African American Soldiers 1 Mule Rearing doughboys with mules African American Officers gas masks The pilots Riveters pilots in dress uniforms

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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January 30, 2018

Army Medal

Army medal leads way as U.S. Mint sells half of max 100,000 WWI Coin/Medal sets on first day

Nearly half of the maximum 100,000 sets of the World War I American Veterans Centennial Coin & Medal sets were recorded sold by the U.S. Mint after the first day on sale. As reported by Coin World, a total of 47,061 sets have been sold, with 11,272 containing a U.S. Army medal, 9,343 representing the U.S. Air Service, 9,334 sets featuring the U.S. Navy, 9,417 sets containing the U.S. Marines medal, and 7,695 sets for the U.S. Coast Guard medal, through January 22. The sets went on sale on January 17. For a collector to obtain all five medals, orders would have to be placed for each of the five sets, since the medals are not being offered individually. The Mint is accepting orders for the sets during the first 30 days of the commemorative coin program, and will stop after the sales period ends or when sufficient orders are received across all five set options to exhaust the 100,000-set limit. So if you are thinking about buying a WWI Medal, or a set of medals, better order as quickly as the Army medal is moving. 

World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar

 The World War I Centennial Silver Dollar (pictured at left) will be available for purchase online from the Mint through to December 28, 2018. The Mint sales website is www.catalog.usmint.gov.


A Soldier’s Journey, and the Journey of Fame, Part 1: The Beginning

 

Howard in studio

When the Huffington Post web site decided to do a series of articles on sculptor Sabin Howard (left) and the new National World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington DC, it turned out that they had a real expert on Howard already on hand: contributing writer Traci Slatton, who also happens to be Sabin's wife. As one might imagine, Slatton's insider perspective very much informs her description of the "wild ride" that her husband has been on since he and his design partner architect Joe Weishaar won the competition to design and build the National World War I Memorial. In the first article of the series, Slatton discusses how "There is a personal human cost to a war; even 100 years later, that cost deserves to be honored. In the same way, there is a personal, human cost to making this memorial, and I am writing about it in this series to memorialize that. Artists and their families are people, too." Read the entire first article of this ongoing series here.


SS Tuscania sinking by U-boat in 1918 kills 200 American soldiers off Scotland

Islay graves

February 5, 1918: The sun was setting as the liner S.S. Tuscania and the British convoy made its way toward the cliffs of Scotland through icy gale-force wind and rough seas. Shortly before 6 p.m. a huge shock sent a tremor through the entire ship; all the lights went out at once, followed by the explosive sound of shattering glass. There was no question what had occurred: the Tuscania had been hit by a torpedo. On board were over 2,000 American troops. Read the entire story of the dramatic rescues that reduced the death toll, the tragedy of the unfortunates who were not saved, and how the local Scottish communities remember the event and those who were lost.


American World War I fighter ace's incredible letters to be auctioned

Aircraft

A fascinating archive of wartime letters from a U.S.-born fighter ace who served with British forces during World War I are up for auction in the U.K. Lt. Edgar Taylor was born in Rhode Island to British parents and served in the British Royal Flying Corps, which merged with the Royal Naval Air Service to become the Royal Air Force in 1918. Taylor, wrote home to a recipient known only as "Ruby" during the four months he spent serving with the Royal Flying Corps in 1918. “The content of the letters is superlative,” according to the auctioneer. Read more about this "incredible archive" showing "the matter of fact way this young man dealt with life and death situations" here.


The painstaking process behind those wild WWI “Dazzle” naval paint jobs

Dazzle

Allied ships like the USS Siboney (left) frequently spent 1918 and 1919 dressed up in outlandish "dazzle" paint schemes. The idea was for ships to be seen, “but seen incorrectly,” according to Jennifer Marland, Curator of the National Museum of the United States Navy. If paint could be used to distort a ship’s angles, the thinking went, that would “make it difficult for the ship to be targeted efficiently by a submarine.” But how to test the efficacy of a given scheme for a given ship? The answer: tiny models. Read more about how the U.S. Navy created a vast library of dazzle-painted miniature ships--and maybe saved their real counterparts from torpedoes.


A centennial of subterfuge: the history of Army PSYOPS since World War One

Balloon

On January 23, 2018, the U.S. Army reached a historic milestone: one hundred years of dedicated psychological operations support to military and national security objectives. Of course, the practice of using psychological tactics to influence foreign populations predated 1918. However, it was not until World War I that the U.S. waged the first orchestrated military propaganda campaign in its history, establishing two agencies specifically for that purpose. The 100-year journey of Army PSYOPS from leaflets carried by hydrogen balloons in WWI (left) to the modern sophisticated methods of "delivering selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals" started with a team, never numbering more than thirty assigned and attached officers and soldiers, that went operational in August 1918. Read more about the WWI roots and the subsequent evolution of Army PSYOPS here.


