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Monuments & Memorials

"The centennial of World War One offers an opportunity for people in the United States
to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors."

from The World War One Centennial Commission Act, January 14, 2013

DCWorldWarMonumen 1World War One was a watershed in American history. The United States' decision to join the battle in 1917 "to make the world safe for democracy" proved pivotal in securing allied victory — a victory that would usher in the American Century.

In the war's aftermath, individuals, towns, cities, counties, and states all felt compelled to mark the war, as did colleges, businesses, clubs, associations, veterans groups, and houses of worship. Thousands of memorials—from simple honor rolls, to Doughboy sculptures, to grandiose architectural ensembles—were erected throughout the US in the 1920s and 1930s, blanketing the American landscape.

Each of these memorials, regardless of size or expense, has a story. But sadly, as we enter the war's centennial period, these memorials and their very purpose—to honor in perpetuity the more than four million Americans who served in the war and the more than 116,000 who were killed—have largely been forgotten. And while many memorials are carefully tended, others have fallen into disrepair through neglect, vandalism, or theft. Some have been destroyed. Watch this CBS news video on the plight of these monuments.

The extant memorials are our most salient material links in the US to the war. They afford a vital window onto the conflict, its participants, and those determined to remember them. Rediscovering the memorials and the stories they tell will contribute to their physical and cultural rehabilitation—a fitting commemoration of the war and the sacrifices it entailed.

Memorial Hunters Club

We are building a US WW1 Memorial register through a program called the Memorials Hunters Club. If you locate a memorial that is not on the map we invite you to upload your treasure to be permanently archived in the national register.  You can include your choice of your real name, nickname or team name as the explorers who added that memorial to the register. We even have room for a selfie! Check the map, and if you don't see the your memorial CLICK THE LINK TO ADD IT.

 

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Southbridge World War I Memorialloupe
57 Elm St.
Southbridge
MA
USA
01550

Dedicated on January 1, 1938, the inscription on this memorial reads:

Names of Those
Who Made The
Supreme
Sacrifice

Frank Beers
Adelard Bibeau
Leo Bibeau
Stanislas Boisvert
Thomas H. Brogan
William Broughton
Henry C. Cunha
Samuel Desmaris
Parmelius Donais
Alphonse Dufault
Earl J. Durfee
Paul F. Fontaine
Robert Gardner
George Girard
Wilfred J. Girouard
William T. Kershaw
Arthur Lafleche
Theodore Proulx
Theophile J. Proulx
Henry W. Roberts
Pierre Talbot
Ralph L. Thresher
Albert S. Weeks

Emma Carey
War Nurse

Glory Shall Live Forever

They Gave Their Today For Our Tomorrow

Erected By the Citizens of Southbridge 1938


 
Southern Oklahoma Veterans Memorialloupe
1015 South Commerce Street
Ardmore
OK
USA
73401

Located at the historic Ardmore Veterans Center, where the original buildings of the home were constructed in 1910 to care for Civil War Veterans. There are many Memorial Monuments to the veterans and casualties of all wars of the United States.   

 
Southern Ute WWI Veterans Memorial loupe
Southern Ute Veterans Memorial Park
Ignacio
CO
USA
81137

This memorial site is located within the Southern Ute Veterans Memorial Park. There are two particular memorials dedicated to soldiers who served in WWI: the “Tribal Wall” and the “WWI Monument.”

The World War I Memorial Monument is a tablet measuring 3 feet wide by 1 feet deep by 5 feet tall. It honors the veterans who joined the military to help the government of the United States fight in World War I. One of these soldiers was Julius Cloud. He returned to become Chairman of the Southern Ute Tribe; his picture is on the monument.

The text on the monument reads:

“World War I
From warrior to soldier to always protect his people and his country.
His oath to the people of the United States of America.”

 
Spalding Co. - Griffin Spirit of the American Doughboy and Memorialloupe
Veterans Memorial Park, Intersection of 1st, Taylor Street and Memorial Drive
Griffin
GA
USA
30223
Main photo courtesy of Brian Haynes
 
Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
Marion Ave and North Davis St
Nashville
GA
USA
31639
1923
E. M. Viquesney

Berrien County commissioned the first Doughboy statue to honor the Berrien County soldiers who died in World War I. Sculpted by Ernest Moore Viquesney, a resident of Americus, Georgia, the statue was praised for its true portrayal of American soldiers during World War I. The statue stands seventeen feet tall, with a ten-foot-tall white Georgia marble base topped with a seven-foot-tall copper statue. The statue’s popularity grew, and Viquesney received orders from across the United States for replicas. There were over 140 statues created that can now be found in 39 states.

