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Maps

 

Breckinridge County WWI Honor Rollloupe
208 South Main St.
Hardinsburg
KY
USA
40143

Erected in 1927 by the Breckinridge County Memorial Association, the inscription on this Honor Roll reads:

★ Honor Roll ★
In memory of the Breckinridge County
heroes of the World's War, 1914-1918

George W. Ahl • Johnie Brown • Corbett J. Burch • Walter V. Burnett • Claude E. Cundiff • Earl Curry • Roy Dowell • Henry H. Drane • Joseph Z. Dunn • Lonnie Durbin • James Durbin • William Eskridge • Henry Eskridge • Henry Byron Hall • H. Everette Haycraft • Charles Hanks • Lewis H. Herndon • Thomas Higdon • Henry W. Johnson • Verdie Johnson • Arthur W. Kannapel • James C. Lampton • Willie Lucas • Lennie A. Mattingly • Peter S. McCarty • Neil Moore • Roy E. Moorman • Delbert D. Morgan • Joseph E. Schindler • Clarence H. Tincher • James R. Willis • Fulton Whitworth

 
Needles World War I Memorial Cannonloupe
950 Front St.
Needles
CA
USA
92363

The inscription on this memorial, located in the park in front of an historic hotel, reads:

Erected by the Citizens of Needles in memory of those who gave their services to the Nation during The World War  1917 -1918

 
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Milo Lemert Memorial Buildingloupe
2 South Main St.
Crossville
TN
USA
38555

The inscription on this building's plaque reads:

Formerly the main Crossville United States post office, this courthouse annex bears the name of Cumberland County World War I hero Milo Lemert (1890 - 1918).

Milo Lemert was a sergeant in Company G 119th Infantry 30th Division of the Tennessee National Guard nicknamed the "Old Hickory Division". He is credited with destroying 3 German machine gun nests on the Hindenburg line and was killed while attempting to subdue the fourth on September 29, 1918.

Milo Lemert, a courageous Cumberland Countian, was honored with America's highest military recognition The Medal of Honor.

Additional background on Milo Lemert:

Born in Marshalltown, lowa, on March 25, 1890, Lemert entered service in his hometown of Crossville, TN. The American Legion Post in Savannah, TN, is named for him. Savannah's Milo Lemert Memorial Bridge was dedicated in 1930 and served the area until it was taken down in 1980. The new bridge, dedicated in 1981, was named the Harrison-McGarity Bridge in honor of two other Hardin County Medal recipients. The area Post Office is now the Milo Lemert Memorial Building. In 1991, the Tennessee Department of Transportation announced that the bypass around Crossville would be designated the Sergeant Milo Lemert Memorial Parkway.

On Sept. 29, 1918, near Bellicourt, France, the left flank of Lemert's company was under fire from a machine gun emplacement causing heavy casualties. Lemert found the location of the gun and, under heavy fire, he rushed it single-handed, one man against the machine gun. He killed the entire enemy crew with grenades and continued along the enemy trench ahead of his company. He charged again, silencing the second gun with grenades. When a third gun emplacement opened up on him from the left, he destroyed it as well. With another sergeant, he then attacked a fourth machine gun nest and was killed as he reached the emplacement. His courageous action and skill against the enemy guns prevented many casualties in his company.

Less than two months before he was killed, Lemert wrote to his mother, "I am a pretty good soldier and am proud of it....As for me I can shut my eyes and dream such sweet dreams of Tenn. that I am sure I will have to be chained in heaven if I do get bumped off in No Man’s Land."

After Milo's death, his brother and fellow soldier Nathan Lemert, wrote to their mother, "There is no use to grieve, tho Mama...He died like a man and hero. No one can die a braver death than he did...Every man in the company loved him and would do anything for him...His last words were, ‘I am finished, boys, give them hell.’...I helped bury him. We put him with the rest of our boys who were killed."

 
Lt. General John Archer Lejeune Monumentloupe
201 E. Main St.
New Roads
LA
USA
70760

General John Archer Lejeune was born in Point Coupee Parish, LA about 15 miles north of New Roads. This statue and the accompanying memorial is on the ground of the Parish Courthouse.