Famed film director Peter Jackson is making a movie about World War One

Peter Jackson

Peter Jackson's next directing project has nothing to do with fantastical worlds: it's a World War One documentary, produced in association with 14-18 NOW, (the London based organization responsible for the poppy display at the Tower of London), set to coincide with the centennial of the war's end. Never-before-seen, century-old footage has been mined, restored, and hand-colorised from the archives of the Museum and the BBC, and will be edited into a feature - in 2D and 3D - by Jackson himself. The film focuses on the experiences of the people involved in the five-year war, as opposed to the larger strategy and politics, working from hundreds of hours of interviews with veterans. Read more about what Jackson says will not be "the usual film you would expect on the First World War" here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

British soldier grin at their captured 1918 Mauser Tankgewehr anti-tank gun

Episode 56
Highlights:

100 Years ago: About President Woodrow Wilson | @01:45

Special Guest: John Milton Cooper Jr. | @07:45

War in The Sky: Introducing General Billy Mitchell | @15:45

American Emerges: Baseball on the Polo Grounds - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:40

European view of the war: Mike Shuster | @22:10

Special Commemorative Coin and Service Medallion Collector Sets | @27:05

A Century In The Making: Joe Weishaar | @28:25

Speaking WWI: Acronym flips RAMC and REPS | @34:25

Spotlight In The Media: Director Peter Jackson | @35:45

100C/100M: The City of Nitro, West Virginia - Rich Hively and Mayor Dave Casebolt | @38:50

WW1 War Tech: Tankgewehr - David O’Neal | @44:45

The Buzz: Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Navy Medal Set

navy medal set

MUST ORDER NOW: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available until Feb. 20, 2018. 

Collector Set: $99.95

The WORLD WAR I 2018 SILVER DOLLAR design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

Navy Medal Obverse  

 

The NAVY SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a U.S. Navy destroyer on escort duty after deploying a depth charge in defense of a convoy. Above, kite balloons provide Navy personnel a platform to spot submarines and other dangers. The inscription “OVER THERE!,” is at the bottom of the design.

 

Navy Medal Reverse


The reverse side depicts a Navy Officer’s Cap Device* used in World War I. The inscriptions are “UNITED STATES NAVY,” “2018,” and “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I." (*Note that an official, uniform seal of the United States Navy had not been adopted at the time of World War I.) 

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only until 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018. 

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


John Mohamed Mondo

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

John Mohamed Mondo

 

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

 

 

John Mohamed Mondo (or Mando) served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1918.

John Mohamed Mondo was born in the late 1890s in Calcutta, British India or Punjab, East India to Mohamed Noor.

At the age of 21, John immigrated to Laredo, Texas from Mexico on July 9, 1909 or 1910. His Border Crossing Card recorded his race as East Indian, as a polygamist, and birth place as Calcutta, India.

By 1917 John Mohamed settled in California and worked as a laborer. His World War I draft card recorded his race as Caucasian and his place birth as Punjab, East India.

Read John Mohamed Mondo's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 23, 2018

First dollar sale

The first official purchase of a World War I Centennial Silver Dollar was made by Colonel Gerald York (right), grandson of WWI hero Sergeant Alvin York. With him at the U.S. Mint gift shop is Acting Deputy Director of the U.S. Mint David Motl (left),

U.S. Mint opens sales of new 2018 WWI Centennial Commemorative Silver Dollar

World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar

The United States Mint has opened sales for their new 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar. This new coin honors the 100th anniversary of American participation in World War I.  The World War I Centennial Silver Dollar was authorized by statute in 2014 with bipartisan Congressional support. Surcharges from the sale of these coins are authorized to be paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars to assist the World War I Centennial Commission in commemorating the centennial of World War I. Also on sale by the Mint in conjunction with the Centennial Silver Dollar are five military medals, honoring the U.S. armed forces who served in WWI. Read more about the coins and how to purchase yours here.


Designer of national WWI memorial visits Joplin, Missouri for Scouting event

 

Weishaar at Joplin Scout event

The Boy Scouts of America and the country's efforts in World War I are closely intertwined. Even 100 years ago, Scouts planted gardens to feed soldiers, collected fruit pits and shells to be used in gas masks, gathered wood for weapons and more. Perhaps it makes sense then that a 27-year-old Eagle Scout will be in charge of memorializing America's World War I service members a century later. Joe Weishaar, a Fayetteville, Arkansas, native and Chicago-based architect, was selected in 2016 to lead the design of the World War One Centennial Commission's memorial in Pershing Park in Washington, D.C. Read more about Weishaar's message to the Scouts here. Read more about the new National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC here. 


"The U.S. Navy was a key contributor to the German decision to end the war."

Dr. Dennis Conrad

The role of the U.S. Navy in the Great War is one that is, at times, debated, but mostly forgotten, primarily due to the lack of large-scale naval warfare and victories comparable to the Spanish-American War and later World War II. However, the Navy did provide crucial functions, including transportation of over 2.5 million soldiers, supplies, service as aircraft carriers, and more. Dr. Dennis Conrad, Historian at the the Naval History and Heritage Command, visited the Centennial Commission on Friday, December 1, 2017, and gave a presentation on the various operations performed by the U.S.Navy throughout World War I. Dr. Conrad holds a P.h.D from Duke University in history and has done extensive work for the NHHC researching and documenting Navy history from the American Revolutionary War up to the Spanish American War. He is currently working on a biography of Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy during World War I. We asked him a few questions after his presentation to the Centennial Commission staff.