As Viquesney prepared to sculpt the first Doughboy statue he closely researched details of the soldiers’ uniforms and weapons to ensure that he created the best representation. He also asked two of his friends to model in their WWI uniforms, so he could study the folds of the uniform in his desired pose. As a result, the sculpture was praised for its demonstration of inspired confidence, showing an American soldier walking into No Man’s Land, holding a grenade in one hand above his head and a Springfield rifle in his other at his side. The soldier is also depicted carrying his mess kit, bedroll, and gas mask.

Berrien County lost more soldiers in proportion to its population in one event– the collision of the British transport ship the HMS Otranto with the HMS Kashmir–than any other county in the United States. The loss of life greatly affected the population of young men of rural Berrien County. The Spirit of the American Doughboy statue in Nashville, Georgia, represents those soldiers and others lost to disease or combat during WWI. The Nashville statue is known to community members as “Our Doughboy.”

The engraving on the front of the tall granite base reads:

ERECTED IN HONOR OF

THOSE WHO WENT FROM

BERRIEN COUNTY

TO SERVE OUR COUNTRY IN THE

WORLD WAR

1917-1919

LEST WE FORGET

 

An engraving on the Doughboy’s left side reads: 

HONOR ROLL

OTRANTO VICTIMS

(followed by a list of 25 county soldiers lost when the troop ship Otranto sank off the coast of Scotland following an October 1918 collision with the Kashmir during a storm.)

An engraving on the Doughboy’s right side reads:

HONOR ROLL

DIED FROM OTHER CAUSES

(followed by a list of 25 names)

 
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Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
Memorial Causeway Bridge
Clearwater
FL
USA
33767
November 11, 1927
E. M. Viquesney

This bronze sculpture by E.M. Viquesney depicts a life-sized World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire on No Man's Land, holding a rifle in his left hand and a grenade in his upraised right hand.  A new plaque on the pedestal of the Doughboy reads:

Spirit of the American Doughboy
Artist: E.M. Viquesney (1876 - 1946)
Copyrighted in 1920  
Originally dedicated on November 11, 1927
at the opening ceremony
of the Memorial Causeway Bridge.
Donated by the American Legion Post 7
in memory of 38 local service men
who died in World War I.  Rededicated November 10, 2006
following the completion of the
new Memorial Causeway Bridge in 2005,
the statue was restored and reinstalled.
Considered Viquesney's greatest work of art,
132 original "Doughboys" are still in existence.  

A plaque with similar wording is mounted on the pedestal of the Sailor.  Although the plaque denotes 132 Doughboys, more have been found since.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
DeBardeleben Park
Bessemer
AL
USA
35020
November 11, 1922
E.M. Viquesney
 
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Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
1005 S. Hancock
Colorado Springs
CO
USA
80903

This is an E.M. Viquesney "Spirit of the American Doughboy" depicting a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of No Man's Land, carrying a grenade in his raised right hand. The left hand formerly held a rifle.  It was dedicated in 1922 by The Cemetery Aid Association.

 
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Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
S Memorial Dr at W Calumet St
Appleton
WI
USA
54915

Spirit of the American Doughboy

100 Cities / 100 Memorials

100c 100m wwi centennial plaque E.M.Viquesney’s “Spirit of the American Doughboy”, honoring the soldiers from Outagamie County who served in World War I, was first erected on November 11,1934.  Over the years, the statue has experienced many years of deterioration and stress, including being nearly destroyed by an auto accident in 1986, and subsequent repair. The statue was most recently restored and rededicated on Veterans Day 2017, in commemoration of the centennial of the 1918 Armistice that ended World War I.  

