fbpx
transition01.jpg
transition03.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-3.jpg
Belvedere-to-Sculpture.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-1.jpg
Rendering-2.jpg
Rendering-3A.jpg
Rendering-4.jpg
Rendering-5.jpg
Terrace-Planters2.jpg
_P3_3855_250118-Edit_250118.jpg
_P3_3934_250118_250118.jpg
_P3_3941_250118_250118.jpg
previous arrow
next arrow
maquette0.jpg
maquette2.jpg
overhead.jpg
Belvedere-to-Sculpture.jpg
Rendering-5.jpg
Flagstaff-from-South-Terrace.jpg
sabin3.jpg
sabin2.jpg
sabin12.jpg
wide-shot.jpg
armature-3.jpg
armature-1.jpg
armature-4.jpg
previous arrow
next arrow

 

womens suffrage 19th amendment 1600Equal Suffrage League of Richmond, Va. in front of Washington Monument, Capitol Square, Richmond. The members of the ESL were promoting the suffrage film, "Your Girl and Mine." (Credit: Adèle Goodman Clark Papers, Special Collections and Archives, VCU Libraries./Wikimedia Commons) 

WWI changed public attitude about women’s suffrage 

By Melissa De Witte-Stanford
via the Futurity web site

While American women had been fighting for the right to vote for decades prior to the ratification of the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920, it was not until World War I that their cause for political independence regained momentum, argues legal scholar Pamela S. Karlan.

“Suffragists conscripted rhetorical claims advanced in favor of the war, and pointed to women’s key role on the home front, to bolster their arguments in favor of domestic expansion of voting rights,” says Karlan,. “Times of crisis can be opportunities to make real progress.”

While white women have encountered few legal obstacles to voting since the amendment’s ratification, however, Black Americans have endured persistent racial discrimination—despite the 15th Amendment’s parallel prohibition denying citizens the right to vote on account of race or color.

Here, Karlan discusses what the 19th Amendment accomplished and the challenges that persist today:

Read the entire article on the Futurity web site.

External Web Site Notice: This page contains information directly presented from an external source. The terms and conditions of this page may not be the same as those of this website. Click here to read the full disclaimer notice for external web sites. Thank you.

 

"Pershing" Donors

$5 Million +


Founding Sponsor
PritzkerMML Logo


Starr Foundation Logo


The Lilly Endowment