Marker located at the statue, states

John Archer Lejeune Lieutenant General, U.S. Marine Corps 1867 – 1942
During his more than forty years of service with the Marine Corps, John A. Lejeune participated in campaigns in Panama, Cuba, Mexico, France and Germany. He led the famed 2nd Division, American Expeditionary Force, during World War I with valor and distinction. His leadership of his Marines in the critical action at St. Mihiel earned him the French Legion of Honor.
As Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps, he foresaw a unique mission for the Corps in amphibious expeditionary operations. By doing so, he single-handedly saved the Corps from extinction and preserved it for the service of our nation in war and peace. He was born in Pointe Coupee Parish on 10 January 1867. After attending Louisiana State University, he obtained an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. Upon his graduation from the Academy in 1888, he was assigned sea duty aboard the USS Vandalia and Midshipman Lejeune began his exemplary career as a United States Marine.
• 1890: Commissioned Second Lieutenant while at sea.
• 1898: Captain Lejeune excels at sea during the Spanish-American War.
• 1903: Major Lejeune and his battalion quell uprisings in Panama.
• 1910: Graduates U.S. Army War College following tour in the Philippines.
• 1919: Lieutenant Colonel Lejeune and his 2nd Provisional Brigade quell uprisings in Cuba.
• 1914: Commands the 2nd Advanced Base Regiment in Vera Cruz, Mexico.
• 1917: promoted to Brigadier General, first commander of Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va.
• 1918: World War I, France - Commanded a brigade of the 32nd Division at Brest. - Commanded 4th Marine Brigade following Soissons offensive. - Promoted to Major General. - Commander of 2nd Division, American Expeditionary Force. - Became the first Marine officer to command a division in combat. - Assaulted Marbeche sector during drive on St. Mihiel. - Stormed Blanc Mont Ridge during Champagne offensive. - Led 2nd Division triumphantly into Germany following its surrender.
• 1919: Commands Marine Barracks, Quantico, VA. for second time.
• 1920: Named Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps. - Developed Fleet Marine Force concept. - Established formal Marine Officers schools at Quantico, Va. - Founded Marine Corps Association, Marine Corps Institute and Marine Corps League. - Provided sound leadership and much needed vision for the Marine Corps at a time when efforts were underway to dissolve the service. - Carved a unique path for the Marine Corps in amphibious operations thereby ensuring its long-term future.
• 1929: Major General Lejeune retired from active duty.
• 1929: Became Superintendent for the Virginia Military Institute, a position he held until poor health forced his resignation in 1937.
• 1942: Promoted to Lieutenant General while on retired list. - Became first Marine to hold that rank. - The assault against the Japanese on Guadalcanal proved his amphibious concepts and substantiated his service. - November 20, at the age of 75, John A. Lejeune died in Baltimore, Md. - Buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.
Today, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C. not only bears the name of one of the Corps’ finest officers, but the name of one of the most able officers of American military history. Presented by Patrick F. Taylor

The sculptor of this monument, Patrick Miller, depicted General John Archer Lejeune from a photograph. Archer was apparently putting on his riding gloves before a parade in New York City after returning from France following World War I, around 1919. Without using planned designs, the sculptor jumped straight into the full-size sculpture, casting it in clay. Six castings of the sculpture can be found throughout the U.S. One of the castings stands outside the birthplace of Lejeune in New Road, Louisiana.

 
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Saugus World War I Honor Rollloupe
298 Central Ave.
Saugus
MA
USA
01906

The inscription on this Honor Roll reads:

DEDICATED TO THE                                                                                                                       MEN AND WOMEN OF SAUGUS                                                                                                  WHO SERVED THEIR COUNTRY IN THE WORLD WAR 1917-1918

There are 6 rows of names inscribed, 10 of them have stars, indicating they died in battle.

AUTHORIZED BY TOWN MEETING MARCH 1927                                                                REPLACING HONOR ROLL DONATED BY MOTHERS 1918

 
Fallen Heroes Memorial - Sandwichloupe
1 Jarves St.
Sandwich
MA
USA
02563

Dedicated on November 11, 1922, the inscription on this memorial reads:

1917 - 1919
In Memoriam
Of
Our Fallen Heroes
In
The World War
“They Are In Some Special Sense
Soldiers Of Freedom”
Alden Clark
Michael S. Haddad
Erected by the citizens of Sandwich
November 11, 1922

 
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Southbridge World War I Memorialloupe
57 Elm St.
Southbridge
MA
USA
01550

