fbpx
doughboys with mules The pilots African American Soldiers 1 gas masks pilots in dress uniforms African American Officers Mule Rearing Riveters

Maps

 

Display the map      
Moina Michael Highwayloupe
U.S. 78
GA
USA
Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

The Georgia General Assembly designated U.S. Highway 78 from Monroe to Athens, through Walton, Oconee and Clarke counties as the “Moina Michael Highway” in honor of the originator of wearing the memorial poppy for Veterans Day.  Michael was born near Monroe and was a faculty member at the University of Georgia.

The Georgia Department of Transportation has planted beds of memorial poppies along the median of the highway to bloom in the springs of 2017 and 2018 as part of the observance of Georgia’s role in World War I.

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Roosevelt Little White House loupe
401 Little White House Road
Warm Springs
GA
USA
31830
The Georgia home of Franklin D. Roosevelt, U.S. President during World War II.  Roosevelt first came to Warm Springs in 1924, hoping to find in the area’s warm springs a cure for the polio (infantile paralysis) that had struck him in 1921.  He built the Little White House in 1932 while governor of New York, came here often on retreat during his presidency, and died in the home on April 12, 1945.  Roosevelt served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, and was a forceful advocate for U.S. entry into World War I, putting him at odds with many of his administration colleagues.
 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Fort McPhersonloupe
1518 Stovall Lane SW
Atlanta
GA
USA
30310
Founded in 1885 and closed in 2011 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act of 2005, Fort McPherson was used as an internment camp for German POWs during World War I.  It also housed a base hospital, General Hospital No. 6; and was the site of an officers' training camp.  Immediately to the west of the post, across Campbellton Road, a war prison barracks was established to confine German POWs. The prison camp reached a peak population of 1,411 in July 1918.  The secretary of war directed that the permanent barracks of Fort McPherson be made available for general or base hospital use June 23, 1917. The command of the post was turned over to the ranking medical officer and Fort McPherson transformed itself into a general hospital with a capacity of nearly 2,400 beds. It is estimated that more than 10,000 patients were admitted from August 1917 until December 1918.

 

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Fort Oglethorpeloupe
Fort Oglethorpe
GA
USA
30742
Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

Opened in 1904, Fort Oglethorpe was an Army post for cavalry training in World War I, and also housed some 4,000 German prisoners of war and civilian detainees.  During World War I and World War II, it became a war-time induction and processing center. During World War II, it was a major training center for the Women’s Army Corps.  After its closure in 1946, the fort became the nucleus of the current town of Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia.

 

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Fort Screvenloupe
Meddin Drive at Tybee Light
Tybee Island
GA
USA
31328
Photos courtesy of Lamar Veatch

     In 1786, the Georgia Legislature approved the creation of a fort on Cockspur or Tybee Island, to be named in honor of Revolutionary War hero General James Screven. The fort was never built by the state, but in 1808 the property fell under the jurisdiction of the Federal government as the Fort Screven Reservation.

     In 1855, the government approved building Fort Screven on the north end of Tybee to provide modern coastal defense. Six poured-concrete, low-profile gun batteries (named for war heroes) and a minefield were ordered for Tybee along with hundreds of other military buildings. From 1897 to 1947 the fort was an integral part of America’s Coastal Defense system. Troops stood guard on Tybee through the Spanish American War of 1898, World War I and World War II. The Fort was closed in 1947 and sold to the City of Tybee and tourism returned as a major part of Tybee’s history. By the 1950s many of the fort’s buildings had been converted for use by private owners.

     In 1961, Battery Garland, the former gun battery and magazine for a 12-inch long-range gun, became the Tybee Island museum. A room that once stored six hundred pound projectiles and two hundred pound bags of gun powder, now holds the collections and exhibits of more than 400 years of Tybee Island history.  It is the location of the only shot fired in anger in Georgia during World War I.

     Today, the abandoned and silent concrete bunkers stand side-by-side with fine beachside homes. Visitors marvel at the private residences nestled atop the fort’s walls, the magnificent ocean and river views and the fort that played a role in so many phases of American history.

 

 
Display the map      
Augusta Arsenalloupe
Augusta
GA
USA
30904

Relocated in 1827-28 from an earlier site along the Savannah River, the Augusta Arsenal served as a military armament supply and training center for the U.S. military, and briefly for the Confederate armies, until its closure in the mid-1950s.  During World War I, the Arsenal became a center for the repair of small arms and rifles.  After 1918, only a small force was stationed at the Arsenal.  After closure, it first was transferred to the Richmond County Board of Education, but later became the site of Augusta State College, which today is part of Augusta University.  The old Arsenal buildings remain in place as administration buildings for the campus.  A museum is in the former guardhouse of the Arsenal, at Walton Way and Katherine Street, Augusta.  An official state historical marker is at the site. 