True Sons of Freedom: African-American veterans of WWI were "pivotal figures"

Dr. Jennifer Keene

Often forgotten today, the African-American veterans of World War One were pivotal figures in the modern American civil rights movement who fought valiantly to break down racial barriers within the military and at home. Returning home with their heads held high, they inspired the next generation of black servicemen to continue the struggle against racial discrimination. Dr. Jennifer Keene, member of the Historical Advisory Board of the United States World War One Centennial Commission, tells the story of these largely-unsung Civil Rights heroes on the American Legion web site here.


When the Great War reached Wisconsin, Free Speech was the First Casualty

Wisconsin senator Robert LaFollette caricature mug

Once the United States joined the fight against the Kaiser in WWI, Congress and President Wilson’s administration implemented legislation and surveillance programs designed to keep America safe by ferreting out subversive activity and crushing dissent—especially in states like Wisconsin with a significant population of ethnic German-Americans. Even Wisconsin senator Robert LaFollette was accused of working for the Kaiser against America. The chilling effect of the both official and unofficial repressions of free speech in Wisconsin is explored thoughtfully on the Smithsonian Institution's What It Means to be American web site here.


Flu killed more American soldiers in World War I than any single battle

Fort Riley hospital clip

The second flu wave of 1918 coincided with the Meuse-Argonne Campaign of World War I, according to the National Institute of Health (NIH). Over 1 million U.S. troops participated, and it was our largest front-line commitment of the war. Statistics vary, but NIH reports that 26,277 American soldiers died during this campaign, the deadliest World War I battle for U.S. troops. However, the flu killed more U.S. soldiers than did any Great War battle: 15,849 U.S. soldiers in France and another 30,000 in stateside camps. That’s 45,849 killed by the flu versus 26,277 killed at Meuse-Argonne — documenting that the flu was by far our most deadly battle. Read more about how the great influenza epidemic wreaked havoc with American troops here.


Book & TV to tell story of Scotland-born American soldier who died on ship sunk by U-boat in World War I 100 years ago

The Drowned and the Saved

On February 5, 1918, German submarine UB-77 sank a British troopship, SS Tuscania, between Scotland's Rathlin Island and Islay. More than 200 men died – most of them young American ‘Doughboys’ on their way to the trenches of World War One. But one of the lost ‘Americans’ was actually born in the  nearby town of Bute, who had emigrated to the USA and had got caught up in the war in 1917, just after American joined the Allied cause. Scottish writer and documentary film-maker Les Wilson discovered the story of how  Bute’s Alexander McAlister became a soldier and victim of a U-boat. Read more about how Wilson has brought the century-old tragedy to a book and upcoming television program here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

This is a typical diving suit of the period. A variation of this deep sea diving suit called the Mark V was used from 1916 all the way until 1984

Episode 55
Highlights:

Government shuts down US Industries, shocking nation | @01:40

America Emerges: Military Stories From WWI - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:25

Wilson’s 14 points examined - Mike Shuster | @17:05

US Mint releases commemorative coins and service collector sets | @22:40

A Century In The Making - Sabin Howard Part 2 | @24:50

Speaking WWI - Conk Out! | @30:55

Eagle Scout Memorial Project - Benjamin Woodard | @32:15

The Sunken Gold - Joseph A. Williams | @37:25

Erik Burro’s “Legacy of Remembrance” photo exhibit | @44:30

The messenger birds of WW1 | @45:25

Centennial of WW1 in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @46:30


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Listen to the silence. 
This is what Yoshi Oida, director of the unprecedented performance of Britten's musical masterpiece War Requiem at the Lyon Opera, asks of his spectators. 

Read about Oida's connection with WWI through stories about Hiroshima, the experience of children in war, and his latest film with Martin Scorcese. Don't miss this follow-up to last week's interview with Paul Groves, the tenor of Oida's show!


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Army Medal Set

Army Service medal

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available until Feb. 20, 2018. 
ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

The SERVICE MEDAL design depicts a soldier cutting through German barbed wire while a second soldier aims a rifle amid a shattered landscape of broken trees and cratered earth. A shell explodes in the distance.

The reverse design depicts the United States Army emblem, which was also in use during World War I. Inscriptions include “OVER THERE!,” “CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I,” “2018,” and “UNITED STATES ARMY.”

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only unitl 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Edward Ball Cole 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Edward Ball Cole

 

Submitted by: Carolyn Cole Kingston {granddaughter}

 

 

Major Edward Ball Cole, Commander of the 6th Battalion of the 4th Marine Brigade, died from wounds received in the Battle of Belleau Wood on June 10, 1918. He is buried at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, Belleau, France.

My grandfather, Edward B. Cole, entered the Marine Corps in 1904 as a 2nd Lieutenant. Over the course of the next 13 years he served in Porto Rico, Mexico, and the Philippines. Beginning in July of 1917, Major Cole spent several months in command of the 1st, (later renamed the 6 th), Machine Gun Battalion of Marines training at Quantico, Virginia. Highly respected for his knowledge of the machine gun, he had by then invented a tripod to hold one and a portable cart to carry one. He had also published a book, A Field Guide for Machine Gunners, and served at Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

By the time of his departure for France on December 14, 1917, he was married to Mary Welsh, and had two sons: Charles H. Cole 2nd (my father) age 10, and Edward B. Cole Jr. age 8. Arriving in the port of St. Nazaire, France, he traveled by train to the Bourmont training area, where he and Captain Curtis (co-author of The History of the 6th Machine Gun Battalion) were housed in the village of Germainvilliers. In mid-March they moved to the Verdun sector where they were encamped at P.C. Moscou.

