African American Officers The pilots doughboys with mules gas masks Mule Rearing Riveters African American Soldiers 1 pilots in dress uniforms

Dispatch Newletter

The WWI Centennial Dispatch is a weekly newsletter that touches the highlights of WWI centennial and the Commission's activities. It is a short and easy way to keep tabs on key happenings. We invite you to subscribe to future issues and to explore the archive of previous issues.

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July 17, 2018 

CFA meeting July 19 could bring go ahead for building National World War I Memorial in DC 

Center of sculpture stencil 48

The Commission of Fine Arts (CFA) in Washington, DC will meet on Thursday, 19 July 2018,  9 a.m. at 401 F Street, NW, Suite 312, with the design for the National World War Memorial being the second item on the meeting agenda.  The CFC will take written public comments regarding the design to be distributed to CFA members for their consideration. The CFC does not guarantee that comments received after 4:00 p.m. the day before a Commission meeting will be reviewed prior to presentations. Therefore, if you want to support the National World War Memorial in Washington, DC, submit your written comments here before 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18, 2018.


Senators Tester, Heller introduce measure to honor WWI "Hello Girls"

 

Hello Girls quartet

U.S. Senators Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) are honoring the groundbreaking service of the women who connected American and French forces on the front lines during World War I. The Senators’ bipartisan Hello Girls Congressional Gold Medal Act will award the women of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, dubbed the Hello Girls, with the Congressional Gold Medal for their service and subsequent 60 year fight to be recognized as veterans. Read more about this bipartisan proposed legislation here.


"Wild Bill" William Wellman made history in World War I and on the cinema screen

William Wellman

When the United States entered World War I, William Augustus Wellman, the great-great-great grandson of Francis Lewis, the New York Signatory of the Declaration of Independence, was eager to serve. He was quick to apply to the U.S. Air Service, but was denied, due to his lack of education. Undeterred, he quickly moved to join the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps, part of the British Red Cross. The organization accepted many American volunteers to serve in France during the war, including a sixteen-year-old Walt Disney, who lied about his age to join. Wellman was then transferred to the French Foreign Legion and became the first American to join the Black Cat Squadron of the Lafayette Corps. In the second of our series on Hollywood and World War I, read how.Wellman's wartime aviation performance earned him the the nickname “Wild Bill,” a name that would follow him after the war, all the way to Hollywood., where that wartime aviation expertise would help shape the first motion picture to win the Academy Award.


Commission Announces Partnership with National History Day, Gilder-Lehrman Institute, and WWI Museum & Memorial

Education Partnership Logo

The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission announced the formation of an educational partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, National History Day (NHD), and the National World War I Museum and Memorial. This new educational program will educate both teachers, and school students, on World War I, through a series of over 100 teaching events nationwide, which will include workshops, webinars, and other means of instruction. Additional components of the program will include:

  • Integrated meetings with incorporating assets from all partners
  • Webinars
  • “Master Teacher" trainings
  • Additional content development for online, newsletter and adult programming

Read more about this new and enduring partnership to teach new generations about America in World War I.


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Remembering our World War I Veterans: Doughboy MIA with Rob Laplander

Robert Laplander

In July 6th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 79, author and Doughboy MIA managing Director Rob Laplander spoke with host Theo Mayer about his work, and the ongoing effort to locate, identify, and commemorate Americans who went missing in action during the Great War. The Doughboy MIA motto is “A man is only missing if he's forgotten.” Laplander and his team of volunteers, supported by the U.S. Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars, is not letting the World War I MIA be forgotten. Read the transcript of the interview with Robert Laplander here.

100 Cities, 100 Memorials: George Patton and the new US Tank Corps Monument

George Patton with Renault tank

In July 6th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 79, host Theo Mayer spoke with Karlen Morris, retired veteran from the Kentucky National Guard and commander of the Patton Battalion USABOT, and currently project manager for the new U.S. Tank Corps Monument, and Phil Wilburn, sergeant first class retired, also with USABOT, and a Patton Battalion board member and member of the monument committee, about George Patton and the US Tank Corps Monument in Fort Knox, Kentucky. Read a transcript of the interview here:    


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Our friends in France

Episode #80: Our Friends in France

100 Years Ago: Why America Celebrated Bastille Day | @02:05

War In The Sky: Quentin Roosevelt falls | @10:05

America Emerges: Marne and more - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:15

Great War Project: Writing WWI - Mike Shuster | @18:40

Commission News: $1.8M education partnership | @23:30

Remembering Vets: Finding you WWI Ancestors - Debra Dubek | @25:15

Stories of Service: Archiving those Stories of Service | @34:05

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Saugerties NY - Bill Payne, Vince Buono & Lisa Polay | @36:20

Speaking WWI: “Alleyman” | @43:50

WWI War Tech: Minenwerfer and Trench Mortars | @45:55

Dispatch: Newsletter highlights | @48:15

The Buzz: Selected Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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The Story of California's Muwekma Ohlone Indians in WWI

Check out this great post this week in the WWrite blog! 

In 1925, the Muwekma Ohlone Indians were erroneously declared extinct in California. 

Ethnohistorian Alan Leventhal has dedicated his life and career to correct this mistake. Don't miss WWrite's look at his work on writing and telling the story of Ohlone WWI veterans, who have proved that they have never stopped living...or fighting.


