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Naval Monument at Brestloupe
Cours Dajot
Brest
Bretagne
France
29200

The World War I Naval Monument at Brest, France stands on the ramparts of the city overlooking the harbor which was a major base of operations for American naval vessels during the war. The original monument built on this site to commemorate the achievements of the U.S. Navy during World War I was destroyed by the Germans on July 4, 1941, prior to the United States' entry into World War II. The present structure is a replica of the original and was completed in 1958.

Brest is the westernmost port of France. Its location and activities there have been vital in commerce and conflicts over the centuries. Brest was especially important to many missions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) during 1917 and 1918.

The monument is a rectangular rose colored granite shaft rising 145 feet above the lower terrace and 100 feet above the Cours Dajot. It sits upon a German bunker complex at the approximate site of the original monument. All four sides of the monument are decorated with sculpture of naval interest. The surrounding area has been developed by the American Battle Monuments Commission into an attractive park. The Naval Monument at Brest displays this inscription in both English and French:

Erected by the United States of America to commemorate the achievements of the naval forces of the United States and France during the world war.

 
Souilly Marker - First Army Headquartersloupe
Souilly Town Hall
Souilly
Grand Est
France
55220

On the outside of the town hall of Souilly, France is a bronze tablet identifying this building as the headquarters of the American First Army towards the end of World War I. Inscribed in French and English is the following:

Headquarters of the American First Army
occupied this building from September 21, 1918
to the end of hostilities, and from here
conducted the Meuse-Argonne Offensive,
one of the greatest operations of the war.

 
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Tours American Monumentloupe
117 Avenue Andre Malraux
Tours
France
37000

The World War I Tours American Monument commemorates the efforts of the 650,000 men who served during World War I in the Services of Supply (SOS) of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) and whose work behind the battle lines made possible the achievements of the American Armies in the field. The city of Tours was its headquarters during the war. It is located just east of the southern end of Pont Wilson which crosses the Loire River in prolongation of the main street (Rue National) of Tours, and consists of a handsome fountain of white stone with a gold gilded statue of an American Indian holding an eagle. The surrounding area was developed into a small park by the American Battle Monuments Commission.

The fountain’s column between the lower and upper basins displays sculptures of the coats of arms of Bordeaux, Brest, Is-sur-Tille, Le Mans, Neufchâteau, Nevers, St. Nazaire, and Tours. Important installations of the SOS were located in those cities during the war. Four sculptured figures appear on the column above the upper basin. They represent the four principal divisions of the SOS: Administration, Construction, Procurement, and Distribution. A bronze sculpture gleams from the top of the monument. Successful execution of those functions enabled the combatant forces to concentrate on defeating the enemy.

By the time of the Armistice on November 11, 1918, a total of 2,057,907 American troops had come to European soil. Among them were almost 645,000 soldiers and 24,000 civilians of the SOS.  Here are examples of SOS accomplishments:

  • Constructed almost 1,000 miles of standard-gauge railway tracks;
  • Assembled more than 1,500 locomotives and 18,000 rail cars with parts shipped from the United States;
  • Managed hospitals with a capacity of 192,844 beds.

General John J. Pershing, commander of the AEF, said this about the Services of Supply in his final report:  Magnificent efforts were exerted by the entire Services of Supply to meet the enormous demands made on it. Obstacles which seemed insurmountable were overcome daily in expediting the movements of replacements, ammunition and supplies to the front, and of sick and wounded to the rear.

 
Waterville World War I Markerloupe
Elm St and Park St
Waterville
ME
USA
04901

The inscription on this marker, located in Veterans Memorial Park, reads:

1917-1919
In honor and appreciation of those who served their state and county to the credit of the City of Waterville in the World War.
(followed by 14 rows of inscribed names)

An adjoining plaque reads:
American Legion Seal Dedicated and refinished by Bourque-Lanigan Post No. 5 American Legion and Waterville Parks and Recreation Department May 20th 1995                        Dedicated on Veteran's Day Nov 11,1995

 
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Irvington World War I Memorialloupe
26 King Carter Drive
Irvington
VA
USA
22480

The inscription on this memorial reads:

To our departed comrades who served their country during the Great World War
Fred D. Mason
Died in Germany
Aug. 20, 1921

Robert H. Barker
Died in Service
Nov. 14, 1918

A separate bronze plaque reads:
Rebuilt in May 1988 as an Eagle Scout Project of Ashley Lewis Robertson of Kilmarnock Troop 242

 
Summit Hill World War I Memorialloupe
114 West Ludlow
Summit Hill
PA
USA
18250

The inscription on this memorial, erected in 1922 by Summit Hill Schools, reads: 
TO THE VETERANS OF
THE WORLD WAR.
UPON RIGHT, RELIANT
AGAINST WRONG, DEFIANT.

