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Maps

 

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Willie Sandlin Markerloupe
Main St at Brown St
Jackson
KY
USA
41339

The inscription on this marker reads:

Kentucky's only medal of honor winner in World War I. Born at the head of Freeman Fork of Longs Creek, Breathitt County, KY. Jan. 1, 1890. Single handedly destroyed three German machine gun nests. Killed 24 enemy soldiers near Bois De Froges France Sept. 26, 1918. Received medal for heroism July 19, 1919, died Leslie County, KY. age 59, May 29, 1949 of lingering lung infection, the result of inhaling poisonous gas during war. Originally buried in Leslie County. Re-interred in Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville KY.

 
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Mount Hope Roll of Honorloupe
Main St at S Center Avenue
Mount Hope
WV
USA
25880

The inscription on this memorial, erected 1920 by the Order of the Eastern Star, Winolia Chapter No. 59, reads:

"IN MEMORY OF OUR LOCAL LOYAL DEFENDERS WHO OFFERED THEIR LIVES IN THE CAUSE OF WORLD DEMOCRACY, 1914–1918."

 
World War I Monument - Lynchburgloupe
2311 Memorial Ave
Lynchburg
VA
USA
24501

Moved to this location in November 2021 (from E.C. Glass High School), this marker consists of a large bronze plaque mounted on a locally sourced greenstone monolith. It honors the 42 local men who died in World War I, and was erected in 1936 by the Lynchburg Chapter of the DAR..

 
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Milford World War Memorialloupe
617 2nd St
Milford
NE
USA
68405

The monument was originally constructed in the Milford City Park in 1931 by the members of Milford’s American Legion Post 171 and dedicated on May 30, 1931. It was constructed of field stones collected from local farms. Each of the 52 Legion members was asked to bring 2 stones for the monument. There was a water fountain built into one side and a plaque above the fountain that read “In Memory, of Those Who Served, 1917 World War 1918, Milford Post 171, the American Legion, Milford, Nebr. May 30 1931”. In early 2012, the city maintenance crew inspected the monument and found it to be in disrepair and possibly dangerous. The water fountain was no longer in use and had probably contributed to the decline. It had always been a favorite climbing spot in the park for children and it was felt that it was no longer safe. After consulting with several qualified masons, it was determined that repair wasn’t really a good option. The cracks and structural issues meant that it wasn’t a good candidate for being moved. A consensus was reached that the best thing would be to disassemble the monument and rebuild it at another location in the park. The monument was disassembled by the city maintenance crew and the stones and plaque put into storage. Inside the monument was found a glass jar with a typed list of the Legion and Auxiliary members from 1931.

It was decided to build the memorial back (as close as possible) to the way it had been, but leave out the water fountain. A nice visible corner in front of the community and library building was chosen. This was more visible and away from the playground equipment. The city had supplied the labor to tear down the old monument, but they thought that the Legion should pay for rebuilding it. $5,500 was raised for the reconstruction.

In May of 2012 the monument was reconstructed. This time it would have a nice solid concrete base, a steel internal support structure, the stones from the old monument, the plaque from the old monument and a new rededication plaque.

In the spring of 2019, the mayor of Milford gave some money to plant some grass, small bushes, and street bricks for a walk way up to the monument.

 
42nd Rainbow Division Memorial at Croix Rouge Farmloupe
La Croix Rouge
Fère-en-Tardenois
Hauts-de-France
France
02130

Inaugurated in November 2012, this Memorial of the 42nd Division commemorates the 162 soldiers from Alabama and their Iowa comrades who died on the battle field of the Croix Rouge Farm as well as all the soldiers of the Rainbow Division who gave their life for France during the Great War. Created by British sculptor James Butler, MBE (RA), it was erected by the Croix Rouge Farm Memorial Foundation (Montgomery, Alabama) and was donated to the city of Fère-en-Tardenois, so that the bronze soldier who carries the body of his dead comrade remains forever the witness of the sacrifice made by young Americans on July 26, 1918, and so that it remains for future generations a symbol of French-American friendship and a call for peace among nations. 