Read Edward Ball Cole's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 16, 2018

Doughboy statue sparks NJ historian's mission to photograph WWI monuments

Erik Burro

For years, Erik Burro would pass the statue of a WWI U.S. soldier every day on his commute just a few blocks from his city home and office but he paid it little attention. His realization in 2016 that the centennial of U.S. entry into World War in 1917 was approaching the following year made him stop and take a closer look at the Burlington statue depicting a Doughboy, and the memorial hall behind it. The visit to the statue triggered his curiosity and eventually led him to become a man on a mission to find and photograph other World War I monuments, first in South Jersey and then statewide, a quest that has resulted in traveling photography exhibits of major WWI monuments in the state. Read more about Burro's "Legacy of Remembrance" here.

Are you regularly passing by what could be a lost World War I memorial in a city, town, park, or cemetery? Stop and take your own closer look. Check on the National World War One Centennial web site Memorial Map and see if your local memorial is listed. If not, join the Memorial Hunters Club by submitting the memorial for inclusion on the national map. Here's how to submit a found memorial. 

  Club logo vertical small

"Learn more about this war and its continued impact on us today"

Timothy P. Brown

Author/historian Timothy P. Brown has an interest in World War I, and his interest led him to a unique aspect of the war -- football. The game was in early stages of development at the time of the war, but it was already a nationally-popular pastime to play, and to watch. It was also a growing symbol that brought context and high-relief to the actions taking place in the war, and to the people who were fighting in it. His new book, Fields of Friendly Strife, follows the players of the 1918 Rose Bowl, on the field, and on the battlefields. Timothy Brown gave us some moments to discuss the book, the war, and how football was more than just a game.


Naval War College Museum unveils exhibit to teach about World War I

Sims

The U.S. Naval War College Museum in Newport, RI has unveiled a new exhibit to teach people more about World War I. It focuses on the Navy’s role in the war, using the career of Navy Adm. William S. Sims to tell the story. Sims commanded U.S. naval forces in Europe during the war, and his family donated artifacts for the War College exhibit. The Navy’s role in WWI was the learning ground where the officers who became the fleet's strategists in World War II figured out how to coordinate complex operations and forge relationships with allies. Sims went on to lead the war college. He changed the curriculum based on his experiences during the war and influenced a generation of naval leaders. Read more about Admiral Sims and the Naval War College exhibit here.


Unsung heroes of World War I: how carrier pigeons saved American lives

Cher Ami

Unsung heroes of World War I, the carrier pigeons of both the Allied and Central Powers helped assist their respective commanders with an accuracy and clarity unmatched by technology. The National Archives has a vast collection of messages that these feathered fighters delivered for American soldiers. Using these messages and the history of the carrier pigeon in battle, we can look at what hardship these fearless fowls endured and how their actions saved American lives. One of the most impressive things about the war records of the carrier pigeons was how widely the birds were used. Their service as battlefield messengers is their most known use, and the pigeons found homes in every branch of service. Read more about these essential feathered flying communicators here.


‘Astounding’ WWI painting on loan from UK coming to National WWI Museum

John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent (self-portrait at left) was an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian-era luxury.  But he is remembered for his work as a combat artist in WWI.  Asked to create a work embodying Anglo-American co-operation, the 62 year-old traveled to the Western Front in July 1918, where he encountered "a harrowing sight, a field full of gassed and blindfolded men" that inspired his amazing "Gassed." The painting, currently on display at the Frist Center in Nashville, will make one more stop in the U.S. -- at the National World War One Museum and Memorial  in Kansas City -- before returning to the Imperial War Museum in London. Read how a special space and special welcome are being prepared for the monumental work.


Travel Documents for post-WWI Gold Star pilgrimages held at National Archives

Gold Star list

On March 2, 1929, President Calvin Coolidge signed PL 70-952. That law authorized the War Department to arrange for trips, designated as pilgrimages, by the mothers and widows to the overseas graves of soldiers, sailors, and Marines who died between April 5, 1917 and July 21, 1921. Congress later expanded eligibility to include the mothers and widows of men who were buried at seas or whose place of burial was unknown. After World War I, more than 30,000 American dead from that conflict remained overseas, buried in U.S. cemeteries. The passage of the law resulted from the work of the mothers and widows of those servicemen and their supporters who pushed for the pilgrimage to the gravesites at government expense. The resulting trips took place between 1930 and 1933. To facilitate travel by the mothers and widows, the Department of State established the “Special Pilgrimage Passport.” Read more about these unique travel documents.