The inscription on the plaque reads:

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF OUR COMRADES WHO ENTERED THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY FROM OUTAGAMIE COUNTY AND WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE WORLD WAR

PRESENTED BY
ONEY JOHNSON POST No. 36 AMERICAN LEGION NOVEMBER 11, 1934

Some additional history: The pedestal was acquired with public funds. The Doughboy was acquired by the local Legion, using funds raised by selling 50 cent chance for a drawing that used supplies provided by Viquesney, including a miniature Doughboy for use as the winning prize. The Doughboy’s cost of $700 in the Great Depression was $300 less than its original price in 1921.
The dedication ceremony included participation by 120th Field Artillery band, 127th Infantry, Eagles’ Drum/Bugle Corps, Appletion high band, Women’s Relief Corps, Girl/Boy/Cub scouts, Junior Red Cross, Spanish War Veterans and Auxiliary, Oney-Johnston American Legion and Auxiliary, Daughters of the American Revolution, Oney Johnston firing squad, Appleton Mayor John Goodland, Jr. and former State Legion Commander D. J. Kenny of West Bend.  The Doughboy was nearly destroyed in November 1986 when it was hit by an automobile whose driver had fallen asleep. It was broken from the pedestal, leaving the lower parts of the legs on the pedestal. Its upper arm was torn off. Appleton Lamplighter employees Bob Keiba, Steve Mondloch and Kevin Weisshahn, used mine detectors to sweep the area and locate all the loose pieces they could. Then they made replacements for pieces that couldn’t be found and fashioned a new rifle and bayonet. Chemically treated cement that wouldn’t expand/contract was placed in the legs to help provide stability. The pedestal was repaired by Appleton Marble and Granite. The Doughboy was replaced on his pedestal December 23, 1986. Included in the crew was Tony Knuppel, whose father, Anton, had set the Doughboy in the pedestal in 1934. The newly fashioned left hand and rifle were replaced on the Doughboy after the installation on the pedestal was completed. Unfortunately the Doughboy's legs were filled with cement to help stabilize it, but alternate seasonal freezing and thawing of the filler eventually caused the leg seams to split. The Doughboy was once again taken down and restored, this time by Jensen Conservation Services of Omaha, Nebraska. It was rededicated on November 11, 2006.

The old photos and essentially all items of information about the Appleton Doughboy were provided by Don Evans, Researcher at Appleton’s Outagamie County Historical Society.













 
Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
620 Cherry St # 208, Helena, AR 72342
Helena
AR
USA
72342
No additional information at this time.
 
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Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
489 Main Plaza,
New Braunfels
TX
USA
78130
Sculpture: Cast Zinc
Sculptor: E.M. Visquesney
Dedicated: Nov 11, 1937
Inscription: "Dedicated Nov 11, 1937 to World War I veterans of Comal County 1917-1918". This is one of a number of this sculpture, which appears in several other American states. The funds to purchase the statue were donated to American Legion Post 179 (whose charter members in 1920 were all World War I veterans) by Mr. and Mrs. E.M. Clousnitzer in 1937. The "doughboy" is standing in full combat gear, holding a rifle in his left hand. His right arm is upraised and extended forward, as if signaling, "Follow me!". He holds a grenade in his right hand.
 
Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
8 North Main Street
Philippi
WV
USA
26416

This E.M. Viquesney Spirit of the American Doughboy is located in front of the Historic Barbour County Courthouse. It is in excellent condition and has the original barbed wire still in place. It was dedicated November 11, 1923 to honor the men of Barbour County who died in World War I. It was erected by Barbour County Post No. 44 of the American Legion and the Citizens of Barbour County WV. Later plaques were added to honor the local citizens who died in the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

 
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Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
Winchester
KY
USA
40391
 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Axtellloupe
5th St and Maple St
Axtell
KS
USA
66403

This is an E.M. Viquesney Spirit of the American Doughboy statue, installed in May 1925, depicting a World War I infantryman advancing through the barbed wire and stumps of No Man's Land, while he carries a rifle and holds a hand grenade aloft. 

The plaque reads:

AXTELL BOYS
WHO SERVED IN
THE WORLD WAR
1914 – 1918                                                                                                                   
(Followed by 150 names in two columns. Two nurses are named first.  Four names have stars indicating they were killed).

The monument's acquisition was initiated by the R. R. Hendricks Post 214 of the American Legion. It was dedicated in the center of the intersection May 31, 1925 and relocated in 1960 to a small piece of land that had been leased from the railroad for that purpose in 1955. The total cost was about $1,850, of which $1,175 was for the sculpture and the rest for the base, the plaque and freight. Except for $150 paid from the town treasury, it was paid for by a public subscription project that took two years of raising funds by box-socials, raffles, and other events.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Belmarloupe
Seventh Avenue & Route 35
Belmar
NJ
USA
07715
1930
EM Viquesney

This sculpture is one of many casts made from EM Viquesney's doughboy design. Monuments using this design are scattered around NJ & the United States.

