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African American Officers pilots in dress uniforms doughboys with mules African American Soldiers 1 gas masks The pilots Mule Rearing Riveters

Maps

 

loupe
Grant St. at S. Sheppard St.
Richmond
VA
USA
23221

Dedicated in 1926, the inscription on this memorial reads:

IN HONOR OF
THE MEN AND WOMEN
OF
THE CITY OF RICHMOND, VIRGINIA,
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN
THE WORLD WAR
FOR THE PRINCIPLES OF
JUSTICE, FREEDOM AND DEMOCRACY.

ERECTED BY THEIR COMRADES OF THE
FIVE RICHMOND POSTS OF THE AMERICAN LEGION,
1926.

 
Northumberland County WWI Memorialloupe
Northumberland Highway
Heathsville
VA
USA
22473

The inscription on the front of this memorial reads:

★ ★ ★ WE, THE PEOPLE OF NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY, AS A LASTING EXPRESSION OF OUR GRATITUDE AND AFFECTION HAVE DEDICATED THIS MEMORIAL AS A TESTIMONIAL TO THE YOUNG MEN OF THIS COUNTY WHO IN A SPIRIT OF UNSELFISH PATRIOTISM ANSWERED THEIR COUNTRY'S CALL IN THE GREAT WORLD WAR ★ ★ ★

On the back:
KILLED IN BATTLE
WILLARD STANLEY HAZZARD • WILLIAM HENRY ARCHIBALD BUTLER • SAMUEL HERBERT BAILEY • ROSSER HENRY KENT

 
loupe
18900 Jefferson Davis Hwy.
Quantico
VA
USA
22134

Iron Mike is synonymous with a tough, brave American who has served for his country. Statues of Iron Mike has been used in different guises as monuments commemorating the different military branches of the United States, different wars, and even the Civilian Conservation Corps. The Iron Mike that stands at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Triangle, Virginia, is a World War I Marine holding a 1903 Springfield rifle, wearing a pack with a bayonet and trenching tool.

At the end of World War I, French sculptor, Charles Raphael Peyre, was commissioned to design a statue in honor of the American soldiers who fought in France. He used Marine Pvt. Carl J. Millard as his model and copied him exactly, right down to the Marine Corps emblem on his helmet. Army Gen. John Pershing demanded that the emblem be removed, but Peyre refused to compromise his work, and the Army would not buy it. Marine Corps Gen. Smedley Butler raised enough money to buy the statue and after being displayed at the the Exposition des Beaux Arts of the Grand Palaise des Champs-Élysées, in Paris, in 1919, the statue, entitled 'Crusading for Right', was installed in front of base headquarters at the then-new Marine Corps base at Quantico, VA. Iron Mike, as it is more commonly known, is a memorial to the Marines who gave their lives in World War I and was dedicated on December 8, 1921. Plaques were added to the base of the statue commemorating the officers and men of 5th Regiment and 6th Regiment, and the 6th Machine Gun Battalion, USMC, who lost their lives in World War I.

Iron Mike was duplicated to stand at the entrance to the Marine Corps museum. It is an exact replica of the original including the sculptor's name, 'Peyre', inscribed on Iron Mike's right boot, and the foundry where the statue was cast, 'VAL d'OSNE FONDEUR PARIS', inscribed on the left boot. Raised gold letters IRON MIKE are on the front of the 5-sided concrete base. Plaques to the 5th Regiment, the 6th Regiment, and the 6th Machine Gun Battalion are mounted on three sides. 

The original statue, 'Crusading for Right', remains in front of Butler Hall, now the home of the Marine Corps Training and Education Command, on base.

Northwest face inscription:
1775 Semper Fidelis 1918
In memory of the Officers and Men of the
6th Machine Gun Battalion
United States Marines
who gave their lives for their Country
in the World War in 1918.

West face inscription:
1775 Semper Fidelis 1918
In memory of the Officers and Men of the
6th Regiment United States Marines
who gave their lives for their Country
in the World War in 1918.

Southwest face inscription:
1775 Semper Fidelis 1918
In memory of the Officers and Men of the
5th Regiment United States Marines
who gave their lives for their Country
in the World War in 1918.