World War I Centennial Ceremonies scheduled at ABMC sites in Europe

Cantigny American Monument in France

To commemorate and remember America's role in World War I, American Battle Monument Commission sites in Europe will host a variety of centennial ceremonies in 2018. Commemorations will kick off Memorial Day weekend 2018 with special ceremonies at Somme American Cemetery, Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Cantigny Monument. The ceremonies will continue throughout the year, ending with the 100th anniversary of the Armistice. The ceremonies will mark the 100th anniversary of key events, such as the first World War I U.S. Offensive, the Battle of Belleau Wood, the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, and more. All the ceremonies are free to attend and open to the public. Read more about the planned ABMC centennial memorial ceremonies here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Renault FT Tank

Highlights - Episode #54

1917 key events in review |@ 01:30

Wilson’s 14 points |@ 07:50

Crisis for the allies - Mike Shuster |@ 11:45

A Century in the Making - Sabin Howard |@ 16:45

Speaking WW1 - Tank |@ 25:00

The Education Program - Dr. Libby O’Connell |@ 26:30

100 Cities / 100 Memorials Round #2 deadline |@ 32:40

The Chaplains Corps in WW1 - Dr. John Boyd |@ 33:15

American Women Physicians in WW1 |@ 39:10

PAFA at Frist |@ 40:30

The Buzz - Katherine Akey |@ 41:15


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

Wwrite Blog Logo

Benjamin Britten's Musical Masterpiece, War Requiem. Part 1: Interview with Tenor, Paul Groves

This week's WWrite blog post features the WWI musical masterpiece by British composer, Benjamin Britten–War Requiem.We hear from the world-renowned tenor, Paul Groves, on the unique performance of War Requiem at Europe's premier opera house, the Lyon Opera in France. Part poetry, party liturgy, part theater, see the ways in which this operatic representation has wowed the world. Through the lens of WWI, Groves talks about Pink Floyd, Hiroshima, Wilfred Owen, education, and his family's war history. Not to miss!


World War I Centennial 2018 Silver Dollar and Air Service Medal Set

Air Service Set

FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY: These combination coin and service medal sets will only be available for 1 month. ORDER NOW. $99.95

The COIN design, titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines in the lower right hand side of the design. Inscriptions include “LIBERTY,” “1918,” and “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

The SERVICE MEDAL design depicts an iconic SPAD XIII, a World War I fighter flown by many Americans and valued for its speed, strength, and firepower, viewed from the top and side. The inscription “SPAD XIII” identifies the aircraft.

These sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five medal product options, and can be ordered only between noon ET on January 17, 2018, and 3 p.m. ET on February 20, 2018, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be based on the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Produced by the US Mint, the World War I Centennial 2018 Uncirculated Silver Dollar, the Proof Silver Dollar and the 5 service medal combination sets are all available for a limited time directly from the US Mint.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Oscar Lubchansky

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Oscar Lubchansky

 

Submitted by: Gene Fax {Grandson}

 

 

Oscar Lubchansky born around 1896, Oscar Lubchansky served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

An AEF Veteran’s War Stories

These stories were told to me by my grandfather, former Sergeant Oscar Lubchansky (d. 1958), 2nd Battalion, 313th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division, American Expeditionary Forces.

Whether they are historically accurate is debatable, but they are an accurate representation of a veteran’s memories. At this late date, second-hand memories are all we’ve got.

American soldiers had an insatiable appetite for fresh eggs. Whenever Lubchansky and his comrades were en route and a halt was called, the soldiers would crowd around the kitchen door of the nearest farmhouse shouting, “Oofs! Oofs!” The farm wives would be frightened at first, but would soon figure out that the Americans wanted des oeufs and would pay for them. After that, all went well.

Read Oscar Lubchansky's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 9, 2018

The Next Step in ‘A Soldier’s Journey’ to the new national World War One Memorial

Sculpture detail

While the recent ceremonial groundbreaking for the new national World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC was taking place in the nation's capital, sculptor Sabin Howard was on the other side of the world at Weta Workshop in New Zealand, designing and sculpting the small-scale model (maquette) for the sculptural component of the memorial—a 65-foot-long bronze relief titled “A Soldier’s Journey.” The Epoch Times newspaper interviewed Howard a few days after he had completed the maquette, and last week published the interview with new photos of the sculpture. Read the entire in-depth article here.


Soccer event honors Christmas Truce

Christmas Soccer trophy

Veterans of the Great War were honored on Christmas Day as soccer lovers from the Leavenworth, Kansas area paid homage to one of the most unique and inspirational events in human history. The Christmas Truce, the unofficial ceasefires along the Eastern and Western Fronts, was commemorated Monday by soccer enthusiasts in the fifth annual Truce Tournament hosted by Sporting Club, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and The Soccer Lot. WWI Centennial Commissioner and National World War I Museum and Memorial President and CEO Dr. Matthew Naylor was at the event to help present the trophy. Read more about the homage to the soccer games of the Christmas Truce here.


Online exhibit explores "American Women Physicians in World War I"

Dr. Esther Pohl

The American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA) has created a remarkable new online exhibit, "American Women Physicians in World War I". When the United States entered the war in 1917, women physicians numbered less than 5% of all physicians. Many were eager for the chance to serve their country. But when the Army Surgeon General sent out a call for physicians to serve in the Medical Corps, the women who applied were rejected. Women physician leaders across the country protested this decision and petitioned the government, but the War Department stood firm. Dr. Esther Pohl Lovejoy would later write, “Our Government provided for the enlistment of nurses, but not for women physicians. This was a mistake. It is utterly impossible to leave a large number of well-trained women out of a service in which they belong, for the reason that they won’t stay out.” Click here to read more about how Dr. Lovejoy and her resolute comrades found other ways to participate, and make lasting contributions to the war effort.