 
Display the map      
Camp Hancockloupe
Augusta
GA
USA
30909

Camp Hancock existed only from 1917-1919.  It was one of sixteen U.S. Army National Guard Mobilization and Training Camps established in 1917 to train and integrate National Guard units for service in a U.S. Army division. The site contained some 1,777 acres on a reservation of 13,811. The camp was to have a capacity of about 50,000 officers and enlisted men that would become the 28th U.S. Infantry Division.  Formed originally in August 1917 from Pennsylvania National Guard units, the Division began departing for France in April 1918. The 28th distinguished itself in combat, fighting sometimes hand to hand. The 28th suffered heavy casualties, including 2,531 killed, 13,746 wounded and 726 captured. At the end of the war the camp became a demobilization center until it was abandoned in March 1919.  No signs of the camp remain at the site along Wrightsboro Road across from the Forest Hills Golf Course. 


 
Display the map      
Camp Gordonloupe
Chamblee
GA
USA
30341

Established July 1917, Camp Gordon was constructed as one of sixteen National Army Training Camps prepared for U.S. entry into World War I.  The camp was built on 2,400 acres and came to have 1,600 buildings with a capacity of 47,000 troops and an eventual cost of $ 11,900,000.  Camp Gordon served as the training camp for the 82nd Infantry Division, organized in August 1917, which began deployment to Europe in April 1918.  While in Europe the 82nd had 8,300 casualties.  Camp Gordon was ordered abandoned in 1920 and disposed of in September 1921, and is now the site of Peachtree-DeKalb Airport.  A state marker is on a small plaza at the airport. 

 

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Camp Wheeler - Bibb Co. - Maconloupe
Macon
GA
USA
31217

One of sixteen U.S. Army National Guard Mobilization and Training Camps established in 1917 to train and integrate National Guard units for service in a U.S. Army division, Camp Wheeler occupied a site of some 21,480 acres along what today is Riggins Mill Road at Joe Tamplin Industrial Boulevard in Macon. The camp was to have a capacity of about 43,000 officers and enlisted men that would become the 31st U.S. Infantry Division.  Formed in October 1917, the 31st departed for France in October 1918, returned to the U.S. and was demobilized in December 1918. When the 31st arrived in France its members were dispersed as replacements for other units, and thus did not see combat as a unit. At the end of the war, Camp Wheeler became a demobilization center until it was abandoned in April 1919. Reactivated in 1940 on the original site, it was used through World War II as a training camp and prisoner of war camp until 1945. A 1,000 bed hospital was constructed for returning wounded soldiers. The camp was abandoned as surplus property in January 1946 and the leased land returned to its owners. Today only a historical marker denotes the site.

 

 
Display the map      
Camp Greenleafloupe
Fort Oglethorpe
GA
USA
30742

Camp Greenleaf was a medical officer training camp created at Chickamauga National Battlefield Park as part of Fort Oglethorpe during World War I, under a program that utilized national park and battlefield land for military training installations.  Camp Greenleaf was authorized in May 1917 and began training the next month to prepare medical officers for work with motor field units, mule-drawn units, evacuation hospitals and base hospitals, additionally including veterinary and dental training.  In only 18 months of operation, being decommissioned in December 1918, Camp Greenleaf trained 6,640 officers and 31,138 enlisted men. 

 

 
Display the map      
Camp Forrestloupe
Fort Oglethorpe
GA
USA
30742

Camp Forrest of World War I should not be confused with the much larger Camp Forrest of World War II, which was located northwest of Chattanooga near Tullahoma, Tennessee.  During World War I, Camp Forrest was co-located with Camp Greenleaf and Camp McLean at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia.  Its wooden barracks were erected among the monuments honoring Union and Confederate dead in the Battle of Chickamauga.  Its primary purpose was to train infantry engineers.  It was as short-lived as its colleague camps, and was decommissioned in December 1918.

 

 
Display the map      
Camp Jesuploupe
Atlanta
GA
USA
30310

Camp Jesup was built next to Fort McPherson during World War I, constructed by local civilians and German prisoners of war to serve as a major center for repairing, overhauling, and reconstructing vehicles, and as a storage area for transport supplies. Jesup's facilities included living quarters, mess halls, and administrative buildings. During the peak of war activity, nearly 4,000 civilian and 2,100 military personnel were employed at the camp. Jesup remained active after the war as a motor transport school, a general depot, and a quartermaster intermediate storage depot. Camp Jesup was deactivated on August 23, 1927.