Doughboy MIA for week of Month Day

Corporal Edward Graham

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

Monday's MIA this week is Corporal Edward Graham.  Corporal Graham was born May 27th, 1889, at Burnettsville, Indiana and was a telegraph operator by trade. He enlisted in the regular army in July, 1917 and was sent to Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas in November of that year. Assigned to Company C, 5th Field Signal Battalion, he went to France in March of 1918. During the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, he served around the Montfaucon area of operations, patrolling and repairing communication wires; a particularly dangerous assignment which exposed him to regular shell fire. On October 6th, 1918, Corporal Graham was reported Missing in Action. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Polo shirt

Navy Blue Doughboy Polo Shirt

Perfect for summer! Inspired by the iconic image of an American Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA polo shirt. An informal term for a member of the U.S. Army or Marine Corps, “Doughboy” is especially used to refer to the American Expeditionary Forces in World War One. Largely comprised of young men who had dropped out of school to join the army, this poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. Shirt features: Navy with white Doughboy embroidery. 100% combed cotton pique, 6.2 oz. pre-shrunk fabric. Shirt has 3 wood-tone buttons, and side seam design for shape retention. Mens’ sizes available S – 2XL. Proceeds from the sale of this item will help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial. A Certificate of Authenticity is included.


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Samuel L. Derby 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Samuel L. Derby

 

Submitted by: Stephen Nelson

Samuel L. Derby born around 9/7/1891, Samuel Derby served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1918 and the service was completed in 1918.

 

Story of Service

Samuel L. Derby was Killed in Action in the Battle of Argonne Forest, France 1918. The Battle of Argonne was deemed the largest battle in the United States history. The battle lasted 47 days and involved 1.2 million American soldiers and over 26 thousand died.

Born on September 7, 1891. He was one of seven children of Silas and Celia (Burch) Derby. Samuel L. Derby grew up on Institute Street, Frewsburg, New York. Called Sammy, he was active in the normal activity of the time, camping, fishing and canoeing on the Conewango Creek. during Winter months he and friends would ice skate on the Conewango flats or coast on the nearby snow-covered hills.

The coming year of 1917, America entered the World War and for the boys, the carefree days were at an end. All through that summer, fall and following winter the boys of Frewsburg were leaving for army camps. Sammy had graduated from Frewsburg Schools and worked at a local furniture factory until he joined the Army.

Read Samuel L. Derby's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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July 10, 2018

Bells of Peace reverse

From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

An interview with Bells of Peace Program Coordinator Betsy Anderson

Betsy Anderson

Bells of Peace, A World War I Remembrance is a collaborative program to bring the Centennial of the Armistice to communities and organizations across the nation, in a grassroots program to encourage the tolling of bells, and other commemorative activities, throughout  the United States on Sunday, November 11th, 2018 at 11 a.m. local time. Bells of Peace brings attention to the end of the fighting in World War I at the 11th Hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, a hundred years ago. In June 29th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 78, Program Coordinator Betsy Anderson spoke with host Theo Mayer about Bells of Peace, touching on the historical background and purpose of the initiative, as well as how people can participate. Read a transcript of this enlightening interview here.


Soldiers celebrate July 4 1918

How Doughboys in 1918 Celebrated Independence Day on July 4 in France

July 4th, 1918: Imagine yourself, an American, on the streets of Paris. Crowds bustle and cheer in excitement as you march past them. Even though you have yet to fight you feel triumphant, as if the battle has already been won. The American and French flags fly in unison high above you and in the air the scent of American food cooking smells delicious. A French child gives you a flower as you march by, a symbol of gratitude for fighting as an ally. Back home it is Independence Day, but in this foreign land you are joined in celebration. WW1CC intern Joseph Vesper takes a look back at how Doughboys all over France, in events large and small, observed American Independence on July 4, 1918.


ABMC Releases New Video about Suresnes American Cemetery near Paris

Suresnes American Cemetery

Suresnes American Cemetery, located just outside of Paris, is one of nine World War I cemeteries managed by the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC). Created due to its proximity to American Expeditionary Forces’ hospital centers in and near the Paris area, Suresnes American Cemetery includes the remains of many Americans who died from injury or illness during the war. ABMC has released a new video presentation titled "Suresnes American Cemetery: America’s WWI Cemetery Near Paris" to tell more about the cemetery and its history. Click here to learn more, and view the new ABMC video.


Getting to Know A WWI Serviceman

Patrick Gregory

 

Author Patrick Gregory describes how he came to write the memoir An American on the Western Front with Elizabeth Nurser, and the bond he feels with the young man at its heart, a young man who carried his country’s first official flag to Europe in 1917 and served first in the ambulance corps and then as a fighter pilot, flying with both the French and US Air Services. Arthur Clifford Kimber was 21 when he set off for France in 1917 and just 22 when he died. Kimber agreed to write letters from the moment he left home, as often and as detailed as he could manage, and all 160 letters he sent survived the war--though Kimber did not. Through a family connection, Gregory has helped an absent Kimber give us a unique window on 1917 and 1918 in wartime Europe by combining his personal story with the bigger picture: the wider panorama of America’s war. Read more about how An American on the Western Front came to be written, and the profound messages it has for the 21st Century from a fallen American in WWI.