President Woodrow Wilson debuts his Fourteen Points on January 8, 1918

Wilson

On January 8, 1918 -- long before the 1919 Treaty of Versailles -- President Woodrow Wilson addressed the U.S. Congress with what would later become known as his "Fourteen Points" that were "Fundamental to America's War Aims." Up until then, there had been no explicit statement of war aims by any of the nation’s fighting during World War I. Wilson proclaimed that the problems specified in his Fourteen Points affected the whole world; “...Unless they are dealt with in a spirit of unselfish and unbiased justice, with a view to wishes, the natural connections, the racial aspirations, the security, and the peace of mind of the peoples involved, no permanent peace will be attained.” Read how this important speech and the list of principles that were to shape U.S. foreign policy going forward in WWI came about.


"No one left, or walked away, they all wanted to see more."

Gassed

The landmark art exhibit World War I and American Art will close out its current run at Nashville's Frist Center on 21 January. This ambitious show was originally organized by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA), Philadelphia, and it was timed to coincide with the centennial of the entry of the U.S. into the war. The show came to the Frist in August of last year. The exhibit revisits a critical period in history through a wide variety of artistic responses, ranging from patriotic to dissenting. The artworks show an incredible range, and include painting work by Georgia O'Keefe, who lost a brother in the war; photography by Edward Steichen, who flew aerial reconnaissance missions with the Army Air Corps; and masterwork painting "Gassed", by John Singer Sargent, which is on loan from the Imperial War Museum in the UK. We reached out to the staff of the Frist Center, to discuss the exhibition. Frist Center Curator Trinita Kennedy, Director of Education and Community Engagement Anne Henderson, and Director of Communications Ellen Pryor, responded to our questions about the show, about the war, and about impact on the local region.


Doughnut Girls: Women who fried donuts and dodged bombs on the front in WWI

Stella Young

During World War I, the Salvation Army sent women to France to lift the spirits of the soldiers – and to serve them comfort food. Their food of choice? Hot donuts. The women became known as “Doughnut Girls.” When America entered the hostilities in April 1917, Evangeline Booth (USA National Commander) placed the entire Salvation Army in the USA on a war-service basis. Hostels and service centers were established adjacent to military camps and when the American Expeditionary Force went to France, Lt-Colonel W. William Barker was dispatched to see how the Army could best serve them. In response to Barker’s request to “Send over some Lassies”, Evangeline dispatched a group of eleven handpicked officers, including four single women believing that quality mattered more than quantity. Read more about how the Salvation Army delivered the doughnuts to the Doughboys here.


The U.S. economy in World War I: fighting the war of production and finance

Auto Factory

When war broke out in Europe in the summer of 1914, a sense of dread rippled through the American business community. So great was the fear of contagion from tumbling European markets that the New York Stock Exchange was closed for more than three months, the longest suspension of trade in its history. At the same time, businesses could see the enormous potential the war might bring to their bottom lines. The economy was mired in recession in 1914 and war quickly opened up new markets for American manufacturers. In the end, World War I set off a 44-month period of growth for the United States and solidified its power in the world economy. Read more about the impact of the Great War on America's economy here.


The brave animals that helped America's Doughboys win in World War One

Unbearable

Rags was as brave and hardworking as the American soldiers he fought alongside during World War I. But one key detail set him apart from the men serving in the First Division American Expeditionary Forces: He was a dog. The stray dog turned soldier was just one of the estimated millions of dogs, horses, camels and other animals that served during the Great War. Often referred to as “military mascots,” these beasts of burden typically acted as soldiers’ companions. But military mascots didn’t just lend a supportive paw: They did real work on the battlefield. The National Archives' massive scanning project for its American Unofficial Collection of World War Photographs (165-WW) revealed an astounding assortment of animals,  including dogs, raccoons, an alligator, and a bear, keeping U.S. forces company. Read more about the amazing menagerie of American Military Mascots here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

Red Cross nurse helps wounded soldiers

Favorite Stories of 2017 - Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of our 2017 favorite stories in review!

June 28, Episode 26 - From 100 Years ago this week : The Red Cross we know today | @ 01:05

July 5, Episode 27 - From Events - “Ready to Serve” - a one woman show about WWI Nurses - with Ellouise Schoettler | @ 07:50

July 12, Episode 28 - From Commission News - farewell to Former Commissioner James Nutter with Dan Dayton | @ 12:55

July 19, episode 29 - 100 Years ago this week - A tale of combat between a merchant ship and a U-boat | @ 14:05

July 26 Episode 30 - From the Buzz - The Kodak Vest Pocket Camera with Katherine Akey | @ 17:20

August 30, Episode 35 - From Speaking WWI - Field Day | @ 19:35

Sept. 27, Episode 39 - from Speaking WWI - OMG.. Really! | @ 20:55

October 4, episode 40 - From the Great War Project - Ring of Spies in Palestine with Mike Shuster | @ 22:10

October 18, Episode 42 - From 100 Cities / 100 Memorials the genesis and future of the program  with Ken Clarke | @ 26:00

November 1, episode 44 - From 100 Years ago this week - Living in NYC? Did a Slacker live in your apartment building 100 years Ago? | @ 31:25

October 25, Episode 43 - From Commission News - America’s WWI Memorial in Washington DC - with Edwin Fountain  | @ 33:50

November 8 - Episode 45 - From the Great War Project - The Eastern Front Collapses - with Mike Shuster | @ 39:05

November 15, Episode 46 - From 100 Years ago This week - The Suffragists in WWI | @ 43:00 

December 6, Episode 49 - From the WWrite Blog - German songwriter/soldier found from rediscovering his music | @ 51:25

 


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Laura Pepper Poster

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English Artist WWI Poster - $12.50

Laura Pepper, an English artist living in the UK, was moved to produce this commemorative image to mark the historic First World War Centenary (originally an oil on canvas but a complete departure from her usual genre).