South face inscription: 
Commissioned and Donated
by Patrick F. Taylor, Cpl, USMCR
New Orleans, Louisiana

 
Washington and Lee Univ. WWI Memorialloupe
N. Jefferson and W. Henry St
Lexington
VA
USA
24450

This is a memorial to the students from Washington and Lee University who fought and died during World War I. The inscription reads:

To the memory of the sons of
Washington and Lee University
who sacrificed their lives for the cause of freedom in the service of our country and her allies. 1914-1918

George Moncrief Anderton, '12 • Howard Baker Barton, '17 • George Marvin Betty, '13 • Jay Frank Clemmer, Jr., '15 • Sidney Mathias Baxter Coulling, Jr., '16 • Cyrus McLawson DeArmon, '12 • Paul Waples Derrickson, '15 • William Lambuth Drake, '13 • Saunders Felming, '07 • Guy Nelson Forrester, '01 • Oswald Wilson Gott, Jr., '12 • Richard Helm Graham, '09 • Josiah Porter Green, '17 • John D. Alderson Harman, '12 • William White Holt, '16 • John Kirkpatrick, '15 • Louis Moomaw Layman, '13 • John Arthur Lingle, Jr., '15 • Aud Edward Lusk, '17 • Lawrence Bennett Loughran, '11 • Frederic Fagg Mallow, '15 • Abram Clifford McDougall, '07 • Clovis Moomaw, '12 • Frank Murchison Moore, '14 • David Sharpley Noble, '18 • Henry Morgan Patton, '16 • Charles Quarrier, '12 • Charles Carter Riticor, '14 • Kiffin Yates Rockwell, '11 • Frank Bennedict Scarry, '15 • J. Henry Smith, '18 • Basil Leighton Steel, '08 • Prentiss Guthried Thompson, '15 • Herbert McKinley Vest, '15

Students Army Training Corps
Marshall McClure Callison, '18 • George Gilbert Child, '18 • Donald Anderson Spotts, '18

 
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Gaetano del Giudice Memorialloupe
Plainfield Pike at Chopmist Hill Rd.
Chopmist
RI
USA
02857

This is a granite monument honoring Gaetano Del Giudice, a World War I veteran, a founder of the American Legion, and musician.

The thick stone is very roughly hewn into a square with a rounded top edge and is balanced on a similarly finished rectangular base. A just-out-of-round circle is carved about an inch deep into the monolith face. Inside and near the top of the circle is engraved with the outline of a French Horn and the text:

GAETANO DEL GIUDICE
THE MAN WITH THE HORN
SEPT. 18, 1887 - MAY 9, 1972
VETERAN OF WORLD WAR I
FOUNDER OF THE
AMERICAN LEGION

 
In Memory of Henrietta I. Drummondloupe
Main St. and Mineral Spring Ave
Pawtucket
RI
USA
02860

 The inscription on this memorial reads:

IN MEMORY OF

HENRIETTA ISABELLA DRUMMOND

1892 - 1918

FIRST RHODE ISLAND WOMAN TO MAKE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE AS AN ARMY NURSE WITH THE ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES IN FRANCE DURING THE WORLD WAR

"SHE LAID HIM WITH THE DEAD AS SHE TURNED TO SOOTHE THE LIVING AND

BIND THE WOUNDS THAT BLED." WHITTIER

ERECTED IN 1937 BY HENRIETTA I. DRUMMOND POST & AUXILIARY, THE AMERICAN LEGION.

In the waning days of World War One, Henrietta Isabel Drummond, 25, of Pawtucket, RI, USA, made her way across the Atlantic Ocean to serve as a Red Cross nurse. Her parents were from Glasgow. 

"I am having a wonderful time here," she wrote to her mother from aboard the Balmoral Castle, "and it will be a trip to remember. " They were to be the last words that Jean Drummond would ever receive from her daughter.

Having graduated in 1917 from the St Joseph Hospital School of Nursing, in Providence, RI, Henrietta Drummond trained in South Carolina and then made the submarine-menaced voyage from New York to France, arriving on October 4, 1918.

Assigned to a hospital in Nevers, in central France, Drummond worked 15-hour days caring for soldiers who had been gassed, who had not eaten in days, who had lost arms and legs, whose wounds had been left to bleed. As the nursing went on, a piercing whistle would signal enemy planes overhead - the threat of attack was constant. (Shortly before Drummond's arrival, a shot from a long-distance gun had struck a maternity hospital, killing 50 babies.)

The other constant danger in the soldiers' hospital was infection. And indeed on October 10, just six days after her arrival and a month before the war's end, Henrietta Isabel Drummond died, of either typhoid fever or Spanish influenza.