 


Battle of Hamel helped kindle "100 Years of Mateship" between Australia and US

Illinois and Australian soldiers at Hamel

One hundred years ago last week, members of the Illinois National Guard’s 33rd Division were fighting side by side with Australian troops in the Battle of Hamel. The fight in northern France was the 33rd’s first offensive in World War I, and the combination of eager Guardsmen and experienced Australians proved to be a winning combination.Last week the Illinois State Military Museum held an educational event on the Battle of Hamel and World War I, with military re-enactors and a talk on the battle complete with historic pictures, and an Australian deputy consul-general in attendance.  Read more about this commemorative event and the Illinois-Australia connection here.

Wright-Patterson event

In June, another event celebrated “‘100 years of Mateship”’ between Australia and the United States at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. Replica World War I aircraft and a display of World War I equipment and weaponry were the highlights of a commemoration and celebration, with an address by a Royal Australian Air Force representative. Read more about this event which honored all U.S. service personnel and welcomed special guests who had a connection with the Australian military


Immigrants played big WWI role for USA

Gordon Morse

Gordon C. Morse, writing in The Virginian-Pilot newspaper recently, makes the observation that "It may have happened 100 years ago, but the more time you spend with the first world war, the more it closes in on the present." Starting with a look at the issue of immigration in the early 20th century (which certainly has resonance in the early 21st), Morse comes to the clear understanding that "To grasp the war’s reality and its consequences is to learn that no sentient American should go about the day without understanding that WWI puts in motion the present role of the federal government, the responsibilities of global leadership, and the vast material cost of it all." Click here to read the entire thoughtful and informative article about the significance of WWI to the USA.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

WW1 era George S. Patton

Episode #79
July 1918 Overview  

100 Years ago: July 1918 overview - Theo Mayer, Katherine Akey & Dr. Edward Lengel | @02:10

Great War Project: Changing Landscape of the War - Mike Shuster | @18:15

Commission News: Armistice Centennial Participation App | @22:25

Remembering Veterans: Doughboy MIA - Rob Laplander | @ 23:35

Spotlight on the Media: Lost Voices - Michael Collins and Martin King | @31:05

Speaking WW1: Zero Hour | @36:20

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Patton and the US Tank Corps Project - Karlen Morris & Sgt. Phil Wilburn | @ 38:05

WW1 Tech: Trench Club | @43:30

Articles & Posts from the Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @45:35 

The Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @48:20


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Yoga and Animals: Inspiration for WWI Poetry

This week, Wrrite features the inspired poetry of Jane Satterfield, whose father is a Desert Storm veteran. 

Satterfield’s poetry and prose have appeared in American Poetry Review, Antioch Review, The Common, Crazyhorse, North American Review, Notre Dame Review, Pleiades, and many more, as well as on Verse Daily and Poetry Daily. The daughter of an American airman and a British mother, she grew up near Andrews Air Force Base in suburban Maryland.

Don't miss this unique post about yoga as a space for reflection and creation about war. Namaste.


Doughboy MIA for week of July 9

Lee Winslow

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private Lee G. WinslowBorn August 21st, 1897, Private Winslow was a farmer in Fairmont, Indiana when he was drafted on March 28th, 1918. He was trained at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri and Washington Barracks, Washington, D.C. From there he went to Camp Merritt, New Jersey, where he received training with the Engineer Corps. Assigned to Company F, 1st Replacement Regiment, Engineers, and went to France in May, 1918. ‘Over There’ he was transferred to Company E, 2nd Engineers and was killed in action by shell fire on October 3rd, 1918 at Somme Py. His remains were never identified. 

Would you like to help us solve this case? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise:

A Silent Night

A Silent Night: A WWI Memorial in Song

The pieces of music you will hear on this disc are, in a sense, living artifacts of the WWI era, Despite the vast contrast in style among the various composers, almost every piece was composed within the ten-year period between 1912 and 1922.  The poetry and the music itself is infused with the emotions of the war, from vengeful violence to solemn mourning, to desperate calls for peace. The Washington Post wrote of this collection that "This recital was so different - so refreshingly, marvelously different...The goal of a recital is not originality as much as making a statement as an artist. And at this, Brancy and Dugan succeeded superbly."

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

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Herbert James

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Herbert James

 

Submitted by: Harry L. James {Great Nephew}

Herbert James born around 1895. Herbert James served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Herbert James was born on January 13th, 1895 in Bethlehem, Kentucky. In September of 1917 he was drafted into the Army at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky.

From September of 1917 to July of 1918 he passed through a series of training units starting at Camp Taylor then Camp Shelby in Mississippi as part of a Regular Army round out of a National Guard Division. At Camp Shelby Herbert along with 1000 other soldiers were then formed into Replacement Companies and transferred to Camp Merritt, New Jersey where they departed for France on the 11th of June, 1917 on the SS Corsican. 

The Corsican docked in Liverpool, England on the 24th of June. From there Herbert and his fellow soldiers were sent on a troop train to Southhampton and finally to combat training at the Depot Division, St. Aignan France. Once he completed his final training he was assigned to the 4th Infantry Regiment, 5th Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division on the 26th of July, 1918.