For background on the memorial, see: https://croixrougefarm.org/the-sculpture/

 
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Cpl. Carl Dana Brandon Memorialloupe
195 Van Hill Road
Greeneville
TN
USA
37745

This 70-foot flag pole is dedicated to World War I soldier Carl Dana Brandon, born on September 6, 1897 and raised in the Fall Branch community of Greene County, TN. He was the son of Andrew Jerome “Rome” Brandon and Cora May Pierce Brandon. He was also an Uncle to Carl Jerome Brandon, the original Owner & Founder of the Davy Crockett TA Travel Center.

Carl Dana joined the Tennessee Army National Guard in May 1917 shortly after graduating from Fall Branch High School. He advanced to the rank of Corporal later that year and was soon on his way across the Atlantic to the European Theatre of the First World War. He was a member of the 117th Infantry Regiment, 59th Infantry Brigade and the 30th Division. The 30th Division later became known as the Old Hickory Division, named in honor of General, President, and Tennessee native, Andrew Jackson.

During the Battle of Montbrehain on October 8, 1918, Carl Dana was fatally wounded and passed away later that night. He is interred in the Somme American Cemetery in Bony, France.

The current owners of Davy Crockett TA Travel Center, great nephews of Carl Dana, are proud to honor the wish of their late father, Carl Jerome, by dedicating this beautiful 70-foot flag pole to Carl Dana Brandon and to all the other men and women who served in war and peace. 

If you would like to learn more about the late Carl D. Brandon and his full write up,
follow this URL: ETVMA Carl D. Brandon Biography

 
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The Madison Town Clockloupe
S. Dalton St. at E. Murphy Sts
Madison
NC
USA
27025

Soon after World War I ended, local citizens contributed money to purchase the Madison Town Clock as a memorial to the men who served and died during the Great War.  Purchased from Boston for approximately $600, this specially made number two striking clock is believed to have been shipped by boat to Wilmington, North Carolina and then by rail to Madison.  Engraved on the clock face are the words “All Those Who Served” and identically engraved on the clock Bell which was cast in Baltimore, Maryland by McNeely and Son.

For more information: https://www.townofmadison.org/index.asp?SEC=54C8B15B-F7EC-4318-8483-CAF6A1643B8E&DE=B258B751-2F5E-487A-B2BF-D9E7942E3648&Type=B_BASIC

 
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Wilkes County WWI Memorialloupe
West D St at Memorial Ave
North Wilkesboro
NC
USA
28659

The Wilkes County Memorial Avenue World War I Monument stands about fourteen feet tall on a sidewalk corner at the intersection of D Street and Ninth Street (Memorial Avenue). This stone marker has a large rectangular base, with an obelisk shape making up the top portion of the monument. The original bronze plaque on the top portion of the monument faces Ninth Street (Memorial Avenue), with a list of fifty-one Wilkes County veterans who gave their lives in World War I. A second plaque was later added in 2000 to the opposite face of the monument, with a corrected list of fifty-five names of Wilkes County World War I veterans.

 
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The Dixie Doughboyloupe
S. Sykes Creek Pkwy at Fortenberry Rd
Merritt Island
FL
USA
32952

The inscription on this memorial reads:

THERE WERE 33,331 SOLDIERS FROM FLORIDA WHO SERVED IN WORLD WAR I. MANY SERVED IN THE 31ST INFANTRY DIVISION. A DIVISION COMPOSED OF SOLDIERS PRIMARILY FROM GEORGIA, ALABAMA AND FLORIDA. NICKNAMED THE “DIXIE DIVISION”.

THIS MONUMENT SERVES IN MEMORY OF ALL WHO SERVED IN THIS GREAT WAR 1917 – 1918.

THE STATUE WAS SCULPTED BY CHARLES E. SMITH.

 
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Moline World War I Memorialloupe
1820 6th Ave.
Moline
IL
USA
61265

The Moline World War I memorial was dedicated in 1929.  Around a flagpole is a sculpture by C.S. Paolo consisting of a circular grouping of bronze figures. The figures include a soldier, an angel of glory, an angel of mourning, a boy, and father time. Another angel stands behind holding a semicircular garland. 

 
World War I Veterans Memorialloupe
Veterans Memorial Island Sanctuary
Vero Beach
FL
USA
32963

This statue, honoring World War I veterans on the Veterans Memorial Island Sanctuary, was installed in November 2021. The $29,000 monument, paid for through private contributions and local veterans organizations, features a bronze statue of a World War I doughboy carrying a Springfield 1903 rifle and bayonet. The statue was placed so the doughboy appears to look at the sanctuary's central walkway that honors local veterans who have died.