 
Suffolk and Nansemond County WWI Monumentloupe
Mahan St. east of Main St.
Suffolk
VA
USA
23434

This monument, dedicated in 1931, is a life-sized bronze statue of a WWI soldier dressed in a field uniform, carrying a jacket over his right arm and a helmet and rifle in the other.  Beneath is a multi-tiered granite base decorated with inscribed plaques listing the 41 men of Suffolk and Nansemond County who died during World War I.  The inscription reads:

In memory of the men of Suffolk and Nansemond County who gave their lives in the World War

1917-1919

They sought not glory, but their country’s good and died that right, which is more precious than peace, might prevail.

(side)
This tablet is erected as a tribute to the men of Suffolk and Nansemond County, Virginia who died in the service of their country in the Great War.

1917-1918

Ernest Baker • Hinton A. Darden • Claud D. Daughtrey • Gilliam Edwards • Charles O. Edwards • Enos H. Fretz • Reuben P. Gardner • James H. Gomer • Thomas C. Hamilton • George R. Harcum • Vernon M. Herrick • George A. Holloman • Herbert R. Holloman • Clarence E. Horton • Henry V. Jernigan • Clarence Jones • David J. Lassiter • Meigs M. Lassiter • Mitchell F. Lloyd • Sidney T. Norfleet • William E. Odom • Richard E. Parker • David L. Pitt • Bernard Radford • Herbert B. Ragsdale • Harry M. Richards • Charles L. Scott • Sam Turner • William A. Walters • Edward B. Walton • Johnnie N. Whedbee. COLORED William Anthony • Elijah Baker • John Brinkley • Berry Dunning • Ben Freeman • Arthur Geter • Willie L. Lee • Monroe Lloyd • John H. Nichols • Rosser Spivey

(rear)
Those who die for love of country sleep peacefully. Those who live to "carry on" hold high the torch that lights the flame of patriotism in the hearts of our children.

Anno Domini
MCMXXXI

Erected 1931.

This monument was located originally at the intersection of North Main Street and Milner Road (probably, present-day Constance Road). It was later moved to Cedar Hill Cemetery’s entrance due to an increase in traffic.

 
Narragansett World War Honor Rollloupe
Kingstown Rd. and Strathmore St.
Narragansett
RI
USA
02882

The inscription on this memorial reads:

Honor Roll
Town of Narragansett
World War

David Adair • Walter H. B. Allen Jr. • Charles W. Booth • William Boyd • Frank H. Brayman Jr • Joseph A. Bristow • Edwin L. Card • Louis E. Card • Clarence W. Carr • Harry S. Champlin • Leon M. Champlin • H. Stewart Chappell • Kenneth C. Chappell • Earl C. Clarke • Willis E. Clarke • Hugh T. Colgan Jr • Edward A. Comber • Stephen A. Comeau • Thomas Conroy • Edward Cullen • William F. Cullen • Joseph Darid • Edward J. Davis • *Wilmer H. Eicke • Consor L. Fayerweather • John R. Fell • Constantine Frank • Olive L. Clarke • Henry S. Gates • W. Murray Gates Jr • George G. Gavitt • Louis B. Gavitt • *J. Sidney Graham • Harry E. Harvey • George N. Hazard • Henry E. Hazard • William A. Hazard • Fred D. Hill • Harry B. Hoxsie • Walter W. Hoxsie • Linton B. C. Hutchins • William J. C. Hutchins • Fred K. Jacobus • Albert E. Jones • Ruel B. Karibe • John W. Keefe • Archie A. Kissouth • Philip F. Kissouth • Carl A. Knowles • Arthur L. Lamphire • Arthur E. Larkin • George E. Loughborough • William C. Marrow • Joseph H. Marshall Jr • Harry McCray • Philip McCray • William D. McCray • Robert McCullough • David B. McInnes • Malcolm L. McInnes • Abbott L. McIntosh Jr • Arthur E. Miller • John W. Miller Jr • Joseph Miller • Joseph G. Mulligan • William A. Murray • John O'Gorman • Joseph O'Gorman • Lousi O'Gorman • Richard O'Gorman • William O'Gorman • Arthur O'Neil • Ashley Pearse • Henry L. Perkins • Lloyd T. Perry • O. Lawrence Perry • Edward Pisani • Louis B. Potter • Philip M. Prescott Jr • Bernard B. Quinn • Martin J. Quinn • Patrick Ouinn Jr • *Stephen I. Quinn • F. Emlen Randolph • Philip S. Ranoldph Jr • Wister Randolph • Clifford T. Recking • Everett E. Robishaw • Levi H. Robinson • John A. Shaw • William E. Shepard Jr • Harold C. Sherman • Millard J. Sherman • Aldrich D. Smith • Walter Smith • Edmund J. Sullivan • Robert J. B. Sullivan • Edward F. Sweet • Percy A. Sweet • Adolphus E. Taylor • *Everett Tefft • *Nicholas Torti • J. Orient Watts • Stephen D. Wesbter • *John Weibel • George A. Whitford • Walter L. Woodmansee • Edward D. Wright • Henry B. Kane+ • Elizabeth G. O'Gorman+ • *John F. Harvey