Read Herbert James's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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July 3, 2018 

Marines in Paris July 4, 1918

Belleau Wood attained iconic status for the USMC via training, luck, post-war focus, and a Paris parade on July 4, 1918

A massively-attended parade through Paris on July 4, 1918 featuring the United States Marines fresh from the victory in Belleau Wood was a catalytic component in the building of the battle's legend that still informs the USMC consciousness one hundred years later. Tony Perry, long-time reporter for the Los Angeles Times who made multiple trips to Iraq and Afghanistan during his writing career, considers, in an exclusive article for the US World War Centennial web site, how the Battle of Belleau Wood attained its iconic status for the Marines. A reporter at the right place at the right time, an aggressive fighting spirit, and an understanding by the USMC leadership of the power of the event, combined to give Belleau Wood a fame, and a legacy, that other battles, larger and possibly more consequential, would not achieve. Read more about how the Marines parading through Paris on July 4, 1918 played a powerful part in making the Belleau Wood story one that shaped both the public perception of the Marine Corps then, and the Marines’ view of themselves since.


100-year-old Harley-Davidson returns from France to honor American WWI vets

Harley-Davidson motorcycle

A lot of American motorcycles will be cruising the nation's highways on July 4, but one will be a very special ride indeed. One of the last an estimated 20,000 olive green Harley-Davidson motorcycles used by American soldiers in the Great War has come home again. The Model J and its sidecar rolled onto American soil for the first time in a century, kick-starting a nationwide repatriation tour, with a pair of Frenchmen planning on  riding from Alabama to Florida, up to Wisconsin, and west to California in the refurbished antique. The purpose of the road trip: to Americans who laid down their lives in WWI 100 years ago to assist the French. Read more about and see the Fox News video of the incredible vintage Harley and the French duo's ambitious tour agenda here.


Historic fireboat in NYC turned into Floating Work of WWI-inspired Art

Dazzle ship

A historic fireboat docked along the Hudson River has been turned into a floating work of art. The boat is covered in a wild plant design that likely saved lives during World War I. You can’t miss the John J. Harvey Fireboat, painted in bright red and white, in a new art exhibition co-commissioned by the Public Art Fund and 14-18 NOW. The painting technique is called “dazzle,” developed in WWI to protect thousands of war ships and passenger vessels with a unique camouflage. Read more about how the creators of this eye-catching artifact hope to connect New Yorkers to WWI history.


Navy Cross Nurses: Inspiring Heroism During the Influenza Epidemic of 1918

nurse grave

On May 13, 1908, the first twenty Navy Nurses were accepted into service, little knowing that less than ten years later it would be wartime service. The "Sacred Twenty" were the core of the Navy Nurse Corps throughout World War One, and several received the Navy Cross--and several died in service. WW1CC Intern Miranda Halpin takes a look at how two Navy nurses fought against the great flu epidemic of 1918, and became its victims themselves.


Warriors in Khaki: Wyoming Indian Doughboys who served in World War I

Corporal Thomas Daniel Saunders

The Wyoming Veterans Memorial Museum opened the Cowboy State’s Centennial Exhibit on “Wyoming in the Great War” on April 6, 2017. Among the myriad topics studied in preparation for this exhibit, was the service of Wyoming Indians in the Great War, particularly from the Arapaho and Shoshone Nations on the Wind River Reservation. Doing research for the upcoming exhibit, museum Curator Douglas R. Cubbison encountered evidence that  the role played by Indian Doughboys from Wyoming was greater than was then understood. In an exclusive article, Cubbison identifies six Indian Doughboys from Wyoming, by name, that the Museum has identified to date. But one of the Wyoming Indian Doughboys was already well known: Corporal Thomas Daniel Saunders not only served with great distinction in combat during the way, but also played a prominent role in establishing one of America's most solemn military traditions after the war ended.


“I Hate To Write” gives a NY mother's perspective on the cataclysm of WWI

I Hate to Write

“I Hate To Write” is the story of author Paul White's great grandmother Edith Agnes MacDonald McCormick, an Irish immigrant, and a mother raising three sons in NYC in the early 1900’s through WWI. Edith is a woman of courage and fortitude and through her “Record”, she provides a compelling, extraordinarily personal glimpse into NYC family life, but also the events occurring at the turn of the century through the cataclysmic changes of the early 20th century and WWI. Why the title “I Hate to Write”? Because these three words begin Edith’s diary and though she may say she hates to write, she writes marvelously. This is a story of family, courage, faith, war and terrible personal loss. Read more about this first-person memoir of service and tragic loss in WWI here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify  listen on Youtube. New - Comment and ask questions via twitter @TheWW1podcast

Uncle Sam 4th of July 1918 poster

Episode #78

Highlights:
4th of July, 1918

100 Years ago: 4th of July, 1918 | @02:00

Great War Project: Chaos at all ends - Mike Shuster | @12:05

America Emerges: Capturing Vaux - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:15

Commission News: Bells of Peace - Betsy Anderson | @20:55

Historian Corner: WWI Shaping the 20th Century - Dr. Jay Winter | @27:00

State Update: CT WWI History Project - Christine Pittsley | @33:30

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Governors Island - Kevin Fitzpatrick & Maj. Jared Nichols | @39:05

Speaking WWI: War Effort | @46:25

Articles & Posts from the Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @47:45

The Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:55


From the World War I Centennial News Podcast

Historian Corner:

Dr. Jay Winter: the Cultural Impact of World War I

Dr. Jay Winter

In June 29th's WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 78, renowned historian and author Dr. Jay Winter, the Charles J. Stille professor of History Emeritus at Yale University, and the author of numerous books on the cultural impact of World War I on the 20th century, spoke with host Theo Mayer about the profound cultural impact of World War I, particularly on remembrance and war memorial design. Click here for a transcript of the insightful interview.

