Meirs (1884-1972) grew up in Allentown, NJ and obtained her nursing education at the Philadelphia General Hospital School of Nursing and the Mayo Clinic. As a member of the American Red Cross Nurse Corps, she rode with General John Pershing in pursuit of Pancho Villa.

In August of 1916 she was sent with the first American Red Cross Relief Delegation on the USS Mercy Hospital Ship to the European War Zone.

In 1917 she was given a commission to Romania, where she spent a brutal winter. June of the next year, she was assigned chief nurse of Hospital #23, Jouy-sur-Morin, France, where, according to a report from the front, Nurse Meirs "won conspicuous recognition for bravery under fire." She had an old chateau converted into a field hospital, where they received wounded soldiers directly from the front. This was the first of her hospitals to be bombed by air.

Read Linda Konover Meirs' entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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