Dedicated to those who left their place among us and
enlisted for naval or military service in the World War 1914 1918

 
81st Wildcat Division WWI Memorialloupe
North Main St.
Greenville
SC
USA
29601

This World War I monument stands just outside the gates of Greenville's historic Springwood Cemetery. It reads: "In Memory of 81st. Wildcat Division which trained at Camp Sevier Apr. to July 1918, Maj. Gen. Chas. J. Bailey, Commanding. Erected Oct. 13, 1956."

Although officially organized as the 81st National Army Division, the battalion came to be known as the Wildcat Division and entered the war theater in France toward the end of the war in 1918. With draftees primarily from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida, the group took on the name to reflect the fierce fighting and tenacious wild cats of the South and adopted a patch made from the silhouette of the cat as their insignia. They fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in 1918 and were in combat against the Germans in Verdun when fighting ceased on November 11 with the armistice. The Wildcat Division suffered 1,104 casualties during their short time in the war.

 
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King George County WWI Monumentloupe
Kings Hwy at Hudson Road
King George
VA
USA
22485

The inscription on this monuments reads:

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED IN MEMORY OF THE MEN WHO SERVED IN THE WORLD WAR FROM KING GEORGE COUNTY.

ERECTED IN 1935 BY THE RATCLIFFE-OWENS-SUMNER POST NO. 89, AMERICAN LEGION, VIRGINIA DIVISION; DONATED BY BETTY MCGUIRE SMOOT.

 
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West Liberty World War I Memorialloupe
Zanesfield St at N. Detroit St
West Liberty
OH
USA
43357

The inscription on this memorial, erected in 1933, reads:

THIS MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED TO THE MEN FROM WEST LIBERTY AND COMMUNITY WHO HAVE SERVED OUR NATION IN ITS CONFLICTS THE ARISTOCRACY OF TODAY IS NOT ONE OF BIRTH OR WEALTH BUT OF THOSE WHO DO THINGS FOR THE WELFARE OF THEIR FELLOWMEN.

1776 – 1918
DEDICATED NOV. 12, 1933

ERECTED IN 1933 BY AMERICAN LEGION POST #426.

 
LTC Charles White Whittlesey Memorialloupe
203 Wahconah Street
Pittsfield
MA
USA
01201

This marker is in memory of Charles White Whittlesey, a U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipient who led the "Lost Battalion" in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive during World War I.  As a major in the 77th Division, 308th Battalion, Whittlesey and his men were surrounded by the Germans from October 2 until October 7, 1918 in the Argonne Forest.

Whittlesey's Medal of Honor citation reads:

"Although cut off for five days from the remainder of his division, Major Whittlesey maintained his position, which he had reached under orders received for an advance, and held his command, consisting originally of 46 officers and men of the 308th Infantry and of Company K of the 307th Infantry, together in the face of superior numbers of the enemy during the five days. Major Whittlesey and his command were thus cut off, and no rations or other supplies reached him, in spite of determined efforts which were made by his division. On the 4th day Major Whittlesey received from the enemy a written proposition to surrender, which he treated with contempt, although he was at the time out of rations and had suffered a loss of about 50 percent in killed and wounded of his command and was surrounded by the enemy."

 

At the end of the ordeal, out of 550 men, only 194 were left alive and unwounded. In recognition of his valour, Whittlesey was made a Lt. Colonel and, along with his captains McMurtry and Holderman, awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

After the war, Whittlesey returned to law practice (he was a graduate of Harvard Law School). In November 1921, he booked passage on the S.S. Taloa, a steamer bound for Havana, Cuba. On Nov. 26, he dined with the captain and left the smoking room at 11:15 pm, stating he was retiring for the evening. It was noted by the captain that he was in good spirits. Whittlesey was never seen again. He is presumed to have jumped overboard; his body was never recovered. He left no explanation, but had written his will in New York before embarking on the journey and also left several letters in his cabin addressed to family and friends.