Historian Corner:

Teddy Roosevelt and the First World War

Teddy Roosevelt

In June 22nd’s WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 77, Historian David Pietrusza, the author of the book: TR's Last War - Theodore  Roosevelt, The Great War and a Journey of Triumph and Tragedy, spoke with host Theo Mayer about Theodore Roosevelt, his role in World War I, and the suffering that the war ultimately inflicted on the former President and his family. Click here for the transcript of an absorbing interview.

War Tech:

War on Ice: inside the Marmolada glacier

Ice City

Also in the June 22nd WW1 Centennial News Podcast, Episode 77, host Theo Mayer describes the “Ice City”, a refuge and network of tunnels carved within a glacier by the Austro-Hungarian army to avoid both Italian fire and the unstable environment of alpine warfare, where hypothermia, frostbite and rock slides were almost as dangerous as the soldiers of the other army. Click here to get the cold, hard facts about an amazing adaptation to impossible conditions in a transcript of the "Ice City" segment.


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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Dead on the 4th of July: Poet Alan Seeger

By Adin Dobkin

This Independence Holiday, WWrite focuses on American poet Alan Seeger, who perished during the Battle of the Somme in 1916. It is said that he continued to sing a patriotic marching song as he lay wounded and dying, troops passing him by. Read the article in the WWrite Blog!


Doughboy MIA for week of July 2

Private John A. Dike

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.  

Monday's MIA this week is Private John A. Dike. Born December 22nd, 1886, Private Dike was a farmer in Gibson County, Indiana when he enlisted in the army on October 14th, 1917. He took his training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi with the 5th Company, 1st Training Regiment before being assigned to Company E, 335th Regiment, He landed in France in June, 1918 and was assigned to Company L, 166th Infantry of the now famous 42nd ‘Rainbow’ Division. He was killed on July 19th, 1918. Buried in an AEF temporary cemetery, his remains were never identified and he is believed to be in a grave marked ‘Unknown’. He was the first man from Gibson County, Indiana to die in the war.

Would you like to help us solve this case?  Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise 1

Lest We Forget jacket

 

"Lest We Forget: The Great War"

World War I Prints from the Pritzker Military Museum & Library As the United States commemorates the centennial of World War I, one of the nation’s premier military history institutions pays tribute to the Americans who served and the allies they fought beside to defeat a resourceful enemy with a lavishly illustrated book.  It is an official product of the United States World War One Centennial Commission. The story of WWI is told through the memorable art it spawned―including posters from nations involved in the conflict―and a taut narrative account of the war’s signal events, its major personalities and its tragic consequences; and the timely period photographs that illustrate the awful realities of this revolutionary conflict. Most importantly, this book is a tribute to those who served in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and what would become the Air Force. Proceeds from the sale of this book help fund the WW1 Memorial in Washington, DC. 

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Emmett George Hoyt

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

Emmett George Hoyt

Submitted by: Joe Davis {Nephew}

Emmett George Hoyt was born around 1895. Emmett Hoyt served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service

Emmett George Hoyt was inducted into the army on May 31, 1917 and was a Private in Company M, 110th Infantry, 28th Division, Pennsylvania National Guard. His company sailed to France on the transport ship Ansonia on May 3, 1918. He saw action in France at Cierges hill 212 and two major offensives. 

He spent 57 days in the Argonne, and on June 30, he was sent to Aisne Marne, where, on July 30, he was “moderately” wounded when he was peppered with shrapnel, mostly in his legs. He was carrying a tin of tobacco in his breast pocket over his heart and credited "Prince Albert" with saving his life.

Six months after being wounded, Emmett was assigned to a Military Police unit in Cologne, Germany, for a short time before returning to France. He departed St. Nazaire, on 29 April 1919 on the transport ship Santa Olivia with the remaining members of Company M.

Read Emmett George Hoyt's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here. 


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June 26, 2018 

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US World War I Commission announces 'Bells of Peace' for Armistice Centennial 

The World War One Centennial Commission, along with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, the American Legion, and Veterans of Foreign Wars, have announced Bells of Peace: A World War One Remembrance, a collaborative program to toll bells in communities across the United States twenty-one times on Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local time.  Bells will be tolled in places of worship, schools, town halls, public carillons, and cemeteries. This nationwide program is designed to honor those American men and women who served one hundred years ago, during World War One, in which an armistice agreement between the warring countries at 11 a.m. on November 11th, 1918, ended the fighting in Europe. The World War I Centennial Commission has created a page on its website: ww1cc.org/bells where people can find information and tools to conduct the bell tolling, and to commemorate meaningfully the service of their local World War One veterans. Read more about this nationwide commemorative program here.