The sculpture, set upon a granite base, depicts a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of "No Man's Land."  He holds a rifle in his left hand & a grenade in his raised right hand.

The monument was erected in honor and memory of those from Belmar who served in World War I.

The doughboy sculpture was damaged by vandals in 2017. 

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS)  inventory #47260066. 

Photos courtesy of:
Statue - NJ State Historic Preservation Office
Dedication on Memorial Day 1930 - EM Viquesney Doughboy Database & Nick Mihalic 

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Birmingham loupe
Linn Park
Birmingham
AL
USA
35203
November 11, 1923
E.M. Viquesney

This sculpture currently sits atop a limestone pedestal at the South entrance of Linn Park, flanking the later Memorial to the Spanish American War. It was dedicated on November 11, 1923, where it sat at the front entrance to Municipal Auditorium, now known as Boutwell Auditorium. The statue was moved to the entrance of Linn Park, probably sometime in 1957, after a renovation to the front of the auditorium that year. The memorial was commissioned by the Greek-American Citizens of Birmingham in honor of the American Legion Birmingham Post No. 1. Its plaque is inscribed "In memory of the comrades who gave their lives in the service of our country during the World War. Presented to Birmingham Post No. 1 of the American Legion by the Greek-American Citizens. Birmingham, Alabama. Armistice Day 1923."  The plaque was stolen from the statue's base at some time in late 2010.  

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Doverloupe
Hurd Park, Rt. 46 & Princeton Avenue
Dover
NJ
USA
07801
1922
EM Viquesney

This sculpture is one of many casts made from EM Viquesney's doughboy design. Monuments using this design are scattered around NJ & the United States.

The sculpture, set upon a concrete base, depicts a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of "No Man's Land."  He holds a rifle in his left hand & a grenade in his raised right hand.

The monument was donated in 1922 by Dover Township resident, Peter C. Buck.  

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System Inventory (SIRIS) inventory #47260068. 

Photo courtesy of:  EM Viquesney Doughboy Database & Frank Poolas 

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Fair Havenloupe
Memorial Park, Fair Haven & River Road
Fair Haven
NJ
USA
07704
1924
EM Viquesney

This sculpture is one of many casts made from EM Viquesney's doughboy design. Monuments using this design are scattered around NJ & the US.

This copper cast sculpture, set upon a pink Maine granite base with beveled corners, depicts a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of "No Man's Land."  He holds a rifle in his left hand & a grenade in his raised right hand.

The monument was dedicated on August 16, 1924, in honor of Fair Haven residents who served in WWI. The base contains a bronze plaque with a Fair Haven World War I honor roll.  It cost approximately $1,000 with an undisclosed sum for the base. The Memorial Park Committee financed it by holding several events including a boxing tournament feature Gene Tunney.

In the late 1960s, vandals stole the rifle and broke the figure’s left hand.  In 1995, the sculpture was refurbished.

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #NJ000436. 

Photos Credit:  NJ State Historic Preservation Office

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Fort Smithloupe
4901 Midland Street
Fort Smith
AR
USA
72904

This is an E. M. Viquesney-sculpted pressed-copper figure of a WWI infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of No Man's Land, holding a rifle and grenade.  Originally located in Tillis Park, since approx. 1922, it was moved to the American Legion Post because of vandalism.  It is mounted on a fieldstone base and is dedicated to those who entered service from Fort Smith.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Frenchtownloupe
Edith Ort Thomas Elementary School, 902 Harrison Street
Frenchtown
NJ
USA
08825
1926
EM Viquesney

This sculpture is one of many casts made from EM Viquesney's doughboy design. Monuments using this design are scattered around NJ & the US.

This bronze cast sculpture, set upon a base, depicts a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of "No Man's Land."  He holds a rifle in his left hand & a grenade in his raised right hand.

The sculpture was erected in 1926 on the front lawn of Frenchtown High School (presently Edith Ort Thomas Elementary School) to honor Frenchtown & vicinity soldiers who served in World War I. The sculpture cost $2,700.