This memorial is an 'In Memory Only' marker, as Whittlesey's body was never recovered.  In addition, Whittlesey is also named on the family monument in the Pittsfield Cemetery.

For more on The Lost Battalion, see: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/233-lost-battalion.html

 
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Lost Battalion Memorialloupe
D66
Binarville
Grand Est
France
51800

 

The Lost Battalion Memorial is on the south side of the road D66/Charlevaux. It is in front of a green fence and is flanked by two flag poles. The memorial commemorates the combat of the 307th and the 308th U.S. Infantry Regiments of the 77th Division from the 2-7 October 1918.

The memorial is a stone sculpture containing helmets as well as a dove. It rests in a gravel base and is flanked by flagpoles. It was unveiled on 7 October 2008.

For more on The Lost Battalion: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/finding-the-lost-battalion-home.html

 
Doughboy - George C. Marshall Memorial Plazaloupe
145 West Main St.
Uniontown
PA
USA
15401

This doughboy statue is located on the George C. Marshall Memorial Plaza in downtown Uniontown, PA.  The inscription reads:

ERECTED IN THE YEAR 1936 BY UNIONTOWN POST NO. 47 VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS OF THE UNTIED STATES.  IN MEMORY OF THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED OUR COUNTRY IN ALL WARS AND WHO HAVE GIVEN THEIR LIVES THAT WE MAY LIVE AND PROSPER IN PEACE.

 

 
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Keith-Holmes War Memorial Parkloupe
412 Mulberry St.
Coraopolis
PA
USA
15108

Dedicated on Memorial Day 2021, with the support of Coraopolis VFW Post 402 and Sewickley VFW Post 5756, this bronze Doughboy statue honors veterans from all 6 service branches who fought in wars from World War I to the war on terror.  

 
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Fredericksburg Area War Memorialloupe
Liberty, Barton, and George Streets
Fredericksburg
VA
USA
22401

The Fredericksburg Area War Memorial sits on an island flanked by Liberty, Barton and George streets in historic Fredericksburg, VA. Ten years in the making and built by the Fredericksburg Area Veterans Council, it was dedicated on Sept. 13, 2008. Two months later, on Nov. 8, it was officially turned over to the city of Fredericksburg.

There are 6 granite slabs arranged in a semi-circle with a granite capstone and frieze that bears the words OUR FALLEN HEROES in bronze letters. The names of 400+ veterans from Caroline, King George, Orange, Spotsylvania and Stafford counties, and Fredericksburg, who died in service are inscribed on separate panels representing World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, and the Global War On Terror (Iraq and Afghanistan). The names are suitable for tracing similar to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. This structure was designed and donated by the Potomac Region Veterans Council. A Walk of Honor, which leads to it on either side, is paved with inscribed bricks bearing the names of soldiers not eligible for inclusion on the memorial.

Also included on site is a Navy anti-aircraft gun and existing flagpole with a plaque bearing a Roll of Honor to those who served in World War I.

 
In Honor of Urbane Bass - Stained Glass Window loupe
801 Sophia Street
Fredericksburg
VA
USA
22401

This stained glass window in the Shiloh Baptist Church honors Urbane Francis Bass (April 4, 1880 – October 6, 1918), an African-American doctor and first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, who was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions during World War I.  

Bass was born on April 4, 1880, in Richmond, Virginia to Rosa and Richard J. Bass. His father was a salesman, alternating from shoes and clothing in the 1880s, to insurance in the 1900s. The couple had six children and lived on East Duval St. in Richmond. While in school, Bass worked as a clerk. He graduated from Virginia Union University in 1902 and the Leonard Medical School of Shaw University in 1906. After leaving Leonard, Bass began a medical practice in Richmond but by 1909 had moved to Fredericksburg where he opened a larger practice and pharmacy on Amelia Street. Bass became the first African American physician since the Reconstruction to reside in the city and his practice was well received by the African American community despite the lack of privileges given by the local hospital.In 1916, Bass wrote to Secretary of War Newton Baker, offering his services as a doctor for the armed forces. In the letter he dictated, "I am herewith offering my services for the Army Medical Corps should there be need for a Negro Physician for that branch of Service. Dr. Urbane Bass, Fredericksburg, Physician".