Starbucks Chairman co-hosts NYC event to support National WWI Memorial in DC

Schultz

On Monday, June 18th, Starbucks Chairman Howard Schultz endorsed the new National WWI Memorial in Washington DC, by headlining an event on the USS Intrepid Air, Sea and Space Museum in New York City. As keynote speaker, he stated "America honors veterans of every major war with a National Memorial in Washington, DC except one, World War I. Thanks to the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, we will finally honor our World War I veterans, a tribute long overdue". Schultz is the son of a former U.S Army veteran. During his tenure, the Starbucks company has been a major supporter of veterans issues, and veteran hiring. Read more about this big event here, and see our Podcast section below for links to audio clips from Schultz's speech in Episode 77.


National History Day Awards National Prizes for WWI-themed Student Projects

National History Day winners

This year's National History Day Contest was special for the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, because, for the second year in a row, we were able to sponsor special prizes for student projects on the theme of World War I. The WW1CC's World War I prize is awarded to an outstanding entry in both the junior and senior divisions that documents and analyzes a significant aspect of World War I, clearly demonstrating historical relevance to the theme of World War I. Read more about National History Day and see the winners of the WW1CC competition here.


C-SPAN's American History TV airs tour of Library of Congress WWI Exhibits

CSPAN

This coming weekend, C-SPAN's American History TV will show a special tour of the Library of Congress exhibit “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I”. Library of Congress historian and curator Ryan Reft gives a tour of the exhibit, tracing the history of U.S. participation in World War I using artwork, posters, photographs, films, sheet music, documents, and artifacts. "Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I" examines the upheaval of world war as Americans confronted it— both at home and abroad. Read more about this C-SPAN special programming here.


Sagamore Hill commemorates Quentin Roosevelt & WWI with exhibit, programs

Quentin Roosevelt

Quentin Roosevelt, Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest child, was an aviator who fought in the skies above France during World War I. One hundred years ago, on July 14, 1918, Quentin was killed in action. This summer, Sagamore Hill National Historical Site will present a temporary museum exhibit at Old Orchard to commemorate the centennial of Quentin’s death, as well as a number of special programs throughout the month of July. Visitors can immerse themselves in the sights and sounds of World War I while taking photos with Quentin and his training plane. Read more about this National Park Service production here.


Attack on Orleans: the only time the continental US took enemy fire in WWI

Jake Klim

Television producer Jake Klim, a native of Cape Cod, MA, grew up knowing vaguely about the day in 1918 that German submarine U-156 surfaced from the depths off the coast of Nauset Beach, and started firing her deck gun at a tugboat and her string of four barges. But it wasn't until 2012, after a lifetime of interest in WWI, that it occurred to Klim that someone should write a book about the event -- and that the "someone" was him. His book Attack on Orleans: The World War I Submarine Raid on Cape Cod is now available from The History Press. In this thoughtful article, Klim talks about the origins of the book, and some of the extraordinary things his research turned up about the all-but-unknown event of 100 years ago.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

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The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Howard Schultz speaks on the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC

Episode 77
Highlights:
Howard Schultz on the National WWI Memorial 

The battle on the Italian Front: Piave | @01:45

Germany low on resources and morale - Mike Shuster | @06:30

The untold story of Hill 204 - Dr. Edward Lengel | @10:20

SPECIAL: Howard Schultz on the National WWI Memorial | @16:10

Historian Corner: President Teddy Roosevelt - David Pietrusza | @36:55

Speaking WWI: Tailspin | @43:40

WWI War Tech: Ice City | @45:15

Buzz: WWI in social media - Katherine Akey | @48:20


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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"Hill 145” is the winner of Consequence Magazine's 2017 Prize in Fiction

New WWI fiction! How has agony been rendered so gracefully? This is the question asked by the narrator in the Ruth Edgett's short story, “Hill 145,” as he gazes up at a WWI memorial. "Hill 145,” the winner of Consequence Magazine's 2017 Prize in Fiction, brings us to 1936 as Canadian WWI veterans return to the French battleground that cost their country 3,598 lives. This week, WWrite features: 
"Hill 145," a story that illuminates the ways war veterans are “well-practiced at moving between worlds” when reconciling their soldiering pasts and civilian presents. Not to miss!


Doughboy MIA for week of June 25

James Jewell

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Private First Class James Jewell, born 25 April 1893 in Silver Plume, Colorado. There he ranched on his father’s property until moving to Denver and, two years later, to McGill, Nevada. After America declared war, Jewell travelled to San Diego to enlist in the Navy. Rejected because he was too thin for his height, Jewell returned to McGill and his job at the Nevada Consolidated Copper Company to await other developments. On 5 October 1917 he was drafted into the army and went to Camp Lewis in Washington state to train with the 41st Division. With them he travelled to England, landing on Christmas Eve, 1917 and heading across the English Channel to France three days later. On 8 January 1918 he was assigned to Company H, 16th Infantry, 1st Division. That spring, he went into action with his unit on 28 May 1918 in America’s first ever offensive assault, against the town of Cantigny, where PFC Jewell made a good accounting of himself. It was following this action, but in the same sector, that during a heavy bombardment of his unit’s lines by German artillery that PFC Jewell was struck by shell fragments and killed instantly. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help solve the case of PFC Jewell? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandise

Flag

Fly the WW1 Centennial Flag on July 4th this year!