 
Wilson Borough World War I Memorialloupe
1803 S. 18th St
Easton
PA
USA
18042

The inscription on this memorial reads: 

"To those who patriotically responded to the call of their country for service in the World War, this memorial erected A.D. 1925 by the Citizens of Wilson Borough, is gratefully dedicated. 1917-1918"

 
American Legion World War I Memorialloupe
726 N. Front St.
Wormsleyburg
PA
USA
17043

The inscription on this memorial, dedicated in 1979, reads:

In memory of
the Veterans
of World War I
who founded the
American Legion

At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker, including a World War II Memorial and Women of the Armed Forces. 

 
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Munhall World War I Memorialloupe
555 E. 9th St.
Homestead
PA
USA
15120

The inscription on this memorial reads: 

ERECTED BY
THE CITIZENS OF THE
BOROUGH OF MUNHALL
TO THE MEMORY
OF HER PATRIOTS IN
THE GREAT WORLD WAR
1917 - 1919

IN SPECIAL COMMEMORATION
TO THOSE WHO MADE
THE SUPREME SACRIFICE
THIS TABLET IS DEDICATED.

ELLSWORTH K. DAVIES
★ EDGAR GALLAGHER
★ DAVID JONES
★ MARTIN LACEY
★ ROBERT LEAN
★ GEORGE MCSHANE

"THEY DID NOT DIE TOO SOON WHO HELD THE FRONT FOR CHRISTENDOM. WHAT EQUAL GLORIES COULD THEIR FURTHER YEARS HAVE WON?"

 
Lancaster Spirit of the American Doughboyloupe
431 S. Ann St.
Lancaster
PA
USA
17602

This E.M. Viquesney Spirit of the American Doughboy is dedicated to the men and women of the Seventh Ward of Lancaster who served in World War I.

The inscription reads:

Dedicated to
The men and women
of the Seventh Ward
Lancaster, PA.
who by their patriotism
courage and devotion
helped win
The World War
1914 - 1918
for humanity, liberty and righteousness
erected by the
Citizens of the Seventh Ward

The Doughboy was originally dedicated November 11, 1925 at East End Junior High, now known as Edward Hand Middle School, in a ceremony in which the Lancaster Gold Star Mothers, American Legion, Knights of Malta, and students of the Junior High, played prominent roles. It was unveiled by three Gold Star Mothers, and tribute was paid to the 482 men and women of the Seventh Ward who served during the war. It was purchased with funds raised by public subscriptions of residents of the Seventh Ward, and had been in Lancaster nearly a year while an appropriate site was selected. The Doughboy was moved to the Stahr Armory location in 1962. The doughboy's arms and rifle barrel have been cut off and replaced. By 1986 it had lost its right hand and grenade. They were restored. In 1992, vandals pushed the whole sculpture of its base and onto the grass. Currently, the statue appears to be in very good condition.

On June 12, 2013, The statue was moved back to its original Seventh Ward neighborhood location on South Ann Street after 51 years. The Armory was put up for sale and the City of Lancaster did not want the statue to be sold with the building and possibly lose this historic treasure. Because the statue had been in front of the Armory for 51 years, legally the City no longer owned the statue. The City's Public Art Manager contacted the Pennsylvania Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (the property owner) to negotiate the return of the statue to the City. A public meeting was held at Edward Hand Middle School to discuss moving the statue back to its original location in front of the school. All attendees were in favor of returning the statue to the school and the decision was subsequently approved by a School District of Lancaster School Board vote. The return to Hand Middle School was prompted by the South Ann Concerned Neighbors group. The new location was carefully selected because of its close proximity to the school, ample lighting, and two surveillance cameras mounted on the school that survey the area surrounding the statue. A rededication ceremony was held on October 15, 2013 at 1:30 pm. 

