transition01.jpg
transition03.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-3.jpg
Belvedere-to-Sculpture.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-1.jpg
Rendering-2.jpg
Rendering-3A.jpg
Rendering-4.jpg
Rendering-5.jpg
Terrace-Planters2.jpg
_P3_3855_250118-Edit_250118.jpg
_P3_3934_250118_250118.jpg
_P3_3941_250118_250118.jpg
previous arrow
next arrow

 

369th homecomingThe 369th Infantry Division Band forms up to participate in an American Expeditionary Force homecoming parade in New York City in 1919.

 Lawmakers push for a World War I medal review to ensure minorities get the recognition they deserve

By Haley Britzky
via the taskandpurpose.com web site

House lawmakers are pushing for a Pentagon review of valor awards given out for service in World War I to ensure that minorities are getting the recognition they deserve.

Draft language of the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act from the House Armed Services Committee, unveiled on Monday, pushes for the Defense Department to "review the service records of certain African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, Jewish American, and Native American war veterans to ensure that minority service members are appropriately recognized for their valorous service."

In the Senate, a standalone bill was introduced in April by Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), which calls for service secretaries to conduct a similar review of veterans of their branch. It has received bipartisan support, though a spokesperson for Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), who is a cosponsor, told Task & Purpose that the language is not yet in the Senate's version of the NDAA, but could be added later.

Communications director for Van Hollen, Bridgett Frey, told Task & Purpose that the senator "continues to work with Senate leadership to push for passage of this important bipartisan legislation."

To be eligible for the review, according to the Senate's legislation, the veteran must have been awarded either the Distinguished Service Cross or the Navy Cross for action; the Croix de Guerre with Palm by the French government; or been recommended for a Medal of Honor for action taken between April 6, 1917 and November 11, 1918.

The House Armed Services Committee's draft language lays out the same eligibility requirements, and says the service secretaries should consult with the Valor Medals Review Task Force, and other veteran organizations that the Secretary deems appropriate.

Read the entire article on the Task and Purpose web site.

External Web Site Notice: This page contains information directly presented from an external source. The terms and conditions of this page may not be the same as those of this website. Click here to read the full disclaimer notice for external web sites. Thank you.