Dedicated on January 1, 1938, the inscription on this memorial reads:

Names of Those
Who Made The
Supreme
Sacrifice

Frank Beers
Adelard Bibeau
Leo Bibeau
Stanislas Boisvert
Thomas H. Brogan
William Broughton
Henry C. Cunha
Samuel Desmaris
Parmelius Donais
Alphonse Dufault
Earl J. Durfee
Paul F. Fontaine
Robert Gardner
George Girard
Wilfred J. Girouard
William T. Kershaw
Arthur Lafleche
Theodore Proulx
Theophile J. Proulx
Henry W. Roberts
Pierre Talbot
Ralph L. Thresher
Albert S. Weeks

Emma Carey
War Nurse

Glory Shall Live Forever

They Gave Their Today For Our Tomorrow

Erected By the Citizens of Southbridge 1938


 
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Chester H. Grant Circle Markerloupe
1376 Grant Circle
Gloucester
MA
USA
01930

Erected in 1956, the inscription on this marker reads:

This Circle
Erected by The
Commonwealth
of
Massachusetts
1956
Is Dedicated to Honor
Chester H. Grant
1897 – 1954 A soldier and devoted citizen who faithfully served his community, state and nation in war and in peace.
A member of the Yankee Division 104th U.S. Infantry. Served in World War I in France 1917 – 1919.
He was cited three times for meritorious conduct under fire and received the silver star with palm.
As a public official for the city of Gloucester he displayed great ability in the performance of his municipal duties.

 
Franklin World War I Memorialloupe
Main St. at Church Square
Franklin
MA
USA
02038

The inscription on this memorial reads:

This Monument is dedicated to those who left their daily tasks among us to fight and die if needed be that freedom may live. Those who have made the supreme sacrifice in the World War

Lawrence J. Clark • Edward L. Grant • James R. Murray • Elijam M. Coldwell • Albert E.Johnson • Emilio P. Daddario • W. Franklin Lynch • Levi Peri • Jay Stone Davis • Alfred L. Mucciarone • Patrick Ristaino • Frank J. Smith

 
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World War I Memorial Dean Collegeloupe
99 Main St.
Franklin
MA
USA
02038

The World War I memorial sits in front of Dean Hall on Dean College campus. The memorial is carved granite with a square bronze insert listing those from Dean College that served in the Great War. There are an estimated 350 names listed.

TO THE ABIDING MEMORY OF THE SERVICE OF
THE SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF DEAN ACADEMY
IN THE WORLD WAR. 1914 - 1918 

THEIR MEMORIAL SHALL NOT DEPART AND THEIR NAME SHALL LIVE FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION

Some names include:

AYERS. W. EBEN, JR.
CATAELL, ALFRED L.
HOUSTON, HENRY C.
OTIS, LEONARD
WHITNEY, WALDO H.

and more ......

 
Northborough World War I Honor Rollloupe
40 Church St.
Northborough
MA
USA
01532

The granite Northborough World War I Memorial has a central bronze relief sculpture featuring five marching doughboys. The first and last soldiers are holding rifles on their right shoulders. The three central soldiers are carrying flags. On either side of the relief are honor rolls with the names of Northborough citizens who served during World War I. On top of the monument is a bronze sculpture of an eagle with its wings spread. The monument was dedicated on October 12, 1932.

Below the relief image is inscribed:

DIED IN SERVICE
ADOLPH C. NELSON
VINCENT F. PICARD  DEDICATED IN HONOR AND MEMORY
OF THOSE OF NORTHBOROUGH WHO
SERVED IN THE WORLD WAR 1917 - 1918

The left side honor roll is inscribed with the following names:

ADAMS, JULIUS K.
AVERILL, SILVEST
BALCOM, IRVING S.
BEMIS, ELMER T.
BLAKELY, ERNEST C.
BODREAU, FRANCIS P.
BOUCHER, ARTHUR J.
BOUVIER, ARTHUR H.
BRIGHAM, CHARLES C.
BRIGHAM, HAROLD M.
BRISTOL, CARROLL L.
BUCHANAN, JAMES J.
BURBANK, HAROLD R.
BURGOYNE, GEORGE H.
CALDWELL, FREDRICK W.
CARLSON, WALTER M.
CARNEY, JOHN V.
CHABOT, WALTER F.
COFFIN, HOLLAND
CROOKER, MAURICE N.
DANCKERT, JOHN J.
DAY, HOWARD F.
DEARMOND, ROY W.
DEROSIER, PHILIAS C.
ELDRIDGE, HOWARD ST. G.
FONTAIN, ARTHUR
GAUVIN, GEORGE F.
GILBERT, FRANCIS P.
GUERTIN, LOUIS H.
HARRINGTON, CLARENCE W.
HASKELL, FRNAK E.
JONES, LINDSEY L.
KELLEY, WALTER F.
KIMBALL, HOSMER R.