 

On December 19, 2014, Congress passed legislation designating Pershing Park in the District of Columbia as a national World War One Memorial. The Act authorizes the World War One Centennial Commission to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War One by developing the Pershing Park Site.

This WW1 Centennial Flag is made of durable nylon and measures 3'x5'.  This flag has the iconic Doughboy silhouette digitally screened onto it and has 2 brass grommets to hang the flag.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item are designated for this endeavor. You can show your support, and help promote the efforts, by proudly displaying your custom flag.A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Katherine Rose Kreutzer

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Katherine Rose Kreutzer

 

Submitted by: Mary Rohrer Dexter 

Katherine Rose Kreutzer served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The dates of service are: Known 3/1918 - 4/1919.

April of 1918 was rainy in Southwestern Ohio, with temperatures which ranged in the upper forties to lower fifties, as 30-year-old Katherine Rose Kreutzer arrived at Wilbur Wright Field, Fairborn, Ohio. Pulling her cape around her more closely while shivering in the biting wind, she stepped into a new juncture of her life. She was beginning her period as an Army Corps Nurse. 

Wilbur Wright Field was a new base. The land had only been acquired one year prior to her arrival. The hospital building construction had started in July of 1917, but an adequate amount of additions to the original structure were not in place until March of 1918. During the construction phase, civilian workers and their families camped in the area, as were the teams of animals used in the construction work. Conditions were very unsanitary. The stench of many pit privies combined with large amounts of animal manure caused the area to become infested with flies and the drinking water became contaminated.

Read Katherine Rose Kreutzer's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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June 19, 2018

The Father of Father’s Day: American Celebration of Fatherhood During WWI

Stars and Stripes

Have you ever wondered about the history of Father’s Day? There was no federally recognized Father’s Day in America during the time of World War I. It was not until 1972, when President Richard Nixon signed a proclamation that the third Sunday in June was to be designated as the official holiday. During World War I, however, various communities in 1917-1918 did celebrate a day dedicated to fathers. WW1CC Intern Joseph Vesper explores how today's salute to America's dad's got its start in WWI, including the push led by The Stars and Stripes newspaper.


"I knew I wanted to dig deeper into this decades-long relationship."

Jenifer Burckett-Picker

Jenifer Burckett-Picker was going through a small trunk that was “cluttering the basement area” that her husband wanted to use for his hobbies, and found a treasure trove: her dad’s WWI memorabilia. In it was the revolver (with no bullets in the barrel), WWI victory medals attesting to her dad’s participation in both the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne Offensives, old maps of the Western Front in the area of Verdun, the khaki army hat and shirt, her dad’s Army discharge papers, and a small, partially disintegrated, brittle envelope with something inside. What she found inside that old envelope led her to travel to France twice, and to write a book: Dad and Dunk in the Great WarRead how her offhand discovery changed Jenifer's life, and quite literally put her into her dad's WWI footsteps.


PBS/American Experience re-airing The Great War documentary series this week

The Great War

Great news for the World War I community. The ground-breaking documentary series, THE GREAT WAR, will re-air on PBS stations across the country, with the first episode airing today, April 19.

Here is the replay schedule:

  • Episode 1 will air on June 19 at 9/8c
  • Episode 2 on June 26 at 9/8c, and
  • Episode 3 on July 3 at 9/8c.

All three episodes will be available for free streaming starting June 19 at 9 pm EST through July 30. Read more about the replay of this epic WWI documentary series this week.


Educational Poster Series Tells Story of DHS Agencies' Service in World War I

DHS

Even though the U.S. Department of Homeland Security wasn't established until 2002, the department has some real connection to World War I. As part of the ongoing commemoration of the World War I Centennial, the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office and Library has initiated a collaborative Department of Homeland Security project to create an educational poster series, illustrating the roles of DHS’s legacy agencies during WWI. The five free posters in the series aim to raise awareness about the significant history and heritage of DHS while honoring the nation’s participation in WWI. Find out more about these great educational posters, and download your own copies.


Honoring “Detroit’s Own”: Polar Bear Memorial Association’s World War I Centennial Commemoration

339th Infantry Leaves for Russia

Polar bears are known for their ability to survive and thrive in the most adverse conditions, all while being regarded as the tundra's most fierce predator. In a similar fashion, the American North Russia Expeditionary Forces (ANREF) in Russia were revered for being as resilient as polar bears. The men of the ANREF fought the newly formed Red Army while simultaneously battling the Russian winter’s sub-zero temperatures. These men and their stories have nearly been forgotten, but because of the incredible work of the Polar Bear Memorial Association, Americans are beginning to learn more about The United States’ intervention into the Russian Civil War. WW1CC Intern Will Kaiser spoke to Mike Grobbel, President of the Polar Bear Memorial Association, about the WWI Polar Bear Expedition, about his commemoration organization, and about their activities.