 
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Lompoc World War I Memorialloupe
200 S. H Street
Lompoc
CA
USA
93436

The Lompoc World War I Memorial, located at the Lompoc Museum, was erected in 1925 by Civic Club and dedicated to the WWI soldiers from Lompoc. To commemorate the 100-year anniversary of World War I, the Memorial was renovated, including adding commemorative plaques and benches, installing atop the capstone a life-sized bronze eagle by sculptor Mike Curtis, and adding to the base a bas relief bronze sculpture of a doughboy soldier created by local artist Ed Brooks.  It was rededicated on November 11, 2018.

 
Southborough  WWI Memorialloupe
01772 Common St.
Southborough
MA
USA
01772

The inscription on this memorial reads:

Captured World War I German Howitzer 155 mm
Donated in 1919 by
American Legion Post 132
Restored 1991
In memory of
All World War I Veterans
Southborough, Massachusetts

 
Monterey World War I Memorial Live Oak Treeloupe
Pacific and Madison Sts
Monterey
CA
USA
93940

The inscription on a plaque in front of this tree, erected in 1919 by the Red Cross, reads:

This tree was planted
by the
Red Cross
May 30, 1919
in memory of
Monterey’s sons
who made the
supreme sacrifice
in the World War


 
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In Memory of Colonel Luke Lealoupe
1298 Belle Meade Blvd
Nashville
TN
USA
37221

The inscription on this memorial reads:
So the posterity might enjoy the benefits of a public park preserved in its natural beauty, in 1927 Colonel Lea gave the original tract of 868 acres of this land to the city of Nashville requesting that the park near the name of his late father-in-law, the late Percy Warner.
Erected by officers who served under Colonel Lea in the 114th field artillery during the First World War.

After serving as a U.S. Senator from Tennessee from March 1911 to March 1917, Lea returned to Nashville and organized a volunteer military outfit which, on 6 Apr. 1917, became the First Tennessee Field Artillery. With the rank of lieutenant colonel, Luke Lea was its commander until 18 October when he became colonel of this regiment of the Thirtieth Division. An imposing military figure, colorful and daring, Lea led the all-volunteer regiment in many battles. During the lull just after the armistice and Kaiser Wilhelm's abdication, Lea and a group of younger officers made a bold trip to Holland to capture the Kaiser at his retreat. They got to the doorway of the retreat, but the coup attempt failed when the kaiser refused to turn himself over to Lea and his officers. The episode became an international incident, Holland protesting that its neutrality had been violated. Colonel Lea received the Distinguished Service Medal before his discharge on 12 April 1919.

 
Anderson County World War Veterans Memorialloupe
100 E. 4th Ave.
Garnett
KS
USA
66032

This memorial, erected in 1934, honors all World War veterans from Anderson County. The inscription reads:

In memory

of our
World War

Veterans
from
Anderson Co.

 
Pottawatomie County War Memorial - Onagaloupe
400 Leonard St
Onaga
KS
USA
66521

This memorial includes a doughboy statue and honor roll listing of all veterans from Pottawatomie County who served during the Great War. Honor rolls for later wars were added on other sides of the concrete base.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Axtellloupe
5th St and Maple St
Axtell
KS
USA
66403

This is an E.M. Viquesney Spirit of the American Doughboy statue, installed in May 1925, depicting a World War I infantryman advancing through the barbed wire and stumps of No Man's Land, while he carries a rifle and holds a hand grenade aloft. 

The plaque reads:

AXTELL BOYS
WHO SERVED IN
THE WORLD WAR
1914 – 1918                                                                                                                   
(Followed by 150 names in two columns. Two nurses are named first.  Four names have stars indicating they were killed).