The right side honor roll is inscribed with the following names:

LANOIS, ESDRAS J.
LEARY, FRANCIS
LEARY, FREDRICK
LILLEY, FRANK S.
LUCIUS, DEWEY R.
MACKAY, TIMOTHY J.
MARTIN, HENRY J.
MAYNARD, EDWARD E.
MENTZER, ALBERT W.
MILLER, ELLIOT W.
MILLER, FRANK W.
MURRAY, FLORA E.
NELSON, CLARENCE N.
NELSON, GEORGE W.
PAUL, EBEN W.
PEINZE, CARL E.
PEINZE, HERMAN L.
PEINZE, WALTER A.
PICARD, JAMES L.
RICHARDS, WILLIAM A.
RYAN, MARTIN M.
SCHOFIELD, BERTRAND L.
SHERMAN, FRANK
SMITH, LESLIE H.
STONE, HERBERT A.
STONE, HOWARD D.
STONE, WINFRED H.
TRUDEAU, ESDRAS J.
WALKER, WILLIAM E.
WALLS, FRANCIS S.
WALSH, MATHEW J.
WEAGLE, DENNIS W. S.
WHEEELER, MILTON S.
WILLIAMS, ERNEST A.
WOODWARD, HENRY P.

 
Davis County Veterans Memorialloupe
28 E. State St.
Farmington
UT
USA
84025

Of the many monuments dedicated throughout Utah, the most noted and probably the most frequently visited are the monuments in Memory Grove Park, along City Creek, in Salt Lake City. The Davis County Veterans Memorial is housed in the old Davis County Courthouse in Farmington, Utah. The building was built in 1931-1932 as an expansion of an older courthouse and space for a war memorial was incorporated into the building's expansion design. Included was a space for a stained glass window tribute to the county's veterans. The beautiful art work memorializes (in its inscription) veterans of the Civil War, the Black Hawk Indian Troubles, the Spanish American War and Philippines Insurrection and World War I. The stained glass scene depicts a victorious angel heralding the efforts of a sailor and soldier, who are holding the flag of the United States over the world. The memorial contains the inscription: THEY WHO SACRIFICE MOST LIVE LONGEST IN THE HEARTS OF THE PEOPLE.

 
John A. Lejeune Lt. General, U.S. Marine Corps Monumentloupe
305 S. River Road
Baton Rouge
LA
USA
70802

During his more than forty years of service with the Marine Corps, John A. Lejeune participated in campaigns in Panama, Cuba, Mexico, France and Germany. He led the famed 2nd Division, American Expeditionary Force, during World War I with valor and distinction. His leadership of his Marines in the critical action at St. Mihiel earned him the French Legion of Honor.

As Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps, he foresaw a unique mission for the Corps in amphibious expeditionary operations. By doing so, he single-handedly saved the Corps from extinction and preserved it for the service of our nation in war and peace.

He was born in Pointe Coupee Parish on 10 January 1867. After attending Louisiana State University, he obtained an appointment to the United States Naval Academy. Upon his graduation from the Academy in 1888, he was assigned sea duty aboard the USS Vandalia and Midshipman Lejeune began his exemplary career as a United States Marine.