WWI and WWII Tourism Marketing Grants are open again -- Up to $10,000 available

Virginia Commission

Virginia World War I and World War II Tourism Marketing Program Applications are now open! Deadline is Tuesday, August 7, 2018 by 5:00 PM. The Virginia Tourism Corporation (VTC) and the World War I and World War II Commemoration Commission (the Commission) announce that applications are now available for the Virginia World War I and World War II Tourism Marketing Program grants.The grants are intended to help facilitate programs and events that will honor WWI and WWII veterans not only from Virginia, but across the country. Read more about this WWI centennial commemoration grant opportunity here.


WWI Centennial NEWS Podcast

Podcast Logo

The WW1 Centennial News Podcast is about WW1 THEN: 100 years ago this week, and it's about WW1 NOW: News and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.  

Available on our web siteiTunesGoogle Play, PodbeanTuneInStitcher Radio on Demand.  Spotify NEW Now listen on Youtube.

Looking over to Belleau Wood

Episode #76
Highlights: The Battle of Belleau Wood

The Battle of Belleau Wood - Mike Shuster | @02:15

June 11 Breakthrough at Belleau Wood - Dr. Edward Lengel | @06:00

The birth of the modern US Marine Corps - Alan Axelrod | @10:05

War in The sky: The Ace who ran Pan Am | @16:45

Historian Corner: The Dept. of State in WWI - Thomas Faith | @18:25

100 Cities / 100 Memorials: San Francisco - Ken Maley | @25:55

Speaking WWI: Boot Camp | @32:00

WWI War Tech: Submarine | @34:00

Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Highlights | @37:50

Social Media - Katherine Akey | @43:50


Wwrite Blog Post This Week

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The Roots of Contemporary War Literature in James Joyce’s Ulysses

What do contemporary war writers discuss when they talk about WWI? James Joyce's epic work, Ulysses,of course. This week on WWrite, Afghanistan veteran, Peter Molin, lets us listen in on a conversation among some of the most important voices in war writing today. Not to miss!


Doughboy MIA for week of June 18

Doughboy Grave Silhouette

A man is only missing if he is forgotten.

 

Monday's MIA this week is Pvt. Frederick Bullers, born in What Cheer, Iowa in March, 1894 and enlisted at Jarbridge, Nevada on 7 September 1917. He trained as part of the 362nd Infantry, 91st Division. Thereafter he was then transferred to the 164th infantry, 41st Division with whom he went to France in December, 1917. In France the 41st Division was used a replacement pool and Private Bullers was sent to Company D, 26th Infantry, 1st Division. He saw considerable action with the 26th throughout all of 1918, including that famous first fight at Cantigny and the St. Mihiel Offensive. Going into combat with them again on 1 October 1918, this time into the Meuse-Argonne to replace the wrecked 35th Division, Private Bullers was Killed in Action two days later in the heavy fighting northeast of the little town of Apremont. The army was unable to locate any relatives of his save for one brother, Charles. Nothing further is known at this time.

Would you like to help solve the case of Private Bullers? Give 'Ten For Them' to Doughboy MIA and help us make a full accounting of the 4,423 American service personnel still listed as missing in action from WW1. Make your tax deductible donation now, with our thanks.


Official WWI Centennial Merchandis

Hat

Inspired by the iconic image of a U.S. Doughboy, you can wear your American pride with this Made in the USA hat. The poignant lone silhouette of a soldier in trench warfare serves as a reminder of those who sacrificed so much one century ago. The Navy hat with white Doughboy embroidery is a 100% cotton, structured with contrasting pancake visor, sweatband and taping, and pre-curved bill. The velcro closure features U.S. flag emblem. A Certificate of Authenticity as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial is included. Order your Doughboy Commemorative hat here.

This and many other items are available as Official Merchandise of the United States World War One Centennial.  Proceeds from the Official WWI Centennial Merchandise help to fund the building of the national World War One Memorial in Washington, D.C.


Take advantage of the
Matching Donation by the
Pritzker Military Museum and Library

Double Your Donation - Soldiers


Douglas Mellen Burckett 

A Story of Service from the Stories of Service section of ww1cc.org

 

Douglas Mellen Burckett

 

Submitted by: Jenifer Burckett-Picker {daughter}

 

 

Douglas Mellen Burckett born around 1895, Douglas Burckett served in World War 1 with the United States Army. The enlistment was in 1917 and the service was completed in 1919.

Story of Service 

My father, Douglas Mellen Burckett, was born in Brooklyn in 1895 and grew up in Montclair and Somerville, New Jersey. After finishing high school, plus a couple of years of military academy, he enrolled in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the fall of 1915 to study electrical engineering.

After his sophomore year, in the fall of 1917, he enlisted in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF). He was in Wagon Company #3 of the 23rd Engineers Regiment and spent his first almost five months at various training camps in Maryland (Camp Meade, Camp Glen Burnie, and Camp Laurel). At Camp Meade, he met his lifelong friend, George W. Duncan “Dunk”, from Missoula, Montana.

Dad and Dunk shipped over from Hoboken, NJ to Brest France in early April 1918 on the U.S.S. George Washington. They spent just over a week in Brest at Camp Pontanezen, before entraining to Nevers in central France, where they spent the next almost four months working on the most important American railroad project in France in WWI – unheard of and forgotten today, but of vital strategic importance to the war effort – the Nevers Cut-Off (or as the French called it “La ligne americaine”).

Read Douglas Mellen Burckett's entire Story of Service here.

Submit your family's Story of Service here.


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