The spirit of the time is conveyed by the use of sepia tones. However, it is foremost a symbolic painting which she hopes the viewer will find both atmospheric and poignant, connecting with the present generation as they reflect on the battles fought by their relatives and the human cost involved, personal reflection encouraged by national and international commemorative events over this centenary period.

To this end, some nineteen key battle names are mentioned in the entanglement of barbed wire and the five poppies are symbolic of those five years of war in which a generation was lost.

As she wanted the image to resonate with the widest possible audience, the lone soldier is not specific to any particular regiment and is intentionally not wearing a steel helmet (first introduced to British soldiers in 1915), as she wanted to accentuate the vulnerability of the men on the battlefield in such basic uniform.

The destiny of the lone soldier walking a path where so many soldiers have trodden before him is for the viewer to decide - is he symbolic of the survivors of battle or of the fallen?

The role of the Royal Flying Corps in reconnaissance and artillery observation is acknowledged. The fractured cartwheel in the bottom right-hand corner of the picture represents in particular the role of the horse and mule in WW1, used mostly to transport ammunition and supplies to the Front, they sustained heavy losses in appalling conditions.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


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Sgt Henry Veal, II

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Henry Veal

 

Submitted by: Johnette Brooks

 

 

Sgt Henry Veal, II served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The dates of service are: Known 30 APR 1918 - 30 AUG 1918

18 FEB 1895, Henry was born in the Spring Hill District 2 of Milledgeville, GA. He was the baby son of eleven (11) children of Henry Veal, I and Lucy Ann Hearst of Deepstep, GA (the home of the Honorable Elijah Mohammed, Nation of Islam). Henry, II’s father was a minister and a farmer. Henry, II (Sr.) grew up a few doors down from his future bride, Mamie Solomon on the highway that would later (13 AUG 2011) be named in their honor. He joined Green Pastures Baptist Church as a youth and attended school until the 5th Grad . On 5 JUN 1917, Henry registered for the WWI Draft.

He was inducted in Milledgeville GA on 29 APR 1918 and was entrained on 30 APR at Camp Gordon in the 157th Depot Brigade until September 21, 1918. he departed Newport News VA on the USS Mercury headed for Brest, France.

Read Henry Veal's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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January 2, 2018 

"The Poppy Lady" Moina Belle Michael: a century-long legacy of helping veterans

Moina Belle Michael

It began with a simple idea from a University of Georgia professor — sell poppy flowers to raise money on behalf of soldiers killed and injured in World War I. Now, nearly 100 years and billions of dollars later, the poppy has become the international symbol of remembrance and support for all military veterans, thanks to the tireless efforts of Moina Belle Michael, affectionately known today as "The Poppy Lady." "During her lifetime, if you adjust for inflation, poppy sales raised $3 billion worldwide, most of which went directly to veterans," said Tom Michael, a great nephew of Moina Michael, who died in 1944. "She championed the poppy as a permanent symbol and reminder of our collective obligation to support our veterans and their families And through all the poppy sales around the world, her legacy of helping veterans lives on." Read more here about  the education professor from Good Hope, GA.


The Four Minute Men, and the U.S. Committee on Public Information in WWI

George Creel

President Wilson established the Committee on Public Information (CPI) soon after the declaration of war in 1917, responsible for interpreting and creating messages about the home front and the war to maintain public support for the U.S. war effort. Committee chairman George Creel, a Midwest newspaper man, embarked on a national propaganda campaign that incorporated nearly every type of medium to spread a positive message about war. But one Creel innovation was much more personal: the Four Minute Man program, involving over 70,000 volunteer speakers. Read more about the impact of Creel's person-to-person program here.


Mt. Airy, PA War Tribute re-dedication

Mt. Airy, PA War Tribute

In the Philadelphia neighborhood of Mount Airy, a ceremony was held in December, 2017 to rededicate the Mount Airy World War I Tribute memorial, with newly-installed bronze plaques. Originally dedicated May 25, 1924 with the names of 34 men and one woman from Mount Airy who lost their lives during the First World War, the original plaques were lost sometime in the 1970s. Read more about the detective work and local dedication that restored the stone tribute to the Mt. Airy WWI war dead.


