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Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Memorial Hunters Club

We are building a US WW1 Memorial register through a program called the Memorials Hunters Club. If you locate a memorial that is not on the map we invite you to upload your treasure to be permanently archived in the national register.  You can include your choice of your real name, nickname or team name as the explorers who added that memorial to the register. We even have room for a selfie! Check the map, and if you don't see the your memorial CLICK THE LINK TO ADD IT.

100 Cities - 100 Memorials

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  • Materials (select all that apply): Metal (any)
  • Battle of Argonne
  • Argonne and Chateau Thierry Barracks was built and opened in 1919 honoring the American contributions in WWI named after two battles where American soldiers and Marines contributed to major victories in Flanders
  • Memorial building
101 Court Square
72042 DeWitt
AR
USA

No additional information at this time.

Arlington National Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 400,000 active duty service members, veterans and their families. Service to country is the common thread that binds all who are remembered and honored at Arlington.

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Memorial Hunter: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
1 Tonasket Shop Road
98855 Tonasket
WA
USA

This memorial is part of the US Armed Forces Legacy Park, which honors veterans from every US war. The park also contains a plaque wall listing names of servicemembers from WWI as well as the Civil War, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Vaughan Dan
Foot Bridge Road
04915 Belfast
ME
USA

The Armistice Bridge was rebuilt in 2006 replacing the crumbling Memorial Bridge that was built-in 1921 and dedicated in honor of the sons of Waldo County who died in World War I . The 1921 Memorial Bridge was the largest memorial to World War I veterans in its time. The plaque reads: "THIS BRIDGE IS DEDICATED IN HONOR AND MEMORY OF THE SONS OF WALDO COUNTY WHO DIED IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR" 1914 - 1918 Then lists the fifty five men there after.

203 E Adams St, Hamburg, AR 71646
71646 Hamburg
AR
USA
The memorial is located inside Hamburg City Park.
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Robert Shay, PH3, USNR-R, 1964-70
Cleveland St
99402 Asotin
WA
USA

A Fourth of July editorial in the Asotin County Sentinal led to the adoption of a proposal by Doctor S.D. Brazeau to scrap the plan for a new steel bridge and in its place erect an eye catching concrete arch to memorialize the local men who lost their lives in the recently ended Great War. The more elaborate span would cost $6,000 more than the sum allocated for the original project and this amount was raised through a private donation campaign. The first pledge was made by J.C. Halsey, whose son, Archie M. Halsey, was the last of seven Asotin County residents killed in Action.The finished bridge is a wide elliptical concrete arch topped by an ornamental balustrade. Four pillars with hammer brushed insets adorned with brass plaques listing the names of the area’s veterans and topped by Victorian street lamps mark its approaches.Each of the four plaques on the bridge have this inscription followed by a list of those Asotin County residents who served in “The World War”. Those soldiers and sailors who “Made The Supreme Sacrifice” are noted with a star. A smaller version of the bridge was constructed for pedestrians entering the community park south of the Memorial Bridge.

SERVICE ROLL
ASOTIN COUNTY
MEMORIAL BRIDGE
DEDICATED IN HONOR AND
MEMORY OF THOSE WHO
SERVED IN THE WORLD WAR
1914 - 1918

Built by: Security Bridge Co., Lewiston Section
Designed by: R.F. Lorino of Lewiston, Idaho
Memorial Bridge Proposed: July 4, 1919
Asotin County Memorial Bridge Dedicated: November 11, 1922

13630 Georgia Ave.
20906 Aspen Hill
MD
USA

Buried here is Rags, the mascot of the 1st Division. He was considered to be a WWI war hero, and lived from 1916 to 1936.

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Rags_(dog)

 

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: The Wanderer
Mount Road and New Road
19014 Aston
PA
USA

The inscription on this memorial reads:

In Memory of
James L. Killen, Jr.
Jesse S. Mills
Rockdale Boys who died in Action
in the World War 1918

Erected by Their Neighbors of
Aston & Middletown Townships [Rear of Marker]
Roll of Honor
In Honor of those of this community who Patriotically responded to the call of their country in defense of the Liberties of mankind.
“These gallant men of our Armed Forces have fought for the ideals which they knew to be the ideals of their country”
Woodrow Wilson - 1918

Erected by: The Glen Riddle Branch of the Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania

  • July 21,1926
  • Dedication Date: July 21, 1926
  • American Legion
  • Single figure -- soldier
Route 30 (W. Marine Drive) and Columbia Ave
Astoria
OR
USA

Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery spent the winter of 1805-6 at Fort Clatsop which they constructed near the present city. 