In the summer of 1995, the sculpture was refurbished and cleaned by the Easton Memorial Finishing Works of Easton, PA. The rifle end was refashioned and attached, and the sculpture was sandblasted and buffed. A new plaque honoring veterans of subsequent wars was added and the sculpture was rededicated on November 11, 1995.

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Infomration System (SIRIS) inventory #NJ000454. 

Photo courtesy of: Alan Edelson & Historical Marker Database

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Furman Universityloupe
Childers Plaza
Greenville
SC
USA
29617

In 1921, three years after the Armistice was signed, Furman University and Greenville paid tribute to the university's World War I veterans in a moving ceremony that unveiled a memorial statue of a doughboy. The copper soldier was one of numerous doughboy statues designed by E.M Viquesney - depicting a soldier rushing into battle, wielding a grenade in one hand and a rifle in the other - dedicated to honor veterans of World War I.  When the Furman Doughboy was first dedicated, hundreds of area residents turned out at the old campus in downtown Greenville. A bugler played taps as Mrs. T.J. Lyons, the mother of a Furman student who died in France during the war, gently loosened the fastening of the American flag that shrouded the statue.

An article in the July 1921 issue of the Furman Bulletin reported that the "handsome statue with splashes of molten gold and the youthful figure of an American Doughboy in France, preserved in lasting metal and stone, stood revealed to the eyes of the expectant throng." When the statue was uncovered, "applause broke forth. Tears filled the eyes of beholders. The base's rear reads: "More than 500 Furman men served in the World War." and ex-service men wept as they saw the figure, so life-like, emerge."

Five hundred and forty Furman men, almost the entire student body of the then all-male college, volunteered for service during the Great War. Six of them died during the war: Pvt. Thomas J. Lyons Jr.; Pvt. Otis Brodie; Lt. John H. David (the first South Carolina officer killed in action); Lt. Charles S. Gardner (who, though seriously wounded, refused to be removed from the battle); Sgt. Charles E. Timmons Jr. (who "went to death beyond the call of duty, while aiding men from another company"); and Cpl. Talmadge W. Gerrald (who gave his life trying to save a wounded comrade). Their names are inscribed at the base of the Doughboy.

Since that dedication day, the Furman Doughboy has become one of the university's most enduring landmarks. When Furman moved to its current location, so did the Doughboy. It was erected near the south end of the lake in 1957 and is one of the few surviving remnants of the old campus.

Over the last forty years, the Doughboy has lost its luster. The weather has taken its toll, and on two occasions it has been vandalized. The statue was moved for refurbishing to the Upcountry History Museum and the Furman University Library, and in 2004 a completely new replacement was cast in bronze by sculptor Maria J. Kirby Smith and placed back on campus at Childers Plaza.

The plaques that were with the Doughboy at its former location were also moved to Childers Plaza.

Two new plaques read: (on the low left brick column)

DOUGHBOY
ARTIST: E. M. VIQUESNEY
STATUE ORIGINALLY INSTALLED IN 1921 AT
THE DOWNTOWN GRENVILLE MEN’S CAMPUS
AND RECONSTRUCTED IN 2004 BY ARTIST
MARIA KIRBY-SMITH.
THE DOUGHBOY FACES EAST TOWARD
THE BATTLEFIELDS OF FRANCE.   
and on the low right brick column:

CHILDERS PLAZA
PROVIDED BY
ELAINE DUFFY CHILDERS ’43
WACO F. CHILDERS, JR. ’47
AND
FRIENDS OF
FURMAN UNIVERSITY

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Jamestownloupe
48 N. Main St. - Monument Square
Jamestown
KY
USA
42629

This E.M. Viquesney Doughboy, a life-sized figure of a WWI soldier advancing through No Man's Land, was dedicated on November 11, 1937.  The engraving across the left, front, and right ledge of the concrete base reads:

IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO DIED FOR GOD AND COUNTRY 

A plaque inscription on the rear of the base reads:

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY
OF THE PATRIOTIC CITIZENS
OF RUSSELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY
WHO ENTERED THE SERVICE
OF THE COUNTRY
DURING THE WORLD WAR
PRESENTED BY
RUSSELL POST NO. 133
AMERICAN LEGION
NOVEMBER 11, 1937

At some time a new plaque was added to the front of the base which reads:

FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF SERVICE
MEN FROM RUSSELL COUNTY WHO LOST THEIR
LIVES WHILE SERVING THEIR COUNTRY DURING
ONE OF THE WARS AS LISTED.