• 1890: Commissioned Second Lieutenant while at sea.
• 1898: Captain Lejeune excels at sea during the Spanish-American War.
• 1903: Major Lejeune and his battalion quell uprisings in Panama.
• 1910: Graduates U.S. Army War College following tour in the Philippines.
• 1919: Lieutenant Colonel Lejeune and his 2nd Provisional Brigade quell uprisings in Cuba.
• 1914: Commands the 2nd Advanced Base Regiment in Vera Cruz, Mexico.
• 1917: promoted to Brigadier General, first commander of Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va.
• 1918: World War I, France
- Commanded a brigade of the 32nd Division at Brest.
- Commanded 4th Marine Brigade following Soissons offensive.
- Promoted to Major General.
- Commander of 2nd Division, American Expeditionary Force.
- Became the first Marine officer to command a division in combat.
- Assaulted Marbeche sector during drive on St. Mihiel.
- Stormed Blanc Mont Ridge during Champagne offensive.
- Led 2nd Division triumphantly into Germany following its surrender.
• 1919: Commands Marine Barracks, Quantico, VA. for second time.
• 1920: Named Major General Commandant of the Marine Corps.
- Developed Fleet Marine Force concept.
- Established formal Marine Officers schools at Quantico, Va.
- Founded Marine Corps Association, Marine Corps Institute and Marine Corps League.
- Provided sound leadership and much needed vision for the Marine Corps at a time when efforts were underway to dissolve the service.
- Carved a unique path for the Marine Corps in amphibious operations thereby ensuring its long-term future.
• 1929: Major General Lejeune retired from active duty.
• 1929: Became Superintendent for the Virginia Military Institute, a position he held until poor health forced his resignation in 1937.
• 1942: Promoted to Lieutenant General while on retired list.
- Became first Marine to hold that rank.
- The assault against the Japanese on Guadalcanal proved his amphibious concepts and substantiated his service.
- November 20, at the age of 75, John A. Lejeune died in Baltimore, Md.
- Buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.

Today, Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., not only bears the name of one of the Corps’ finest officers, but the name of one of the most able officers of American military history. This is the second of six monuments of General Lejeune sculpted by Patrick Miller. Others are located at General Lejeune's birthplace in New Roads, Louisiana; the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; National Museum of the Marine Corps Base Triangle, Virginia; U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland; and Quantico Marine Corps Base in Prince William County, Virginia.

 
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Walter Manley Haynes Memorialloupe
174 E. Park St.
Thermopolis
WY
USA
82443

Walter Manly Haynes was born July 31, 1893 in Nebraska, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Haynes. The family move to Hot Springs County, Wyoming in the early 1900's. He and his brother, Rollie, signed their select service registration on June 5, 1917. In September of 1918 he was listed as missing in action. A week later it was officially announced that he had been killed. He was the first serviceman from Hot Springs County to die in World War I. Walter is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.  This memorial was erected in 2015 by the Hot Springs County Pioneer Association.

 
Lexington County WWI Memorialloupe
205 E. Main St.
Lexington
SC
USA
29072

The inscription on this memorial reads:

"A TRIBUTE TO THE SOLDIERS, SAILORS AND MARINES OF LEXINGTON COUNTY WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN THE WORLD WAR. 1917 - 1918"

The sides of the memorial list the names of the veterans who fought in World War I.

 
Spirit of the American Doughboy - Libertyloupe
625 Campbellsville St.
Liberty
KY
USA
42539

This statue was sculpted by E.M. Viquesney and dedicated on November 11, 1935.  It depicts a WWI infantryman advancing through the barbed wire and stumps of No Man's Land.  It was shattered on July 4, 1982 in a truck accident and recast the following year, and again dedicated on November 11, 1983. A 1935 plaque honors the memory of the citizens of Casey County who died in service in WWI.

The inscription on the plaque on the front of the concrete base reads:

DEDICATED TO
THE MEMORY OF OUR COMRADES
WHO ENTERED THE SERVICE
OF THEIR COUNTRY
FROM CASEY COUNTY, KENTUCKY
AND WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES
IN THE WORLD WAR.
ERECTED BY THE CITIZENS OF
CASEY CO. AND ELSEWHERE
UNDER AUSPICES OF
CASEY POST NO. 78, AMERICAN LEGION
NOVEMBER 11, 1935

An inscription on a plaque on the back of the base reads:

THOSE WHO MADE
THE SUPREME SACRIFICE
DURING THE WORLD WAR
1917-1918
CASEY COUNTY, KENTUCKY
(followed by list of 32 names in two columns)

The plaque on the near side honors, by name, those who made the supreme sacrifice in Vietnam (7) and Korea (6), and a plaque on the far side honors those who made the supreme sacrifice in World War II (75).