The monument's acquisition was initiated by the R. R. Hendricks Post 214 of the American Legion. It was dedicated in the center of the intersection May 31, 1925 and relocated in 1960 to a small piece of land that had been leased from the railroad for that purpose in 1955. The total cost was about $1,850, of which $1,175 was for the sculpture and the rest for the base, the plaque and freight. Except for $150 paid from the town treasury, it was paid for by a public subscription project that took two years of raising funds by box-socials, raffles, and other events.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Furman Universityloupe
Childers Plaza
Greenville
SC
USA
29617

In 1921, three years after the Armistice was signed, Furman University and Greenville paid tribute to the university's World War I veterans in a moving ceremony that unveiled a memorial statue of a doughboy. The copper soldier was one of numerous doughboy statues designed by E.M Viquesney - depicting a soldier rushing into battle, wielding a grenade in one hand and a rifle in the other - dedicated to honor veterans of World War I.  When the Furman Doughboy was first dedicated, hundreds of area residents turned out at the old campus in downtown Greenville. A bugler played taps as Mrs. T.J. Lyons, the mother of a Furman student who died in France during the war, gently loosened the fastening of the American flag that shrouded the statue.

An article in the July 1921 issue of the Furman Bulletin reported that the "handsome statue with splashes of molten gold and the youthful figure of an American Doughboy in France, preserved in lasting metal and stone, stood revealed to the eyes of the expectant throng." When the statue was uncovered, "applause broke forth. Tears filled the eyes of beholders. The base's rear reads: "More than 500 Furman men served in the World War." and ex-service men wept as they saw the figure, so life-like, emerge."

Five hundred and forty Furman men, almost the entire student body of the then all-male college, volunteered for service during the Great War. Six of them died during the war: Pvt. Thomas J. Lyons Jr.; Pvt. Otis Brodie; Lt. John H. David (the first South Carolina officer killed in action); Lt. Charles S. Gardner (who, though seriously wounded, refused to be removed from the battle); Sgt. Charles E. Timmons Jr. (who "went to death beyond the call of duty, while aiding men from another company"); and Cpl. Talmadge W. Gerrald (who gave his life trying to save a wounded comrade). Their names are inscribed at the base of the Doughboy.

Since that dedication day, the Furman Doughboy has become one of the university's most enduring landmarks. When Furman moved to its current location, so did the Doughboy. It was erected near the south end of the lake in 1957 and is one of the few surviving remnants of the old campus.

Over the last forty years, the Doughboy has lost its luster. The weather has taken its toll, and on two occasions it has been vandalized. The statue was moved for refurbishing to the Upcountry History Museum and the Furman University Library, and in 2004 a completely new replacement was cast in bronze by sculptor Maria J. Kirby Smith and placed back on campus at Childers Plaza.

The plaques that were with the Doughboy at its former location were also moved to Childers Plaza.

Two new plaques read: (on the low left brick column)

DOUGHBOY
ARTIST: E. M. VIQUESNEY
STATUE ORIGINALLY INSTALLED IN 1921 AT
THE DOWNTOWN GRENVILLE MEN’S CAMPUS
AND RECONSTRUCTED IN 2004 BY ARTIST
MARIA KIRBY-SMITH.
THE DOUGHBOY FACES EAST TOWARD
THE BATTLEFIELDS OF FRANCE.   
and on the low right brick column:

CHILDERS PLAZA
PROVIDED BY
ELAINE DUFFY CHILDERS ’43
WACO F. CHILDERS, JR. ’47
AND
FRIENDS OF
FURMAN UNIVERSITY

 
St. Tammany Parish WWI Memorial Arches Plaqueloupe
1312 N. Columbia St.
Covington
LA
USA
70433

The inscription on this plaque reads:

Erected and Dedicated
To The Soldiers
Of World War I
1920
Restored
2010

By St. Tammany Parish
Kevin Davis, Parish President.

 
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WWI U.S. Army Doughboy - Kennerloupe
1803 Minor St.
Kenner
LA
USA
70062

The inscription on this marker, erected in 1995 by Treasure Chest Casino, reads:

Dedicated November 11, 1995

The United States had a regular Army of only 200,000 men when it declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917. 

With a need for a larger army, Congress passed a Selective Service Act that made all able-bodied men between the ages of 21 and 30 subject to military service. The government put nearly 4 million men in uniform and sent about 2 million soldiers overseas as members of the American Expeditionary Force. 

WWI infantrymen were called "Doughboys" because of the similarity of the buttons worn on their uniforms to a popular Civil War era doughnut called a "doughboy".

 

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