 
Susanville Veterans Memorial Buildingloupe
1205 Main Street
Susanville
CA
USA
96130

This Veterans Memorial building was erected in 1926 in honor of all World War I veterans and future veterans who have served the U.S. and Lassen County, CA. The building hosted the American Legion State Convention August 15-19, 1926. More than 2500 attended the convention, doubling the size of Susanville.

The inscription on the building reads:

Constructed and dedicated to honor
the Veterans of World War I
and all future Veterans who have served the
United States of America and Lassen County,
Constructed February through August of 1926 and
Dedicated on August 17, 1926


 
The Sergeant Stubby Memorial at the CT Trees of Honor Memorialloupe
Walnut Grove Road
Middletown
CT
USA
06457

Pvt. J. Robert Conroy befriended a stray pup as his infantry regiment trained on the Yale University campus in the summer of 1917. Naming the mutt Stubby, Conroy somehow smuggled him to France where he became the regiment's mascot. Stubby participated in 17 battles, was wounded twice, saved countless lives by smelling mustard gas before it arrived, and once captured a German spy by biting him on the butt (Stubby had an uncanny ability to identify Germans). He was renamed "Sergeant Stubby," returned home as a war hero, and met President Woodrow Wilson, who shook his paw.

On Memorial Day 2018, this life-size bronze statue of Sgt. Stubby was unveiled in his home state of Connecticut. The sculpture by Susan Bahary depicts Stubby giving a salute, a trick that endeared him to Conroy's commanding officer. He wears a vest that was made by the grateful women of France, to which were pinned Stubby's many medals. Stubby was the most decorated dog of World War I.

Also see: http://roadstothegreatwar-ww1.blogspot.com/2022/01/the-sergeant-stubby-memorial.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

 
All Veterans Memorial at Turkey Brook Parkloupe
30 Flanders Road
Budd Lake
NJ
USA
07840

The ALL VETERANS MEMORIAL  is New Jersey's premier veteran's memorial located at Turkey Brook Park in Mount Olive, New Jersey and touted for its distinctive designs and calming landscape. The unique ceremonial ground is the host to historically denoted military ceremonies and vigils.  

The shape or footprint of the memorial was inspired by the Congressional Medal of Honor which is highest military honor to be earned from the United States and is awarded for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. Because the medal is presented "in the name of Congress", it is often ... intended to represent the gratitude of the American people. The AVM's STAR or Pentagon Platform  represents the five branches of services, equally divided. The area consists of pavers that denote the honorable military service of all who served during war or peacetime. 

The War Dog Memorial features a statue, among others, of Sgt. Stubby, hero dog of World War I.  See pictures gallery.

For more detail on the AVM see: https://www.allveteransmemorial.org/

 
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Brighton War Memorialloupe
240th Ave
Brighton
WI
USA
53182

The Brighton War Memorial, located on 240th Avenue (Highway X), was built in 1921 in remembrance of Brighton’s fallen Civil War and World War I soldiers. The first monument included the names of 68 men from Brighton who died during the Civil War and the 37 men who died in World War I. In 2016, private funds were raised to expand the memorial to honor veterans from World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

 
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Burlington Veterans Memorialloupe
585 Milwaukee Avenue
Burlington
WI
USA
53105

This monument is dedicated to all veterans who served their country faithfully in wars and other conflicts. There is a separate plaque for Burlington residents who served during World War I.

 
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World War I Archloupe
455 E. Huron St
Berlin
WI
USA
54923

This is a granite arch, erected as a tribute to the Berlin veterans of World War I.

 
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Oconomowoc World War Memorial loupe
Veterans Memorial Park
Oconomowoc
WI
USA
53066

This memorial, in Veterans Memorial Park, was dedicated in 1926 and has a small plaque in front that reads:

TO THOSE WHO SERVED
IN
THE WORLD WAR
OCONOMOWOC CHAPTER
AMERICAN
WAR MOTHERS
1926

 
Wauwatosa World War I Memorialloupe
Root Common Park
Wauwatosa
WI
USA
53213

On November 11, 2018, the 100-year anniversary of the end of World War I, this peaceful Root Common Park was rededicated to the men and women from Wauwatosa serving in the war. The trees are a tribute to the four soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice in defense of liberty: Bernard A. Diedrich, Alexander E. Shiells, Harry S. Robbins and William Nehring.