 
World War Veterans Monumentloupe
East Main Street
Liberty
SC
USA
29657

The Veterans Service Station was built in 1935 using local stone from the nearby Liberty Rock Quarry. The cornerstone of the building indicates that it was built by "CA_JC, & JS Newton". A marble plaque on the side of the building lists the mayor, council and other public figures at the time of the building's dedication, and also gives a history of the town, which claims that the town of Liberty was "founded in 1776 by a group of patriots." While this history is etched in granite on the building, it contradicts what is generally known about the area during the colonial period, when all of the land in Greenville, Anderson, Oconee, and Pickens counties was still Cherokee Territory.

A granite monument was erected next to the Veterans Service Station by Dr. E.J. Bryson soon after the building's completion. The monument includes a flagpole, lists the names of the local soldiers who fought in the first World War, and is "Dedicated to Veterans World War". The marker was struck by an automobile and broken in pieces many years ago. The pieces were collected by Mrs. Julia Jean Woodson, who kept the broken monument under a magnolia tree at her home on Main Street. In 2002, a Liberty councilman, Rick Clark, recovered the broken monument pieces from Mrs. Woodson, had them repaired and returned to the Veterans Service Station site.

 
Marion County World War Memorialloupe
South Main St. and Liberty St.
Marion
SC
USA
29571

This memorial honors the soldiers from Marion County who died during World War I.  It was erected by Marion City Schools in 1927.  The inscription reads:

“To you from failing hands we throw the torch; be yours to hold it high.”

This is a line from the famous World War I poem In Flanders Field by Lt. Col. John McCrae.

 
117th Infantry Regiment Doughboy Memorialloupe
101 E. 5th Ave.
Knoxville
TN
USA
37917

In 1921 a monument was erected in front of Knoxville High School in honor of the men who served in the 117th Infantry Regiment during World War I. The 117th had been part of the 3rd Tennessee Infantry in the pre-war National Guard. Called into service, the unit became the 117th Infantry Regiment, serving during the Great War as part of the 30th Infantry Division. On May 22, 1922 a special dedication ceremony was held. General John Pershing was one of the guest speakers who addressed the crowd of approximately 7,000.

The memorial consists of a life-sized bronze World War I infantryman appearing to run across rocky ground, carrying a rifle in his left hand and a grenade in his upraised right hand.  Beneath is a granite base and behind is a tall granite shaft topped by an eagle with outstretched wings. The shaft is adorned with medallions and several plaques honoring the local participants in wars from the Mexican War through World War I.  Some list the names of the 453 members of the 117th Infantry who died in World War I.

 
Clemson College WWI Memorialloupe
105 Sikes Hall
Clemson
SC
USA
29631

The inscription on this memorial reads: 

In Proud Remembrance of
Those Sons of
Clemson College
Who Gave Their Lives in the Great Cause

1917 - Of Liberty and Justice - 1918

Claude S. Garrett '17 1st Lt. 8th Aero Sq.
Richard H. Johnson '15 1st Lt. 56th Inf.
George L. McCord '11 1st Ly. 325th Inf.
John M. McIntosh '14 1st Lt. 357th Inf.
Stephen M. Richards '15 1st Lt. 87th Inf.
Augustus M. Trotter '15 1st Lt. 7th Inf.
Harry C. Horton EX,'19 2nd Lt. 11th Inf.
David E. Monroe '17 2d Lt. 16th Inf.
John B. Ryan '08 2nd Lt. 422nd Lab Bn.
Ozbourne T. Sanders '11 2nd Lt. Field Art.
Henry L. Suggs '16 2nd Lt. 85th Aero Sq.
Herbert F. Bethea '10 Sgt. M.P.
William G. Williams EX,'15 Sgt. 308th San. Tn.
John W. Hollowell EX.'17 Cpl. 117th Eng.
Henry A. Coleman EX.'14 Pvt. 1st Cl. 306th F.S.Bn.
James N. Goldsmith SP.'14 Pvt. 1st Cl. M.G.T.S.
George W. Hairston EX.'13 Pvt. 1st Cl. Q.M.C.
Frank P. Salter '14 Pvt. 1st Cl. Air Services
Robert L. Atkinson '19 Pvt. S.A.T.C.
Edward R. Roberts Ex.'17 Pvt. 105th Am. Tn.
John A. Simpson '15 Pvt Field Art.
Guy B. Taylor Ex.'15 Lt. Med. Corps, Navy
Arthur A. Madden '18 Mach. Mate, Navy
Frank S. Stewart Ex.'21 Seaman, Navy

 

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