This monument is located just east of the Astoria-Megler Bridge in Astoria. There are two memorial signs at this location.

Soldiers Monument -- Dedicated to Soldiers of World War of Clatsop County -- By the City of Astoria -- July 21, 1926
Doughboy Monument -- Erected in 1926 by the American Legion with funds donated by the citizens of west Astoria, also known as Uniontown -- Rededicated May 18, 1991

  • Width: 20'
  • 1926
  • Dedication Date: 1926
  • Long Island City Committee
  • Stele with bas-relief on pedestal on stepped base
  • Gaetano Cecere, Ruehl and wasrren
  • Other
Astoria Park
11105 Astoria
NY
USA

GREATER LOVE HATH NO MAN THAN THIS THAT / A MAN LAY DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIENDS /---/ ERECTED 1926 BY THE PEOPLE OF LONG ISLAND CITY / IN HONOR OF ALL THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS WHO SERVED IN THE WORLD WAR 1914-1918

  • Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch
1437 Peachtree Street
30309 Atlanta
GA
USA

This memorial in Pershing Point Park is dedicated to residents of Fulton County who died in World War I and is named for Gen. John Pershing. It is located at Peachtree and West Peachtree Streets in Midtown Atlanta. 

East Morningside Drive at Rock Springs Rd.
30324 Atlanta
GA
USA
  • Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch
1662 Rugby Avenue
30337 College Park
GA
USA
                  In Memoriam
           G.M.A. World War Heroes
             Whose Fidelity to Duty
             Honor and Country was
         Only Commensurate with the
          Supreme Sacrifice they Made
   

Dulce et Decorum Est Pro Patria Mori

                        translation:
“It is sweet and glorious to die for one’s country"
  • Dedication Date: November 11, 1927
  • Ernest Moore Viquesney
  • Single figure -- soldier
47918 Attica
IN
USA
  • Materials (select all that apply): Brick
  • 1919
  • 1919
  • Dedication Date: 01/01/1919
  • DAR
  • Auburn students killed in the war
  • On sidewalk near Samford hall
  • unknown
  • college, marker
  • Bench

This memorial, located on the campus of Auburn University near Samford Hall, consists of a small square stone topped with a bronze shield.  The metal plaque on the top of the stone reads:

"In memory of the Auburn men who gave their lives in the World War"

On the front side of the stone the following appears:

"Erected by D.A.R. Chapter 1919"

General Pershingstraat
9700 Oudenaarde
Vlaanderen
Belgium

The World War I Audenarde American Monument is located in the town of Oudenaarde (Audenarde), Belgium. The monument of golden-yellow limestone, bearing the shield of the United States flanked by two stone eagles, stands at the end of a small park. It commemorates the service and sacrifice of the 40,000 American troops who, in October and November 1918, fought in the vicinity as units attached to the Group of Armies commanded by the King of Belgium. The inscription on the Audenarde Monument reads:

Erected by the United States of America to commemorate the services of American troops who fought in this vicinity Oct. 30–Nov. 11, 1918

The 37th and 91st Divisions are the units honored. In mid-October 1918, they joined the Group of Armies of Flanders, commanded by Albert I, King of the Belgians. Both divisions participated in the offensive from near Waregem toward the Scheldt River, beginning October 31. The 37th Division reached the Scheldt River on November 1 and crossed on November 2. The 91st Division entered Audenarde on November 2 and 3. Both divisions were relieved by November 5. They resumed action in the front line on November 10, and were east of Audenarde when the Armistice became effective on November 11. American casualties from fighting in this region are interred at the Flanders Field American Cemetery in Waregem, located 10 miles to the west.

  • Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch
Central Avenue
30904 Augusta
GA
USA

The Grove runs several blocks in the median of Central Avenue from Troup Street to Monte Sano Avenue, and includes a marker commemorating Augusta residents who fell during World War I.

  • Picture by Mike Stroud, July 2008
30901 Augusta
GA
USA
American Gold Star Mother Tribute, Greene at 11th Streets, Augusta
30901 Augusta
GA
USA

“In Sacred memory of the Men of Richmond County Who Made the Supreme Sacrifice - World War 1”

“Erected By Woodlawn Camp No. 55 Woodman of the World”