(Followed by 3 columns of names from WWI, WWII, and the Korean and Vietnam Wars)

On the night of February 19, 2008, the monument was struck and severely damaged by a pickup truck driven by an alleged drunk driver. The statue was knocked off its pedestal, and the right arm and left hand and rifle were broken off. The pieces of the statue were recovered and were housed inside the fire department for safekeeping. As the original zinc statue was considered too heavily damaged, replacement with a bronze duplicate was completed by Innocast Execuline, the same firm that replaced the New Ulm, Minnesota Doughboy in 1995. The insurance company that covered the vehicle involved in the accident contributed $25,000 to the cost of replacing the Doughboy. The new Doughboy was erected on September 19, 2008, and a rededication ceremony was held on November 11, the 71st anniversary of the original dedication. Sergeant Alvin York, the most decorated U.S. soldier in WWI, was present for the original dedication in 1937. His sons, Andrew and George York, were present at the 2008 rededication, with George York presenting some remarks. Sadly, in a virtual repeat of 2008, the statue was again hit by a vehicle on December 23, 2018, and once more knocked off its pedestal. 

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Libertyloupe
625 Campbellsville St.
Liberty
KY
USA
42539

This statue was sculpted by E.M. Viquesney and dedicated on November 11, 1935.  It depicts a WWI infantryman advancing through the barbed wire and stumps of No Man's Land.  It was shattered on July 4, 1982 in a truck accident and recast the following year, and again dedicated on November 11, 1983. A 1935 plaque honors the memory of the citizens of Casey County who died in service in WWI.

The inscription on the plaque on the front of the concrete base reads:

DEDICATED TO
THE MEMORY OF OUR COMRADES
WHO ENTERED THE SERVICE
OF THEIR COUNTRY
FROM CASEY COUNTY, KENTUCKY
AND WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES
IN THE WORLD WAR.
ERECTED BY THE CITIZENS OF
CASEY CO. AND ELSEWHERE
UNDER AUSPICES OF
CASEY POST NO. 78, AMERICAN LEGION
NOVEMBER 11, 1935

An inscription on a plaque on the back of the base reads:

THOSE WHO MADE
THE SUPREME SACRIFICE
DURING THE WORLD WAR
1917-1918
CASEY COUNTY, KENTUCKY
(followed by list of 32 names in two columns)

The plaque on the near side honors, by name, those who made the supreme sacrifice in Vietnam (7) and Korea (6), and a plaque on the far side honors those who made the supreme sacrifice in World War II (75).

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Matawanloupe
Memorial Park, Main & Broad Streets
Matawan
NJ
USA
07747
1927
EM Viquesney

This sculpture is one of many casts made from EM Viquesney's doughboy design. Monuments using this design are scattered around NJ & the US.

This bronze cast sculpture, set upon a granite base, depicts a World War I infantryman advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of "No Man's Land."  He holds a rifle in his left hand & a grenade in his raised right hand.

The monument was dedicated on Memorial Day 1927. The base contains a bronze plaque with a Matawan World War I honor roll.

Narrative adapted from Smithsonian Institution Research Information System (SIRIS) inventory #47260070. 

Photo courtesy of:  NJ State Historic Preservation Office

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - McCoy Parkloupe
McCoy Park
Fort Atkinson
WI
USA
53538

The inscription on the plaque on the ground reads:  

1898                    1917-1918
McCOY
PARK
Sponsored by
American Legion and
Spanish War Veterans
DEDICATED
to the
DEAD SOLDIERS

Dedicated along with the park on May 19, 1929. The left hand, bayonet and rifle were lost many years ago and the right arm was torn off in 1979. It was restored later that year in a little more forward position than it is on other Doughboys. After being lost again, the rifle was replaced by the pistol visible in the photograph to discourage people from swinging from it. The fence was also placed to discourage vandalism. The park was founded in a joint effort of the American Legion and Spanish-American War Veterans, but they could not agree on whether the statue should be of a soldier of the World War or the Spanish-American War. As a result, school children raised a small part of the cost, and a local physician paid $2,000 for the remainder of the monument’s costs from his own funds. An unsuccessful attempt was made in 1999 to have the Doughboy included in the National Register of Historic Places. 

 

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