Christmas Eve road march in NY honors deployed service members, WWI history

New York Road March

New York National Guard Soldiers, Airmen, families and community supporters made up more than 1,200 marchers in Glens Falls, NY on Dec. 24 as part of a Christmas Eve Road March to remember the service of past and present troops overseas. The 2017 march included Soldiers in khaki leading the march instead of the more commonplace camouflage, as a special contingent of New York Army National Guard Soldiers from the 42nd Infantry Division Headquarters, based in Troy, led the road march in replica WWI uniforms, commemorating the service of New York's Doughboys of WWI and remembering their arrival in France in 1917 for combat service. Read more about how this event saluted those Doughboys who marched from their initial staging areas in France to their combat assembly areas, covering nearly 100 kilometers over 18 days in extraordinarily bitter winter weather.


In Flew Enza: Remembering the deadly 1918 Plague Year in Berkeley, California

Plague year

In 1918, America was at war and students arriving at the University of California in the fall of that year found their campus transformed. From the Center Street entrance, the view of the hills was now obscured by large new barracks and the dark smoke issuing from the powerhouse gave the place the look of a factory. Everywhere young men wore the khaki uniforms of the various military outfits represented on campus—the Student Army Training Center, the School of Military Aeronautics, the Naval Unit, and the Ambulance Corps.But the military preparations were not the most dangerous new arrivals in Berkley: the flu epidemic had emerged in Kansas in January 1918 soon struck the campus on its way around the world, killing both high and low, young and old. Read more about how the flu devastated Berkley, and how the institution coped with its piece of the global epidemic.


Laurence Stallings used his World War I experience to inspire books, plays & films

Laurence Stallings

Laurence Stallings, who graduated with a Master’s degree from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in 1922, turned his experience as a wounded Marine in the First World War (awarded the Silver Star, and given the Croix de Guerre by the French Government) into inspiration for a career as a journalist, author, and playwright. Read more about how this luminary figure of arts and letters overcame the loss of a leg, and lives on in the legacy of his contribution to literature, film, theater, and journalism—especially his exceptional work capturing the history and experience of the First World War.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web site, iTunes, Google Play, and TuneIn.

2017-new year podcast thumb

Favorite Stories of 2017 - Part 1

January 4,  Episode #1- our first story! | @ 01:05

February 15, Episode #7 - "Stories of Service" and "Family Ties" introduced by Chris Christopher | @ 02:15

March 8, Episode #10 - War in the sky -The story of Baron von Zeppelin | @ 04:05

March 29, Episode #13 - Special Feature - about horses and mules serving | @ 07:50

April 5 and April #12 - Episodes 14 and 15 - Commission News - In Sacrifice for Liberty and Peace - with Ed Bilous and Chris Christopher | @ 11:20

April 26  Episode #17 - 100 years ago this week - The selective service act of 1917 | @ 19:10

April 26 - Episode #17 - War In the Sky - It turned into the world’s largest aerospace company | @ 21:05

May 3, Episode #18 - Spotlight in the media - introducing Sgt. Stubby the animated film with Jordan Beck | @ 23:30

May 3 Episode #18 - From the BUZZ - Moss is mostly good with Katherine Akey | @ 28:05

May 10, Episode #19 - 100 Years ago This week -  For Mother’s day - Mothers in WW1 | @ 29:20

June 6, Episode #23 - Commission News - A brief mission profile from Commission Executive Director - Dan Dayton | @ 35:25

Also June 6, Episode #23 - Special Feature - George Cohan’s “Over There” turns 100 - with Richard Rubin and Jonathan Bratten | @ 36:50

June 14, 2017, Episode 24 - Spotlight in the media - Three theories on why Wonder Woman is set in WW1 |@ 43:20

June 14, Episode 24 - International Report - The Violin of Private Howard | @ 45:40


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Native Americans: Soldiers Unknown
by Chag Lowry (Yurok/Maidu/Achumawi)

Chag Lowry wants us to feel the experience of Native Americans in WWI. This week's WWrite blog comes from his project working to release these lost voices. Conscripted from their tribal home in Northern California by a country they barely knew - to serve in a war they could hardly call their own - young Yurok men nevertheless demonstrated immense courage and humanity on the battlefields of France in WWI. In his post, Lowry talks about his forthcoming graphic novel, Soldiers Unknown, which reveals the untold story of the native Yurok men who fought and died for the US in 1914-1918. 


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

ww1 Decal

U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal: $3.95 each

Remember the Centennial of the "War that changed the world" and remind others all year - with these great 6" tall window decals. Put them in car windows, office doors, shop windows and all other places that will help the conversation about WWI get started.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Stanley Lionel

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Stanley Lionel

 

Submitted by: Tanveer Kalo

 

 

Stanley Lionel served in World War 1 with the United States Army . The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Stanley Lionel was born on January 15, 1893 or 1894 in Ceylon, British India. Lionel's birth year is contested because multiple documents list different years. He immigrated to the United States in either 1904, or 1905 or 1914. The exact year of his arrival is contested by his 1930 census and naturalization application. After his arrival, Lionel settled in Manhattan, New York.

Lionel enlisted in the U.S. Army on June 5, 1917. His World War I draft card recorded his race as "Ceylonian" and birth date as January 15, 1893. Lionel started his service at Fort Solcum, New York. He was then assigned to the 13th Cavalry Regiment at Fort Ringgold, Texas. His unit was assigned to the Mexican-U.S. border. On December 17, 1917, Lionel was promoted to Private First Class.

Read Stanley Lionel's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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