Bass received a commission as a First Lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps and reported for duty at Fort Des Moines on August 14, 1917. Fort Des Moines opened for training African-American men as there had been a huge influx of African-American volunteers after a petition was erected by the students of Howard University. However, there was still some discontent at the facility as many soldiers found that he had been unfairly assessed for merely being black. After receiving basic medical officer training, Bass was transferred to  Camp Funston. On March 30, 1918, Bass departed for France with the 372nd Infantry Regiment of the 93rd Infantry Division

By September 1918, the 372nd and 369th Infantry were responsible for the defenses of Bellevue Signal Ridge, and assisted the French legions in trying to fend off the German assaults coming from the trenches. Most of Bass' work was done in the front lines, in the various aid stations, dealing with immediate injuries.

On October 6, 1918, Monthois, France was facing heavy artillery fire from the Germans, leaving many wounded in the process. Bass had gone into the line to provide immediate aid to the wounded when a shell blasted in the forward aid station he had been working in. The explosion severed both of his legs around the thigh region. With not many attendants around, Bass died in minutes from shock and blood loss. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on July 9, 1918, for administering "first aid in the open under prolonged and intense shell fire until he was severely wounded and carried from the field."

Bass' body was returned home and reburied in Fredericksburg National Cemetery on July 23, 1921, making him the first African-American officer to be interred there. The Shiloh Baptist Church in Fredericksburg installed a large stained glass window incorporating Bass' image in honor of his heroism. The American Medical Association acknowledged Dr. Bass's contributions and service in their 1919 issue. In 1991, the Rebel Bowl Building in Fredericksburg was renamed the Bass-Ellison Social Services Building, in honor of Bass and his fellow Fredericksburg citizen Dr. Richard C. Ellison.

 
Memorial Gate at Hampden Sydney Collegeloupe
College Road
Farmville
VA
USA
23901

Memorial Gate was built in 1921, to honor Hampden-Sydney alumni who gave their lives for their country in the Great War. Queen Mary of England sent rosebushes to be planted behind it; they survived until the 1960s. Since the 1970s, the gate has become a memorial to alumni who had died in all the country's wars. It now includes plaques for fallen heroes of the Revolution, the War of 1812, the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam Conflict, and September 11, 2001.

 
16th Infantry Memorial - Flevilleloupe
Town Hall
Fleville
Grand Est
France
08250

This memorial is located in the parking spaces directly in front of the Fleville town hall.  It is dedicated to the 16th Infantry Regiment who liberated the village of Fléville on October 4th, 1918. During this liberation, 27 of the soldiers of the 16th Infantry Regiment were awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

The memorial is a stone stele with a bronze plaque containing text and the symbol of the 16th Infantry Regiment.  The inscription reads:

This plaque is dedicated to the men of the 16th Infantry Regiment who fought so gallantly during the heavy fighting in the Meuse-Argonne and who on October 4, 1918 liberated the village of Fleville from the Germans. During the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne and the liberation of Fleville, twenty-seven men of the Regiment received the Distinguished Service Cross, America's second highest award for gallantry in action. It was after the liberation of Fleville, that the 16th Infantry Regiment adopted the Blue and White Fur Vair shield from the town's Coat of Arms, as the background for its Regimental Crest. That crest has been worn proudly by members of the Regiment for over eighty-years and has seen service in World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam, in the deserts of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and in Bosnia. The Regiment stands ready to serve again with pride and distinction. SEMPER PARATUS - ALWAYS PREPARED. 

The Regiment and the village of Fleville must never forget the heroic actions of those men and their dedication to their country and the ideals of freedom. We must always remember that - FREEDOM IS NEVER FREE. In this small French village in 1918, the price of Freedom was very high. 

Presented November 11, 1999 by the 16th Infantry Regiment Association. 

 
WWI Memorial Clock Tower - University of Detroitloupe
4001 W. McNichols Rd
Detroit
MI
USA
48221

The University of Detroit Memorial Clock Tower was built as a memorial to the 12 students and alumni who died in World War I.  As well as serving as a monument, the structure is built around the university's power plant chimney to disguise this industrial structure.
The clock tower is 175 ft high and was completed in 1926.  On the north side of the clock tower is an engraving memorial and 12 names:

 

TO THE UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MEN

WHO DIED IN THE WORLD WAR 1914-18

OUR HONORED DEAD

JOHN DESCHAMPS, CHARLES HARRISON, LOUIS MANS, EDWARDS J. BURNS, THOMAS G. KENNEDY, ALFRED FULLER, ROGERS MCNAMARA, JAMES WILLIAMS, LIONEL ESLIN, RUSSEL MCBREARTY, WILLIAM J. WILKINSON, THOMAS ABERY

FROM RELATIVES, ALUMNI AND STUDENTS

 

 

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