 

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Sumter Co.-- Souther Fieldloupe
(current site of Jimmy Carter Regional Airport, Americus, and South Georgia Technical College)
Americus
GA
USA
31709

Building on the rapid development of aviation during World War I, the U.S. Army in 1918 constructed Souther Field as a primary flight-training facility.  It was built just northeast of Americus in a former peach orchard purchased by Sumter County and deeded to the federal government.  At the height of its World War I activities, Souther had 147 planes and about 1,500 service personnel.  Deactivated following World War I in April 1923, its planes were sold off to the highest bidders.  Charles Lindbergh bought his first airplane as part of that auction, stayed for flight training, and completed his first solo flight at Souther within three weeks of his purchase.  A seven-foot statue of Lindbergh is displayed at the site.  Souther was reactivated during World War II to train aviation cadets of the U.S. Army Air Force and the British Royal Air Force.  Today, Souther Field has become the Jimmy Carter Regional Airport, and some of the original buildings still stand as part of South Georgia Technical College.  A state historical marker at the site recounts Lindbergh’s first solo flight.

 
Pictures gallery    Display the map      
Camp Benningloupe
Cusseta
GA
USA
31905
Photo Courtesy, Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia Collection, mus006

Fort Benning, today home to the U.S. Army Infantry, began in 1917 as Camp Benning.  Now the world’s premier school of arms, it has trained many of the infantry who fought in America’s wars, including noted generals such as Omar Bradley, George Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, George Patton and Colin Powell.  At the outbreak of World War I, as the nation faced inadequate infantry training facilities, a board chose Columbus, Georgia, for a new, larger infantry school based on its climate, terrain and transportation.  The first camp was established in fall 1918, and named (at the request of the Columbus Rotary Club) for Confederate brigadier general Henry L. Benning, who lived in Columbus until his death in 1875.  Troops began arriving in October 1918, and the camp was made permanent and the name changed to Fort Benning in 1922.

 

 
Display the map      
MacArthur Memorialloupe
198 Bank Street.
Norfolk
VA
USA
23510
The MacArthur Memorial is a museum and research center dedicated to preserving and presenting the story of General Douglas MacArthur and the millions of men  and women who served with him in World War I, World War II, the Occupation of Japan, and the Korean War. Admission is FREE and the museum is open to the public Tuesday-Sunday ((757) 441-2965).
 
Hampton Roads Naval Museumloupe
One Waterside Drive, Suite 248
Norfolk
VA
USA
23510
The Hampton Roads Naval Museum (HRNM) is an official Department of the Navy museum that teaches the history of the U.S. Navy in Hampton Roads from the 1770s through the present day. HRNM is part of the Naval History and Heritage Command in Washington, D.C., and admission to visit the museum is always free of charge.
 
U.S. Army Quartermaster Museumloupe
2220 Adams Avenue, Building, 5218
Fort Lee
VA
USA
23801
The Quartermaster Museum's mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit the history and heritage of the Quartermaster Corps, the oldest logistical branch in the Army. The museum is free and open to the public Monday - Saturday, 10:00am - 5:00pm. Point of Contact, Laura Baghetti, (804) 734-4203.
 
Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Foundationloupe
20 N. Coalter Street
Staunton
VA
USA
24401

Through exhibits on the President’s life and times -including The Great War (World War I), The Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library educates our visitors on how President Wilson changed the world and how his ideals continue to do so. 

Contact: Heather Sutton, Education Coordinator, [email protected]; 540-885-0897 x 114.

 
Display the map      
Camp Warden McLeanloupe
Chickamauga
GA
USA
30707

Camp Warden McLean was yet a third camp at the Fort Oglethorpe site, being dedicated to reserve officers training.  With a barracks capacity of 1,500, its facilities ceased to be used for that purpose at it was turned over to Camp Greenleaf in November 1917 to house motor field units.

 

 
Cruiser Olympia at Independence Seaport Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvanialoupe
Seaport Museum, 211 South Christopher Columbus Boulevard
Philadelphia
PA
USA
19106

The Olympia carried the U.S. Unknown Soldier from WW1 back from France.  Olympia was Admiral Dewey's flagship at the Battle of Manila Bay in May, 1898.   Moored along the Delaware River at Penn's Landing at the foot of Spruce Street alongside the WW2 submarine Becuna, launched 1944.

There is an admission charge to go on board and tour the ship.  However, you can see  the ship without charge from the Penn's Landing walkway along the river, reached via the public streets and sidewalks.   You can reach the Olympia at Penn's Landing via Columbus Blvd. or the Spruce St. or Dock St. walkways.

Independence Seaport Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.  The Museum will be CLOSED every Monday from January 9 - March 2017 with the exception of holidays.

Between Memorial Day and Labor Day the Historic Ships will be open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays

The Museum is closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day.

See the museum's web site for further details.

 

"Pershing" Donors

$5 Million +


Founding Sponsor
PritzkerMML Logo


Starr Foundation Logo


The Lilly Endowment