At this site, on Memorial Day, 1928, the City of Wauwatosa dedicated three elm trees and bronze plaques to three Wauwatosa men who died serving our country during World War I. Over time, the trees died and the plaques were lost. Reconstruction of Root Common Park in 2018 revealed parts of the original memorial and a fourth fallen World War I soldier was identified.

They served in the U.S. Army’s 32nd Division, along with 15,000 other members of the Wisconsin National Guard. The 32nd fought in four major campaigns; defeated 23 German divisions; captured over 2,000 prisoners; suffered over 14,000 casualties; never yielded ground to the enemy; and were given the name “Les Terribles” by the French for their audacity in battle.

Shortly after the war, the Division adopted the shoulder insignia of a battle line shot through with a red arrow, symbolizing its tenacity in piercing every German defensive line faced. The 32nd became known as the Red Arrow Division and continues to operate today as the 32nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Wisconsin National Guard.

 
Service Star Legion WWI Memorial Flagpoleloupe
N. Prospect Ave. at Lincoln Memorial Dr.
Milwaukee
WI
USA
53202

This is a flagpole topped with a bronze eagle and four reliefs carved onto an octagonal granite base.  It was sculpted by Benjamin Franklin Hawkins and dedicated by the Service Star Legion in October of 1932 to honor the veterans of World War I.

Background: A report surfaced in the June 2,1927 edition of the Milwaukee Sentinel stating that there was discussion and debate arising as to where to best place a monument to soldiers and sailors, intended to be erected by the Milwaukee Chapter of the Service Star Legion, an organization of war mothers.

Location debate continued while the group considered designs for the project, and finally settled on a replica "doughboy" statue, of which there were already three erected in various eastern cities. Unfortunately, Milwaukee's Art Commission rejected the selection, causing members of the Service Star Legion to appeal to Milwaukee's alderman to overrule the Art Commission by resolution. Alderman John Koerner answered the call, and introduced a resolution at a special Milwaukee Common Council meeting in late July 1930, which was approved. This set up a stand-off for a time between the commission and the council, with A. C. Hansen, Secretary of the Art Commission, being quoted in an August 1, 1930 Milwaukee Journal article as citing a state law that gave the commission primacy over public art installation decisions, making the council's action void. It was eventually ruled that Hansen was right, and the Milwaukee Art Commission's decision stood.

This slowed project momentum while the Service Star Legion figured out how to follow through with the Art Commission's request that they hold a contest to pick an artist. The contest commenced in 1933, and members of the Legion met at the Art Institution on September 18, 1933 to view the 17 models that came in from artists throughout the country. Alfred G. Pelikan, director of the Art Institution, was quoted in a September 20, 1933 Milwaukee Journal article as saying, "We are just helping to arrange the exhibition. I was asked to help judge the memorial contest, but I said 'nosiree.' I've got enough trouble of my own."

While the women of the Service Star Legion ultimately settled on Benjamin Franklin Hawkins' flagpole design, they were reported to have little enthusiasm for it. Mrs. Louis Manegold, chairwoman of the Legion's Memorial Design Committee, said, "We picked this as the best of the designs submitted, but there was not one in the competition that appealed to us as much as the doughboy. He seemed typical of the feeling of the boys when we saw them come home in 1919. This is graceful and impressive, but it doesn't express a thing."

From there, developments moved quickly from approval to planning, and then to a groundbreaking ceremony on August 1, 1934 at the chosen site, a small triangle of land bounded by N. Second St., N. Plankinton Ave. and W. Wells St. A few months later the project was complete, and a dedication ceremony was held on November 11, 1934, then known as Armistice Day. The flagpole unveiling was seen as the highlight of the day honoring the 750 Milwaukeeans who lost their lives in World War I.

The flagpole stayed in its location until June 14, 1979, when it was moved to be closer to the War Memorial Center as part of MacArthur Memorial Week, June 7 - 14. The flagpole had stood taller at its original location, installed atop two octagonal granite stones, but was relocated with only one of those base stones to the new location.

 

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